R1b-U152-Z71 Italo-Roman didn?t leave England after all?

Twilight

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15/32 British, 5/32 German, 9/64 Irish, 1/8 Scots Gaelic, 5/64 French, 1/32 Welsh
Y-DNA haplogroup
R1b-U152-Z56-BY3957
mtDNA haplogroup
J1c7a
Hey guys, R1B-BY3957 is downstream from R1B-FGC36902.
If R1B-Z71 came from Italic tribes, do you know when FGC36902 spread out to England?

Were there any Roman Centurions; or their families that stayed behind in England during the Dark Ages?

Thanks so much in advanced


Source for the pic :) :
https://sennewini.blogspot.com/2017/11/?m=0
 
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Were there any Roman Centurions; or their families that stayed behind in England during the Dark Ages?

How do we not know it comes from Normans???
Romans would have it difficult to stay(I mean the possibility is there), but after the Anglosaxon conquest and having a weak foothold in Britons land...
 
How do we not know it comes from Normans???
Romans would have it difficult to stay(I mean the possibility is there), but after the Anglosaxon conquest and having a weak foothold in Britons land...

I suppose a Norman lineage is possible; there is a FitzRandolph and Randoll lineage that shares this ydna subclade.
However my surname Blackledge is Anglo-Saxon and Ancestry Thrulines has Thomas Blackledge (1706-1790) as a biological ancestor; so adultery would need to be involved in order for the Ydna to be Norman. It would be interesting to see if the FitzRandolph or other Norman lineages were living in the Whittle Le Woods, Lancashire area in the 17th century; and a match to BY3957?s son R-U152-BY3957-BY97456. 🤔
Edward FitzRandolph (1607-1684) was BY3957-A8380

Although curiously, other surnames with BY3957 on scaledinnovations were Ballard, Eaton and Hollingsworth; all Anglo-Saxon surnames.
27B957E9-020C-4AB1-8CF4-F2A53FDD8553.jpg
 
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According to the sources that I have read, very few Italians came to Britain during the Roman occupation. Most of the people that the Empire brought to Britain were Gauls, Spanish and Germans. There was also a legion of Syrians who were claimed to have settled in NE England near Hadrian's Wall and remained there after 410AD - i.e. the year when Rome abandoned Britain.
 
so adultery would need to be involved in order for the Ydna to be Norman.

Or maybe adoption? Though not sure how common that would have been, and among the nobility, and compared to children born out of adultery of female nobility. Both would seem to be rather rare but not unheard of.
Though it also could have been someone adopted or born out of adultery somewhere further down the line.
 

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