Best Pizza in Italy

That's the most British thing you have said Angela. I guess you got some British friends then

That struffoli looks yummy :)

I do, as a matter of fact...a very nice man originally from Yorkshire. :)

He has a very Italian palate, however, French as well. We once went to a very old school Southern Italian restaurant and I suggested he order the Pasta Puttanesca. He scarfed it up, even using a "scarpetta" or piece of bread to mop up the sauce once I told him it was permitted.

I said to him, I guess you liked the sauce. He responded that he'd swim in it if he could! :)

Pasta "prostitute" or "tart" style, as my friend calls it, is not for those who like bland food, as the ingredients, in addition to tomatoes, are garlic, anchovy fillets, capers, oil cured black olives, and crushed red pepper. I happen to love it, but it's not for everyone.

Btw, my friend introduced me to Nigella Lawson and a lot of other British chefs ; he calls me Nigella for fun sometimes. :) I've picked up a couple of phrases from him, such as "Could I have a word"? Other people don't know what I'm talking about...

This young Irish one does a good job.

 
People don't realize that "pizza" used to be a very regional food in Italy. I never had Neapolitan pizza until we came to this country.

This was our "pizza": focaccia

CIMG1316.jpg

Recco_Focaccia_Formaggio_2.jpg


4743485605_29190379fc.jpg


I quickly became a fan, however.


search
 
People don't realize that "pizza" used to be a very regional food in Italy. I never had Neapolitan pizza until we came to this country.

This was our "pizza": focaccia

CIMG1316.jpg

Recco_Focaccia_Formaggio_2.jpg


4743485605_29190379fc.jpg


I quickly became a fan, however.


search

I love focaccia. Sometimes, I even cut it like a sandwich, and put mortadella inside.
 
oh boy

same things from antique
but with different names?

WE STILL DO EAT AS OUR ANCESTORS?

Λουκουμαδες lukumades

site_21_rand_1153377411_loukoumades.jpg


9k=


lukumades more bread inside

images



served with honey, nuts, sesami, sirups sugar, fantastic flavor chinnamon

2Q==





as for focaccia hm
IT IS MORE ANCIENT
in Greek λαγανον laganon Pontic Greek Λαβας lavash (probably effect from Aryan-Iranian or Armenian)
Strange but the Greek laganon (sound λαwhanon today) linguistic is connected with word Lasagna-ia

1457640822-fab0f9836958a1e2698d920d51682461-586x330.jpg


and the the thin ones

2Q==

2Q==

2Q==

feta-pita.jpg



SO 4000 years now we share the same delicacies as our grand grand .... fathers
Especially Italians, which from antique had famous grain production

any possible conection of foccaccia word with spongia word?

Just to remind you
the ancients Greeks merchant a lot and colonise S Italy for its Grain production
it was consider the best,
the most famous grain in antique world,
while the most productive in quantity was Crimaia, and Egypt


BTW

what do you believe is the best grain wheat for pizza?
 
oh boy

same things from antique
but with different names?

WE STILL DO EAT AS OUR ANCESTORS?

Λουκουμαδες lukumades

site_21_rand_1153377411_loukoumades.jpg


9k=


lukumades more bread inside

images



served with honey, nuts, sesami, sirups sugar, fantastic flavor chinnamon

2Q==





as for focaccia
IT IS MORE ANCIENT
in Greek λαγανον laganon Pontic Greek Λαβας lavash (probably effect from Aryan-Iranian or Armenian)
Strange but the Greek laganon (sound λαwhanon today) linguistic is connected with word Lasagna-ia

1457640822-fab0f9836958a1e2698d920d51682461-586x330.jpg


and the the thin ones

2Q==

2Q==

2Q==

feta-pita.jpg



SO 4000 years now we share the same delicacies as our grand grand .... fathers

Yes, I think we do.

Struffoli are like tiny doughnuts. We make larger ones too. So do many other countries, of course.

These are Zeppole...they're like French beignets:
f21439d12ef670aa54e919d722969604.jpg


You can fill them too:
cda1e5e50625c7778d73f4d7de64a934.jpg


The third picture in the prior post is of what we call farinata or cecina. It's not made from wheat flour but from the flour of chickpeas. It's wonderful, sweet, and creamy, but only if you eat it hot. It's one of the few foods, like a gelato, that no one criticizes you for eating on the street.

We also make a type of pita in my area. We have retained a lot of old food customs and even food utensils. You pre-heat clay discs in the fire, and then pour in a thin batter made of just flour, water, salt, and sometimes a bit of oil, or in some places it's more of a soft dough.

 
@Yetos You say: “what do you believe is the best grain wheat for pizza?”

imho Soft wheat flour type "0" if you don’t want to hear the Pizzaman shouting Profanity at the World as the pizza rips when he slaps the pizza dough.
It’s also about elasticity. In Italy this flour is also used for regular bread and focaccia.
ps Many restaurants make bread or focaccia from the leftover pizza dough of the night before.
 
I do, as a matter of fact...a very nice man originally from Yorkshire. :)

He has a very Italian palate, however, French as well. We once went to a very old school Southern Italian restaurant and I suggested he order the Pasta Puttanesca. He scarfed it up, even using a "scarpetta" or piece of bread to mop up the sauce once I told him it was permitted.

I said to him, I guess you liked the sauce. He responded that he'd swim in it if he could! :)

Pasta "prostitute" or "tart" style, as my friend calls it, is not for those who like bland food, as the ingredients, in addition to tomatoes, are garlic, anchovy fillets, capers, oil cured black olives, and crushed red pepper. I happen to love it, but it's not for everyone.

Btw, my friend introduced me to Nigella Lawson and a lot of other British chefs ; he calls me Nigella for fun sometimes. :) I've picked up a couple of phrases from him, such as "Could I have a word"? Other people don't know what I'm talking about...
Hahahaha he defiantly gave you some important words you can use i remember my mother saying "Could I have a word with you" and getting the biggest telling off, even from the teachers aswell at school XD

Pasta Puttanesca/Pasta prostitute That's is some strong language for a Pasta!
 
What are the preferred toppings for pizza in Italy?
Pizza al Nord
1 prosciutto e funghi (89%)- Prosciutto and mushroom
pizza-mozzarella-prosciutto.jpg

2 gorgonzola e salame (76%) Blue cheese and salami
pizza-bianca-gorgonzola.jpg

3 capricciosa (71%) Mozzarella cheese, ham, mushroom, artichoke and tomato- I don't like this one, probably because I don't like pizza w/cooked ham
344479bb46de170d9e883c20d1d11b35.jpg

Donne-Women
1 vegetariana (84%) Vegetable
2 bresaola e rucola (82%) Air dried salted beef and arugula lettuce

pizza-bresaola-rucola.jpg



Pizza al Sud
1 bufala (82%) Bufala mozzarella and tomatoe
2 marinara (71%) Just tomato
3 tonno e cipolle (64%) Tuna and onions
Donne
1 Norma con melanzane e ricotta salata (67%) Eggplant and dry, salty ricotta
pizza-norma-melanzane.jpg

2 frutti di mare (59%) Seafood
3 pomodorini, capperi e olive (45%) cherry tomatoes, capers and olives


I don't know if I buy this. I like the southern ones a lot more. Maybe I've been in America too long?

I do like the prosciutto and mushroom one.


 
It's possible that the word pizza comes from the Byzantine Greek πίτα, Gaeta and Naples were under the Byzantine rule for many years. But the recipe is another thing.

I agree
The Italian pizza is much different from the Greeks foods Yetos mentioned.
 
I had focaccia yesterday and it was one of the best things I've ever had! I had it in the past without knowing what it was called, but as of yesterday I had some really high quality focaccia and the rich olive oil made it heavenly. Aesthetically, it looks like a boring old piece of bread, and when it's in your hands it feels hard as a rock so naturally one without focaccia experience wouldn't expect much excitement from it but giving it a shot will get you hooked!

Is it ok to put tomato sauce and mozzarella on it to make it into a pizza? Or maybe stuff it with ricotta? I don't see much room for improvement, focaccia is absolutely fantastic on its own!
 
I had focaccia yesterday and it was one of the best things I've ever had! I had it in the past without knowing what it was called, but as of yesterday I had some really high quality focaccia and the rich olive oil made it heavenly. Aesthetically, it looks like a boring old piece of bread, and when it's in your hands it feels hard as a rock so naturally one without focaccia experience wouldn't expect much excitement from it but giving it a shot will get you hooked!

Is it ok to put tomato sauce and mozzarella on it to make it into a pizza? Or maybe stuff it with ricotta? I don't see much room for improvement, focaccia is absolutely fantastic on its own!

Why not, call it “Calzone alla Davef” lol
 

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