Anglo-Saxon Cross from one of the Earliest Christian Burials in Britain

Jovialis

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The 1,300-year-old gold and garnet cross was unearthed at Trumpington Meadows near Cambridge in 2011 on land for a new housing development.


The grave is thought to be one of the earliest Christian burials in Britain.

The Trumpington Cross, thought to be worth more than £80,000, was donated to Cambridge University's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (MAA).

Her body was laid in the ground in a wooden-framed bed, with metal brackets and a straw mattress, and surrounded by possessions including gold pins, glass beads and an iron knife.

Cambridge University archaeologists say the cross marked her out as an early convert to Christianity, and indicated she was of aristocratic or even royal blood.

The cross will be displayed at the MAA along with other grave relics.

Senior curator Jody Joy said the cross, and other material recovered from the dig, were of "international quality and significance".

"Taking pride of place in our galleries, the cross will allow us to tell the story of the coming of Christianity to the region and some of the history of this previously unknown Anglo-Saxon settlement," she said.


http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-42886855
 
Mmo5Y2hl.jpg


The 1,300-year-old gold and garnet cross was unearthed at Trumpington Meadows near Cambridge in 2011 on land for a new housing development.


The grave is thought to be one of the earliest Christian burials in Britain.

The Trumpington Cross, thought to be worth more than £80,000, was donated to Cambridge University's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (MAA).

Her body was laid in the ground in a wooden-framed bed, with metal brackets and a straw mattress, and surrounded by possessions including gold pins, glass beads and an iron knife.

Cambridge University archaeologists say the cross marked her out as an early convert to Christianity, and indicated she was of aristocratic or even royal blood.

The cross will be displayed at the MAA along with other grave relics.

Senior curator Jody Joy said the cross, and other material recovered from the dig, were of "international quality and significance".

"Taking pride of place in our galleries, the cross will allow us to tell the story of the coming of Christianity to the region and some of the history of this previously unknown Anglo-Saxon settlement," she said.


http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-42886855

I don't know if you saw "The Last Kingdom" on netflix. It covers the conflict between the Saxons and the Vikings and the role religion played in that. King Alfred's championship of Christianity is highlighted, but also the fact that this "new" religion wasn't yet universally accepted. I thought it was really quite good.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_Kingdom_(TV_series)
 
Im not sure about these historical movies, I always hesitate to watch bc I usually end up disappointed when I find out that many scenes, including the really cool ones, are inaccurate.

When I saw 300, I thought at least 95 percent of it was real, including the scene where Leonidas kicked the messanger down the pit (though I did have doubts it was actually bottomless) but I was really disappointed when I found out how unrealistic it was and that's when I lost faith in how true to history these movies really are.
 
most historical movies are phantasies in a setting looking realistic enough to the public
 
That's what the internet is for, if you're not familiar with the specific historical event or person. You're able to tell what has been altered and what seems to be accurate.

The biggest benefit of movies like this, other than entertainment value, is that they pique your interest in a part of history with which you're not familiar.

In the movie in question the main character and his exploits are fantasy; the historical data provided about Alfred, the conflict between Vikings and Anglo-Saxons, the role of the Church, his interest in legal reform, and education, and even to some extent about specific battles, is accurate.

Maybe before judging something you should actually watch it.

As for the 300, a fun movie in my opinion, it's a cartoon. There's no comparison.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_the_Great
 
Im not sure about these historical movies, I always hesitate to watch bc I usually end up disappointed when I find out that many scenes, including the really cool ones, are inaccurate.

When I saw 300, I thought at least 95 percent of it was real, including the scene where Leonidas kicked the messanger down the pit (though I did have doubts it was actually bottomless) but I was really disappointed when I found out how unrealistic it was and that's when I lost faith in how true to history these movies really are.

Why would you even assume it was, especially down to the minutia of action scenes? 300 is historically INSPIRED by a Frank Miller comic book.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/300_(comics)
 
Mmo5Y2hl.jpg


The 1,300-year-old gold and garnet cross was unearthed at Trumpington Meadows near Cambridge in 2011 on land for a new housing development.


The grave is thought to be one of the earliest Christian burials in Britain.

The Trumpington Cross, thought to be worth more than £80,000, was donated to Cambridge University's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (MAA).

Her body was laid in the ground in a wooden-framed bed, with metal brackets and a straw mattress, and surrounded by possessions including gold pins, glass beads and an iron knife.

Cambridge University archaeologists say the cross marked her out as an early convert to Christianity, and indicated she was of aristocratic or even royal blood.

The cross will be displayed at the MAA along with other grave relics.

Senior curator Jody Joy said the cross, and other material recovered from the dig, were of "international quality and significance".

"Taking pride of place in our galleries, the cross will allow us to tell the story of the coming of Christianity to the region and some of the history of this previously unknown Anglo-Saxon settlement," she said.


http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-42886855


Well lets hope it represents a Christian Cross, as it could also just be an Anglo Saxon Cross that has nothing to do with christianilty, was she buried east west,etc, what actually proves her connection to chrisianity. Most christians were supposedly to be buried without goods, unlike the pagan burials which would very much be represented as she was.
 
Well lets hope it represents a Christian Cross, as it could also just be an Anglo Saxon Cross that has nothing to do with christianilty, was she buried east west,etc, what actually proves her connection to chrisianity. Most christians were supposedly to be buried without goods, unlike the pagan burials which would very much be represented as she was.

The Peterborough Cathedral (in Cambridgeshire), not that far from the finding, was originally built as Church in 655 AD under the rule of an Anglo-Saxon King.
The date is close enough to give some credence to the conclusion of the Cross been Christian.
ps (Out of Topic but Interesting) Catherine of Aragon, Queen of England under Henry VIII is Buried there.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peterborough_Cathedral
 
Wait till you hear that what liberties Mel Gibson took with Braveheart
Thanks, I appreciate, but I'd much rather not know about how he stretched things, it'll only make me disappointed in the end. Ignorance is bliss (well ok ignorance in terms of diet, healthy habits, adding numbers and other practical things isn't lol)
 

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