British food is delicious!

Angela said:
I'm sure foreigners would be aghast at a mother giving her child something with a bit of alcohol and coffee in it, but no one thought anything of it, just as no one thought it odd that a lot of children were given mixed wine and water at meals. As I said, different cultures.

In France too, children were given mixed red wine with water during lunch. I remember drinking it at almost every meal at my grandmother's place (though it was very diluted). But people hardly ever do that anymore now, even in the countryside. Most kids drink soda with lots of sugar, fruit juice or cordial. It's so much healthier! :-/
 
In France too, children were given mixed red wine with water during lunch. I remember drinking it at almost every meal at my grandmother's place (though it was very diluted). But people hardly ever do that anymore now, even in the countryside. Most kids drink soda with lots of sugar, fruit juice or cordial. It's so much healthier! :-/

They call it baptized wine! :)

There's even a picture of me holding an upturned fiasco (straw covered) flask up to my mouth. It was empty. Probably one of my nonna's renters gave it to me for a joke to take the picture.

Never does anyone any harm, from what I can tell. My father was one of eleven, and among them, their spouses, and all the multitude of first cousins, not one has a problem with alcohol.
 
Try cottage pie, it’s the best British food by far...
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Dropping in for a minute, I’m on vacation currently in London, and I must say it is a really beautiful city. I loved it from the minute we got here. I particularly want to mention how much I adore British cuisine, specifically nose to tail. Yes, it fantastic! Last night I ate deviled kidneys, bone marrow on parsley salad, snails and barely, and lamb broth. Today I had scotch eggs, and various meat pies for lunch. I’m looking forward to dinner tonight.

I absolutely love and appreciate British food!

Never thought of snails as being British...Most Brits I know cannot stomach snails as much as Rabbit :). Hope you tried Roast beef and Yorkshire pudding with lots of rich dark gravy. The irony is that Most Brits now have Pasta Bolognese, Lasagnia (suspicious foods in the 70's) Indian Curry at par with good ole Roast beef as their favorite home cooked dishes :). Shepherds / Cottage pie and Cornish pastries make a good bite. Fish (Cod) and chips still an old favorite and well done makes a hearty meal, my favorite with mushy peas (not keen on the gravy beans or curry that can come with it). Dont forget there are some excellent British cheeses to discover too. Rhubarb and custard is my favorite desert any time and I can eat Christmas pudding all year round.
 
Dropping in for a minute, I’m on vacation currently in London, and I must say it is a really beautiful city. I loved it from the minute we got here. I particularly want to mention how much I adore British cuisine, specifically nose to tail. Yes, it fantastic! Last night I ate deviled kidneys, bone marrow on parsley salad, snails and barely, and lamb broth. Today I had scotch eggs, and various meat pies for lunch. I’m looking forward to dinner tonight.

I absolutely love and appreciate British food!

Wondering if you've visited some of the places that Liv.DNA assigned to you,

regardless of accuracy (could be Roman DNA) and if possible, I would it done anyway.

... would’ve been interesting :)

about the food:
I should have said earlier what the Black Pudding is made of, but sometimes it’s better not to know.
(I regret finding out after I ate it ...) :petrified:
 
I was collecting (other days I go hunting) snails in some oleander hedges and an old man passed by and said to me: strongly affected. I don't care they would have great. And the truth is that they were strong but I loved them. What does not kill you, get you fat.
 
I was collecting (other days I go hunting) snails in some oleander hedges and an old man passed by and said to me: strongly affected. I don't care they would have great. And the truth is that they were strong but I loved them. What does not kill you, get you fat.

To find good quality Snails, after a night of drizzling or light rain, people would go early in the morning in the massive artichoke fields near the town of Brindisi (about 30 Km from my town in Italy).

After that, they fed the Snails white flour for a couple of days, only then were ready to be cooked or sold.

For longer lasting, they would put the Snails in boxes with dirt and white flour, eventually, the Snails would retreat in their shells by forming a dry white seal.
Add water to wake them up :)
 
Cheesecake is common now in Italy. You can find it in the version closest to the original or in some variants more "Italian-like".
 
The water doesn't come from anywhere near Canada, which is about 300 miles away. It comes from the Catskills and the Delaware catchment area, which are maybe an hour or an hour and a half north and northwest of the city. It's a beautiful part of the country.
nycsystem.pdf

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It's true that the best Italian restaurants and even pizzerias import canned tomatoes, romano and parmigiano cheese (hard cheeses), olive oil, etc. from Italy. However, some neighborhood pizzerias don't. Mozzarella, which spoils very quickly, is almost always locally sourced.

One of the reasons Italian American cooking is different from Italian cooking is precisely because a lot of ingredients weren't frequently available in the early years. I think I remember that when we first came we couldn't get prosciutto, for example.
I come often in NY City. Close by where I live is big fruit market. Now is the season of apples and outside there are crates with apples, visibly appealing, large sizes, healthy looking. Until you taste them! What a disappointment when I compare with my country of origin apples. I think they come from New York area, but it must be the soil. So I insist quality of food depends where the ingredients are coming from. England imports large amounts of food from elsewhere, so it could be their food nowadays taste good. In Mediterranean area there are about 300 sunny days per year so every food has enough heat and light to be ripe. I don't think that's the case with English produce
 
BBC Nov. 4 2019 - The World’s oldest-known Recipes Decoded

...from Yale University’s Babylonian Collection

.... A team of international scholars versed in culinary history, food chemistry and cuneiform studies has been recreating dishes from the world’s oldest-known recipes ...

... The instructions for lamb stew read more like a list of ingredients than a bona fide recipe: “Meat is used. You prepare water. You add fine-grained salt, dried barley cakes, onion, Persian shallot, and milk. You crush and add leek and garlic.” But it’s impossible to ask the chef to reveal the missing pieces: This recipe’s writer has been dead for some 4,000 years.

Instead, a team of international scholars versed in culinary history, food chemistry and cuneiform (the Babylonian system of writing first developed by the ancient Sumerians of Mesopotamia) have been working to recreate this dish and three others from the world’s oldest-known recipes. It’s a sort of culinary archaeology that uses tablets from Yale University’s Babylonian Collection to gain a deeper understanding of that culture through the lens of taste...

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20191103-the-worlds-oldest-known-recipes-decoded
 
To find good quality Snails, after a night of drizzling or light rain, people would go early in the morning in the massive artichoke fields near the town of Brindisi (about 30 Km from my town in Italy).

After that, they fed the Snails white flour for a couple of days, only then were ready to be cooked or sold.

For longer lasting, they would put the Snails in boxes with dirt and white flour, eventually, the Snails would retreat in their shells by forming a dry white seal.
Add water to wake them up :)

Yes, we do it that way too.

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I think that is how the hunters began to make friends with the farmers.

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There are even fairs like this one in Córdoba with 46 stalls selling snails.

We also like this smaller "cabrillas" variety and with those lists we like them very much, with a broth made with herbs and thistles from the field, they are delicious as well as the drunk broth.
 
I come often in NY City. Close by where I live is big fruit market. Now is the season of apples and outside there are crates with apples, visibly appealing, large sizes, healthy looking. Until you taste them! What a disappointment when I compare with my country of origin apples. I think they come from New York area, but it must be the soil. So I insist quality of food depends where the ingredients are coming from. England imports large amounts of food from elsewhere, so it could be their food nowadays taste good. In Mediterranean area there are about 300 sunny days per year so every food has enough heat and light to be ripe. I don't think that's the case with English produce

It's not the case with American produce either. Plus, they pick the fruit when it's not ripe to account for the time that will be eaten up by transport and stocking in supermarkets.

It's more than the soil, and the shorter growing time, however.

They've changed the varieties for visual appeal or size and sometimes flavor is sacrificed. That's the case with tomatoes, which are absolutely terrible in the U.S. in my opinion. The ones I buy from farm stands on Long Island in August and September have ripened on the vine, but they're still nowhere as flavorful as they are in Italy or other countries bordering the Med.

This is what they wanted visually and for ease in transport (they don't bruise as easily), but they bred the flavor right out of them.
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Some local farmers have gone back to what they call "heirloom tomatoes", which are not uniform at all, but are better tasting, and for whatever reason the cherry tomatoes are still good. Hard to slice cherry tomatoes
for a sandwich, though. :)

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Even with Italian tomatoes, however, the rich, volcanic soil of the areas of Campania near Vesuvio produce tomatoes that are better than any others I've ever eaten. All the produce in Campania is fabulous. Ours in the north doesn't compare at all, although infinitely better than what I can get here. Their seafood is much, much better as well, although the Adriatic coast aquatic resources come close.
 
I love British foods and love to visit best restaurants for dinner and by using restaurant discount codes getting a big discount.
 

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