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Gary C.
09-07-09, 20:02
And what's your Y and/or mt haplogroup?

My Y haplogroup is commonly referred to these days as R1b-U106*.
At present,I don't fit in any of the subclades,the major one being L-48+.
We have a new Walk The Y project at FTDNA,for searching for new Y SNP's in U106's that are negative for L-48.

My mitochondrial haplogroup is H1*.
H is the most common mito haplogroup amongst Europeans.

I've had 67 Y markers tested by FTDNA,and partial SNP testing.Already had tested + for S21 at EthnoAncestry,and that was confirmed by FTDNA.
Also had HVR1 and HVR2 done by FTDNA.
And also CCR5,where I discovered I do have a 32 base-pair deletion,and also 1 normal copy.
The most recent thing I did was 23andMe.

What about you?

Maciamo
09-07-09, 20:30
Thanks for the idea, Gary. I have added a poll.

Gary C.
09-07-09, 20:50
Thanks Maciamo!!

Chris
10-07-09, 18:50
And what's your Y and/or mt haplogroup?

My Y haplogroup is commonly referred to these days as R1b-U106*.
At present,I don't fit in any of the subclades,the major one being L-48+.
We have a new Walk The Y project at FTDNA,for searching for new Y SNP's in U106's that are negative for L-48.

What about you?

Mine is also R1b U106 L48+. I'm fascinated by this stuff and Maciamo's Y origins etc page is by far the most readable and informative I've found after months of searching:
http://www.eupedia.com/europe/origins_haplogroups_europe.shtml

Chris

Gary C.
10-07-09, 20:05
The only thing I'd caution anyone about is this:your Y chromosome has no idea what ethnicity you are.
It has no bearing on anything except for making you a male,and all that goes along with that.
The haplogroups are determined by what should be thought of as 'inheritable packages of SNP's'.There are only around 50 of them,and all human males are going to be a member of one.
The genetic factors that make up traits and characteristics that we perceive as race and ethnicity are not located on the sex-determining chromosomes.They are located on the other 44 chromosomes.
You can be a member of any particular race or ethnicity,and discover that you have a Y or mt haplogroup that you wouldn't expect to have.This can and does happen.Y DNA haplogroup A is found among Bushmen in Africa,and also among some white men named Bass that live in North Carolina.That's not what you'd expect to find among white men,anywhere-but it has happened.
I also have personal knowledge of some black Americans that are in Haplogroup I.That's not what you expect from a black man,anywhere.
In both cases,what must be true is they descend in a direct male line from a man that wasn't a member of their race or ethnicity.They have inherited his Y DNA SNP package-but probably,nothing else remains in their bodies from the man that was their ancestor,except his Y chromosome.They look just like any other typical member of whatever their race or ethnicity is,because the autosomal DNA that is present in the rest of their bodies is the same that is shared by all the members of that race or ethnicity.

Having said all that-because of DNA testing having been carried out in a great many places,we know to EXPECT to see particular Y and mt haplogroups in particular places.And the ones we expect to see,will greatly dominate in the area they are mainly located in.
But you COULD find any haplogroup,anywhere.Their origins pre-date any sort of paperwork method of tracking the people that could have carried them into unexpected places.

Chris
10-07-09, 20:35
The only thing I'd caution anyone about is this:your Y chromosome has no idea what ethnicity you are.
It has no bearing on anything except for making you a male,and all that goes along with that.

That's something I've found from my web 'research'. One source gave a theoretical example of a white male who moves to China, and whose offspring's children are of Chinese women: within 10 generations, the descendents are for all intents and purposes, Chinese.

Chris

Maciamo
11-07-09, 11:54
The only thing I'd caution anyone about is this:your Y chromosome has no idea what ethnicity you are.
It has no bearing on anything except for making you a male,and all that goes along with that.
The haplogroups are determined by what should be thought of as 'inheritable packages of SNP's'.There are only around 50 of them,and all human males are going to be a member of one.
The genetic factors that make up traits and characteristics that we perceive as race and ethnicity are not located on the sex-determining chromosomes.They are located on the other 44 chromosomes.

Y-DNA of course does not define ethnicity. But if all your ancestors come from a same region (e.g. East Anglia, or Wales), knowing the Y-DNA frequency in that region might give you important clues about your own genetic history.

Ancient ethnicities have little to do with modern populations. People in Europe are a heavy admixture of many different ancient peoples represented by the various haplogroups.

As DNA is recombined at every generation, and differently for each child born to the same parents, even siblings do not inherit all the genes from the same ancestors. That's why in some families some children might have brown hair and eyes and others blond hair and blue eyes. This is just for obvious characteristics. 99% of our genome is not clearly visible from outside. You can't know if you are lactose tolerant by looking at a mirror.

Once populations get mixed over many centuries or millennia, all sorts of combinations take place. It is meaningless to talk of an English or French or Spanish ethnicity. What is ethnicity anyway ? Is it defined by looks alone, or by one's immune system, metabolism, or blood sugar level ?

The study of Y-DNA is highly important for our understanding or history and migrations, or even linguistics. Y-DNA does not equal ethnicity, that's for sure, but contrarily to what many people think, the Y-chromosome does influence a little bit a man's character, through testosterone production. It has been reported that members of haplogroup R tend to be more aggressive than other haplogroups. We will see in a few years in such trends can be confirmed or not.

Nasturtium
21-07-09, 00:49
23andme and I've uploaded my raw data to Promethease. I'm J1a*, which I have not seen mentioned here. I know there are some descrepancies between 23andme and their Mtdna results (some at 23andme have gotten conflicting results from multiple sources). I'm new here, and just looking to gleen what I can from my DNA, as my family history is incomplete.

Semitic Duwa
14-04-10, 15:34
Y-DNA and mtDNA of course...

I'm planning to purchase a genealogical autosomal test for my mother.

Ana72
06-08-10, 06:57
Y-DNA and mtDNA of course...

I'm planning to purchase a genealogical autosomal test for my mother.

I also want to try this one. As I have learned that Autosomal DNA (http://www.dna-paternity-test.net/how-accurate-is-dna-testing.htm) is inherited from both parents, and includes random contributions from their parents, grandparents, and so on. Therefore, your autosomes essentially contain a complete genetic record, with all branches of your ancestry contributing a piece of your autosomal DNA. Autosomal DNA tests can be used to search for relative connections along any branch of your family tree. Unless the connection is so far back that the shared DNA has essentially been eliminated through too many generations of recombination, any autosomal match between two individuals indicates a possible genetic connection. It examines the nucleotides at specific locations on a person's DNA for genetic genealogy purposes.

Aristander
07-08-10, 05:31
I've done Y and MTDNA from FTDNA, my Y came back pretty generic R1b1b2 Atlantic Modal, so I signed up for the Deep Clade-R test which should come back in a couple of weeks. I just got my MTDNA back and again I'm a pretty generic H1. I am still trying to get my brain around what the results mean.
HVR1 differences from CRS
16188G
16519C
HVR2 differences from CRS
263G
309.1C
315.1C
CR differences from CRS
750G
1438G
3010A
3421A
4769G
4859C
8856A
8860G
15326G

My main reason for the Y testing was to try make some connections with some other people to help clear up my genealogy. So far I haven't had much luck, I have made some connections with people with the same surname but they are actually fairly close relations, only 5 or 6 generations back. I'm looking to sort out which group of immigrants my direct ancestor came to America with. There are 3 groups that immigrated to America on in 1733, one in 1749 and another in 1752. Unfortunately there are so many with the same Christian first names that my research group can't sort out who is who.

Pallantides
10-08-10, 01:27
Y-DNA: R1b1b2a1a1*
mtDNA: N1a1
I have tested myself with 23andMe and FTDNA ...also DNA tribes but that is something I'm trying to forget.:laughing:

Semitic Duwa
10-08-10, 02:01
^^lol, yes; they said you were Ma3ribi right?;)

Pallantides
10-08-10, 02:54
My results were so out there, luckily 23andMe got it right though.

Carlitos
28-09-10, 00:32
I did the genetic test at 37 chromosomes to the DNA Y and mitochondrial DNA, so DNA Y I stayed at M35, I was advised to expand the test and came to E1b1b1a3 V22 + I claimed as a Phoenician (Canaanite), but do not know what time that ancestor had come to Spain, and under what circumstances, besides I have genetic neighbors across Europe, I know, I was told that having genetic neighbors in the Russian Federation and Hungary increased the chances that had entered Spain as a Jew but in my family has no oral tradition that was well and besides I have overlooked genetic half of Europe and the world, well the point is that I do not have the knowledge to get to find out, since I am not an expert in genetics.

I also sent my results to a geneticist who is announced by the network and he said he did not have to be Phoenician, and that more and more busy.

In the project of my haplogroup E, do not loose clothing, no one gets wet when it comes to say: For your lineage arrived in Spain about this or that date, is a small group of elites who know much about genetics but not help those who we know little or nothing, so in the end may be try to pay and pay, as they will eat what you ate Cain, because if entry does not lend a hand, having paid the tests, the minimum is to know something else.

Mitochondrial DNA J took me claimed Celtic (Europe)

Kissapray
05-10-10, 05:36
I took the Mitochondrial DNA test at FamilytreeDNA. I know that I am haplogroup H but, that doesn't help me much to know my ethnicity since it exist all around Europe. Is autosomal testing reliable enough to determine your ethnicity?

Chris
05-10-10, 20:01
I took the Mitochondrial DNA test at FamilytreeDNA. I know that I am haplogroup H but, that doesn't help me much to know my ethnicity since it exist all around Europe. Is autosomal testing reliable enough to determine your ethnicity?

Maciamo's your man for this, but a DNA forum I belong to says not - too many uncertainties, apparently.

Carlitos
06-10-10, 00:40
It is always reassuring to certify that you are on planet Earth.

iodalach_draiodoir
07-10-10, 03:21
I did all my tests and FamilyTree DNA, and got:

R-U106 for Y-DNA
A for mtDNA
80% white/european, 13% amerindian and 7% afro-american in autosomal (FamilyFinder)

Carlitos
07-10-10, 16:24
I did all my tests and FamilyTree DNA, and got:

R-U106 for Y-DNA
A for mtDNA
80% white/european, 13% amerindian and 7% afro-american in autosomal (FamilyFinder)


In my laboratory did not give me many%

iodalach_draiodoir
07-10-10, 20:41
23andMe and FTDNA give you this information when you do the family finder/autosomal tests.

Yorkie
18-10-10, 02:06
To date, I have done the following tests:
My Ydna: I2a2b-Isles 'D2'
My Maternal Grandfather's Ydna: I1-Norse
My Father's Mtdna: H5
My MTdna: U5a1

I have not as yet taken the plunge with autosomal dna testing because I do not feel that the technology is reliable enough regarding intra-continental testing, though it appears to be [FTDNA and 23andme] regarding continental testing. Going by my paper-trail genealogy, I would imagine that an autosomal test would likely show me as 100% European.

alais
13-06-12, 19:21
Y-DNA: R1b1b2a1a1*
mtDNA: N1a1
I have tested myself with 23andMe and FTDNA ...also DNA tribes but that is something I'm trying to forget.:laughing:

Does DNA tribes really works?

Knovas
16-06-12, 14:39
Does DNA tribes really works?
They improved their analysis. I got a free promotion due to the fact I'm an Eurogenes project member, and DNA tribes matches were quite according to my ancestry. However, it worth mentioning that it was a joke before.

zanipolo
16-06-12, 22:10
They improved their analysis. I got a free promotion due to the fact I'm an Eurogenes project member, and DNA tribes matches were quite according to my ancestry. However, it worth mentioning that it was a joke before.

1 agree 100% with your comments

RaHoWa
21-10-12, 13:37
I have done my full y-dna and autosomal dna and partial MTdna.What is interesting to me is how my results all match with my family history.I am an American,more exactly from the southern United States.My Y-dna was L21 and when I did further tests it showed to be a Brythonic type that was only common in the western Lowlands of Scotland and not in England or Wales.It matches with the Scotch-Irish history of my family since many Ulster Scots came originally from the western Lowlands of Scotland and the Borders.My autosomal dna was more interesting, had it done with dna tribes and it showed strong matches for Belgium but not for Germany or the Netherlands.After looking into it further I found its because a large part of my family history and the English settlers who came to the southern United States in colonial times came mainly from southern England and the West Country and what was bascially the old kingdom of Wessex.This is also the main area where Belgic Celtic tribes lived.I even found sources where people today in places like Somersetshire,Gloucester,Wiltshire,Hampshire England today had the same Belgic matches I did.My MTdna is H and that is all I know about that for now.

Grubbe
12-05-13, 01:57
I have done tests with various companies since 2004, but have stayed with FTDNA the last 8 years.

DavidB
14-07-13, 03:36
I'm a new member of Eupedia with Y-DNA and MT-dna results that I just received

Y - I-M253
mtDna - T2B

My male ancestors are from Denmark and my maternal ancestors are from England. I'd like to learn more about T2B.

The test was done by Geno 2.

I also have autosomal results from Ancestry.Com and Geno that I can mention later.

Thanks, David

Tatar
15-08-13, 19:33
Y-dna and autosomal.

silkyslovanbojkovsky
20-08-13, 21:45
And what's your Y and/or mt haplogroup?

My Y haplogroup is commonly referred to these days as R1b-U106*.
At present,I don't fit in any of the subclades,the major one being L-48+.
We have a new Walk The Y project at FTDNA,for searching for new Y SNP's in U106's that are negative for L-48.

My mitochondrial haplogroup is H1*.
H is the most common mito haplogroup amongst Europeans.

I've had 67 Y markers tested by FTDNA,and partial SNP testing.Already had tested + for S21 at EthnoAncestry,and that was confirmed by FTDNA.
Also had HVR1 and HVR2 done by FTDNA.
And also CCR5,where I discovered I do have a 32 base-pair deletion,and also 1 normal copy.
The most recent thing I did was 23andMe.

What about you?

Where can I take a dna test telling me my subclad of R1a? I took a dna test with ancestry.com and it only told me I am R1a. I also took their autosomal dna test and it told me I was 29% Scandinavian, 63% Eastern Eruopean, and 8% uncertain. Three of my grandparents are from Slovakia and the fourth is an American European mix of Western Europe excluding Italy, Spain and the Scandanavian countries. How accurate do you think ancestry.com's dna test is? and Also why I show up as havig such high Scandinavian when I have no known ancestors from there.

silkyslovanbojkovsky
20-08-13, 21:47
What was the reason are they more reputable than the other ones?

silkyslovanbojkovsky
20-08-13, 21:50
Very Interesting. Its great to see other Americans who want to and do learn about their heritage. So many people in the u.s say im Irish or English or whatever, but know absolutely nothing about it in reality and don't care to learn about or visit the places where their ancestors came from.

silkyslovanbojkovsky
20-08-13, 21:51
How much did the test cost you?

Huracan
21-02-14, 04:01
I am:
Y-DNA: T1a2*-L131 (CTS11984)
mtDNA: L3e2b

:D

martiko
24-02-14, 01:36
YDNA DF100
Mtdna T1a1

I made family finder test, DF100, deepclade deep, test mt on hvr1 / 2....

I am with Y DNA german baltic
with German Mt DNA east or ashkznaze

with autosmale: northwest German, German centers or east; French Basque; French Basque or Aragon

Ethniquement I am Basque

nationality French

Here is in the fact that you can expect contradictory when you undertake tests.

Djordjo
24-02-14, 14:52
Still none of the tests, but I hope that I will get some money these days, so I can do y dna test on 12 markers finally, altough my final goal is to do a test on 37 markers. I will do FTDNA test because they have test on 12 markers, they are the cheapest and I can add money later to upgrade the test to 37 markers

A Norfolk L-M20
26-03-17, 23:09
Ft-DNA
Family Finder.
Full mtDNA Sequence
Y111
Big Y

Big Y data also analysed at FGC and YFull.

23andme.
Phased with one parent.

Living DNA.

My Y is L1b2c or L-FGC51036 via L +M20 + M22 +SK1412 +SK1414 +FGC51036.

My mtDNA is H6a1a8.

My auDNA is European, NW European. It is atypically Continental for a British tester.

My family history and recorded genealogy is all SE English, including 77% to 85% East Anglian over the past 250 years or so

ajc347
27-03-17, 00:10
I've done a single test with LivingDNA and the results were:

Y-DNA: L151+ (U106-, P312-, & S1200-)
mtDNA: V15a

My autosomal results were:

Europe 100%
Great Britain and Ireland 90.6%
East Anglia 26.8%




Southwest Scotland and Northern Ireland 12.4%




Southeast England 8.8%




Northwest England 8.1%




Devon 5.8%




South Central England 5.5%




Ireland 5%




North Yorkshire 4.5%




Cornwall 4.4%




Central England 2.1%




South England 2.1%




Northumbria 2.1%




Northwest Scotland 1.7%




Orkney 1.3%






Europe (unassigned) 9.4%



The autosomal results are a pretty accurate reflection my family tree over the last few hundred years and the only surprises were the figures for the Northwest, Northwest Scotland, North Yorkshire, Northumberland and the Orkneys, given that I have no known relatives from these areas (although I understand that there maybe some overlap with neighbouring areas and this may help to account for the Northwest results).

The 9.4% Europe (unassigned) result was also interesting and unexpected. I'm hopeful that this figure will be broken down further once the Complex and Cautious results are made available. :)

citizen of the world
27-03-17, 00:37
-FTDNA (Y37+BIG Y+FAMILY FINDER+ MTFULL SEQUENCE)
-Britain dna (chromo2 complete)
-National Geographic (GENO2.0 Next Generation)
-Genos (Medical DNA)

Rethel
01-04-17, 15:01
...................................

Rethel
01-04-17, 15:04
............................................

Nerys
17-04-17, 20:12
None yet, still trying to figure out which one to do, so reading information about the tests.

agila
17-04-17, 21:29
Hi!

I hope this is the right thread to post this. I want to take a test but I am not sure about which one to take. I am doubting between 23andme, Geno 2.0 (National Geographic) and FamilyTreeDNA. Is there any post with pros and cons about them? Any suggestion?

My idea is to know the family group I come from and know more about the history of my family (I can only reach up to the 4th generation), the percentage of Neanderthal DNA I might have (if any) and see if there is some cousin around.

Thanks in advance for your time and help!

jgg
18-04-17, 00:04
Follow the link How wecan trace our ancestry with DNA Which test to take by Marciano, which gives a pretty good idea of the different test available. Good luck and bienvenido/a al forum!

mlukas
05-05-17, 01:42
Hi!

I hope this is the right thread to post this. I want to take a test but I am not sure about which one to take. I am doubting between 23andme, Geno 2.0 (National Geographic) and FamilyTreeDNA. Is there any post with pros and cons about them? Any suggestion?

My idea is to know the family group I come from and know more about the history of my family (I can only reach up to the 4th generation), the percentage of Neanderthal DNA I might have (if any) and see if there is some cousin around.

Thanks in advance for your time and help!

National Geogrpahic GENO? Is somebody in 2017 realy choose it?

murad1234
30-08-17, 13:19
I did both family tree and ancestry I found family tree breaks done borders better in my opinion.

Jovialis
13-10-17, 20:31
I put my 23andme sample in the mail yesterday; should arrive at their lab on Monday. What are some of the other more prominent tests I can transfer my results to?

I've previously done the National Geographic Genographic 2.0 Helix Test. As well as the Insitome Neanderthal traits test. Insitome is going to have their own ancestry test later this fall, which I plan on doing.

MelvynGreer
20-03-19, 15:44
Hey. I did a mitochondrial DNA analysis, and when I was looking for which test to do better, I came across an interesting article on DNA repair https://www.biospace.com/article/releases/nyu-langone-medical-center-release-factor-preserve-dna -integrity-in-bacteria-despite-assault- From antibiotics — and I had questions. What do you think, when humanity can update DNA?