Cornwall: King Artur's Land (Photos)

julia90

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megalite-di-lanyon-quiot.jpg


men-an-tol.jpg


castello-di-pendennis.jpg


spiaggia-di-polzeath.jpg


castello-di-restormel.jpg


villaggio-di-st-ives.jpg


isola-di-stmartins.jpg


castello-di-tintagel.jpg
 
Thanks for these, Julia, I love Cornwall. My matrilineal ancestors come from St. Agnes, very beautiful area.
 
Gorgeous photos but, unfortunately Arthur is just a fairy tale. If he did actually exist (even though there is no proof) I think Devonshire or even the Welsh may have something to say as to who he belonged to.
 
Gorgeous photos but, unfortunately Arthur is just a fairy tale. If he did actually exist (even though there is no proof) I think Devonshire or even the Welsh may have something to say as to who he belonged to.

If Arthur existed (he didn't) he would have lived during a time when Dumnonia was united, so if he was Dumnonian, Cornwall and Devon (and probably Somerset and Dorset, or at least parts of them) would have to share.

Cornwall, though, does have the strongest claim to being the successor state to Dumnonia, as it was never incorporated into Wessex without special autonomy like Devon was.
 
If Arthur existed (he didn't) he would have lived during a time when Dumnonia was united, so if he was Dumnonian, Cornwall and Devon (and probably Somerset and Dorset, or at least parts of them) would have to share.

Cornwall, though, does have the strongest claim to being the successor state to Dumnonia, as it was never incorporated into Wessex without special autonomy like Devon was.

Oh, of course Arthur existed, he just exists in the realm of mythology rather than that of history, which is great, because mythological characters are much more real than historical ones in my opinion (who wants a history book instead of a fairy story?)... One of the great peculiarities of modern society is drawing a distinction between "existence" and "non-existence"
 
Isn't it thought that King Arthur's court was in Wales?
 
Oh, of course Arthur existed, he just exists in the realm of mythology rather than that of history, which is great, because mythological characters are much more real than historical ones in my opinion (who wants a history book instead of a fairy story?)... One of the great peculiarities of modern society is drawing a distinction between "existence" and "non-existence"

Mmm, a thought provoking reply Asturrulumbo. Although, I for one would much prefer a history book instead of mythology and fairy tales as I don't find what was not real interesting at all. But all that is merely personal preference.

I like a distinction between existance and non-existance also but I'd add that... one of the great peculiarities of modern society is the necessity (by some) to force mythological figures into the realms of factual history. Both the Arthur and Jesus myths are very good examples of the phenonomen.
 
Great pics indeed, it shows The UK still has a long way to go to promote the different regions. Most Europeans shrink the UK to london, Liverpool, Manchester and somewhere in-between, the Lake District.
 

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