E-v12 > cts6667

JCosmos

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I'm looking into an origin of E-CTS6667, which is downstream from E-V12.

I belong to the E-FT264693 subclade, of which there is a sicillian branch and an Iraqi Jewish branch (which I am of).

Ancient DNA shows 2 Roman samples,
Villa Magna 59
Paisiello 113

Would the branch be originally Levantine and spread by the Romans?

Thanks.
 
I'm looking into an origin of E-CTS6667, which is downstream from E-V12.

I belong to the E-FT264693 subclade, of which there is a sicillian branch and an Iraqi Jewish branch (which I am of).

Ancient DNA shows 2 Roman samples,
Villa Magna 59
Paisiello 113

Would the branch be originally Levantine and spread by the Romans?

Thanks.

In general one should look at Anatolia, Fertile Crescent and Egypt as the point of disbursal for the current distribution of most e1b1b older subclades.


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I'm looking into an origin of E-CTS6667, which is downstream from E-V12.

I belong to the E-FT264693 subclade, of which there is a sicillian branch and an Iraqi Jewish branch (which I am of).

Ancient DNA shows 2 Roman samples,
Villa Magna 59
Paisiello 113

Would the branch be originally Levantine and spread by the Romans?

Thanks.

e-v12 very likely originated in egypt
but some of his downstream look more levantine
https://www.yfull.com/tree/E-CTS6667/
and probably arrived to italy and rest of europe from the levant rather than from egypt

your specific downstream is found in iraqi jews ( who are old community with presence in mesopotamia for 2000 years )

https://jewishdna.net/E1b-V12.html

https://jewishdna.net/AB-190.html


p.s
the fact downstreams of e-v12 found in different jewish diaspora communities show
that it did had some bronze age presence in the levant
(also an ancient remain from extreme north syria ALA136 individual was e-v12)
https://www.theytree.com/usersample/4436bec40d17f53fc3fe3b6aa4ee5c59.html
https://www.theytree.com/tree/E-CTS1239


david bush user anthrogenica:
ALA136.png
 
Last edited:
e-v12 very likely originated in egypt
but some of his downstream look more levantine
https://www.yfull.com/tree/E-CTS6667/
and probably arrived to italy and rest of europe from the levant rather than from egypt

your specific downstream is found in iraqi jews ( who are old community with presence in mesopotamia for 2000 years )

https://jewishdna.net/E1b-V12.html

https://jewishdna.net/AB-190.html


p.s
the fact downstreams of e-v12 found in different jewish diaspora communities show
that it did had some bronze age presence in the levant
(also an ancient remain from extreme north syria ALA136 individual was e-v12)
https://www.theytree.com/usersample/4436bec40d17f53fc3fe3b6aa4ee5c59.html
https://www.theytree.com/tree/E-CTS1239


There are many explanations. Egypt was Hellenised at some point, it is also possible that some Egyptian Greeks had this Y-DNA, and dispersed to Europe.
 
There are many explanations. Egypt was Hellenised at some point, it is also possible that some Egyptian Greeks had this Y-DNA, and dispersed to Europe.

do you think e-v12 presence in south italy and sicily could be connected to phoenicians ?
 
Is E-v12 have been found in Punic and Phoenician samples?


we don't know yet
but there is a future dna paper on 13 phoenician sites
and it should answere this question and other questions
can't wait for this paper :;)

The story of Phoenician populations across the Mediterranean told through ancient DNA

Harald Ringbauer1,3, Ayelet Salman-Minkov2 , Iñigo Olalde3,4, Alissa Mitnick3 , Tomer Peled2 , Arie Shaus3 , Maria Bofill3 , Rebecca Bernardos3 , Nasreen Broomandkhoshbacht3 , Kim Callan3 , Elizabeth Curtis3 , Aisling Kearns3 , Ann Marie Lawson3 , Matthew Mah3 , Swapan Mallick3 , Adam Micco3 , Jonas Oppenheimer3 , Liju Qiu3 , Kristin Stewardson3 , Noah Workman3 , Fatma Zalzala3 , Nicholas Márquez-Grant3,5, Antonio M. Sáez Romero3,6, María Luisa Lavado Florido3,6, Juan Manuel Jimenez Arenas3,7, Isidro Jorge Toro Moyano3,8, Enrique Viguera3,9 , Jose Suarez Padilla3,10, Alicia Rodero Riaza3,11, Patricia Smith3,12, Marina Faerman3,12, Luca Sineo3,13, Gioacchino Falsone3,14, Davide Pettener3,15, Peter Van Dommelen3,16, Francesca Oliveri3,17, Pamela Toti3,18, Valentina Giuliana3,19, Alon Barash3,20, Liran Carmel3,21, Elisabetta Cilli3,22, Anna Chiara Fariselli3,22, Donata Luiselli3,22, Brendan Culleton3,23, Elisabetta Boaretto3,24, Nadin Rohland3 , Alfredo Coppa3,25, David Caramelli3,26, Ron Pinhasi3,27, Carles Lalueza-Fox3,29, Dalit Regev3,28 , Ilan Gronau2 , David Reich3 1Department of Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany; 2Efi Arazi School of Computer Science, Reichman University, Israel; 3Department of Human Genetics, Harvard Medical School, USA; 4Biomics Research Group, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Spain; 5Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Cranfield Forensic Institute, Cranfield University, UK; 6Department of Prehistory and Archaeology, University of Seville, Spain; 7Department of Prehistory and Archaeology, University of Granada, Spain; 8Archaeological Museum of Granada, Spain; 9Department of Cellular Biology, Genetics, and Physiology, University of Malaga, Spain; 10Department of Historical Sciences, University of Malaga, Spain; 11Department of Protohistory and Colonizations, Nat, Spain; 12Hadassah Faculty of Dental Medicine, Hebrew University, Israel; 13Department of Biological Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, University of Palermo, Italy; 14Department of Culture and Society, University of Palermo, Italy; 15Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy; 16Joukowsky Institute of Archaeology, Brown University, USA; 17Sicily Region, Ministry of Cultural Heritage, Italy; 18The Giuseppe Whitaker Foundation, --, Italy; 19Department of Archaeology, University of Palermo, Italy; 20The Azrieli Faculty of Medicine, Bar Ilan University, Israel; 21The Alex Silberman Institute of Life Science, Hebrew University, Israel; 22Department of Cultural Heritage, University of Bologna, Italy; 23Institute of Energy and the Environment, Pennsylvania State University, USA; 24Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel; 25Department of Human and Animal Biology, University of Rome, Italy; 26Department of Biology, University of Florence, Italy; 27Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Australia; 28Israel Antiquities Authority, --, Israel; 29Department of Evolutionary Biology, Pompeu Fabra University, Spain

Phoenicians played a central role in establishing trade routes throughout the Mediterranean during the second and first millennia BCE, with settlements spread from their homeland in the Levant all the way west to the Iberian Peninsula.However, due to the lack of primary written records, our knowledge about Phoenician people is quite limited. Ancient DNA can finally help us tell their story. We sequenced 150 genomes from 13 different Phoenician sites: four sites from the Iberian Peninsula and nearby islands, six from Sicily and Sardinia, two from North Africa, and one site from the Levant. Our data set spans a time range from the 8th century BCE until the Roman imperial period. We find that during this time period, Phoenicians from the Central and Western Mediterranean did not share significant ancestry with Phoenicians from the Levant. Populations 34 from all 12 sites sampled outside of the Levant appear to attribute most of their ancestry to Bronze Age populations in the Central Mediterranean (Sicily or Greece). We also find evidence of North African ancestry in individuals from various sites, likely facilitated by the Phoenician presence in North Africa. The proportion of North African ancestry appears to significantly increase during the height of Carthage in the 4th and 3rd centuries BCE. We used long shared genomic segments to reconstruct a network of familial relationships within some of these sites. Interestingly, we also find family relationships between individuals from North Africa and individuals from Sicily, demonstrating the high mobility of Phoenicians across the Mediterranean.
 
we don't know yet
but there is a future dna paper on 13 phoenician sites
and it should answere this question and other questions
can't wait for this paper :;)

The story of Phoenician populations across the Mediterranean told through ancient DNA

Harald Ringbauer1,3, Ayelet Salman-Minkov2 , Iñigo Olalde3,4, Alissa Mitnick3 , Tomer Peled2 , Arie Shaus3 , Maria Bofill3 , Rebecca Bernardos3 , Nasreen Broomandkhoshbacht3 , Kim Callan3 , Elizabeth Curtis3 , Aisling Kearns3 , Ann Marie Lawson3 , Matthew Mah3 , Swapan Mallick3 , Adam Micco3 , Jonas Oppenheimer3 , Liju Qiu3 , Kristin Stewardson3 , Noah Workman3 , Fatma Zalzala3 , Nicholas Márquez-Grant3,5, Antonio M. Sáez Romero3,6, María Luisa Lavado Florido3,6, Juan Manuel Jimenez Arenas3,7, Isidro Jorge Toro Moyano3,8, Enrique Viguera3,9 , Jose Suarez Padilla3,10, Alicia Rodero Riaza3,11, Patricia Smith3,12, Marina Faerman3,12, Luca Sineo3,13, Gioacchino Falsone3,14, Davide Pettener3,15, Peter Van Dommelen3,16, Francesca Oliveri3,17, Pamela Toti3,18, Valentina Giuliana3,19, Alon Barash3,20, Liran Carmel3,21, Elisabetta Cilli3,22, Anna Chiara Fariselli3,22, Donata Luiselli3,22, Brendan Culleton3,23, Elisabetta Boaretto3,24, Nadin Rohland3 , Alfredo Coppa3,25, David Caramelli3,26, Ron Pinhasi3,27, Carles Lalueza-Fox3,29, Dalit Regev3,28 , Ilan Gronau2 , David Reich3 1Department of Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany; 2Efi Arazi School of Computer Science, Reichman University, Israel; 3Department of Human Genetics, Harvard Medical School, USA; 4Biomics Research Group, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Spain; 5Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Cranfield Forensic Institute, Cranfield University, UK; 6Department of Prehistory and Archaeology, University of Seville, Spain; 7Department of Prehistory and Archaeology, University of Granada, Spain; 8Archaeological Museum of Granada, Spain; 9Department of Cellular Biology, Genetics, and Physiology, University of Malaga, Spain; 10Department of Historical Sciences, University of Malaga, Spain; 11Department of Protohistory and Colonizations, Nat, Spain; 12Hadassah Faculty of Dental Medicine, Hebrew University, Israel; 13Department of Biological Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, University of Palermo, Italy; 14Department of Culture and Society, University of Palermo, Italy; 15Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy; 16Joukowsky Institute of Archaeology, Brown University, USA; 17Sicily Region, Ministry of Cultural Heritage, Italy; 18The Giuseppe Whitaker Foundation, --, Italy; 19Department of Archaeology, University of Palermo, Italy; 20The Azrieli Faculty of Medicine, Bar Ilan University, Israel; 21The Alex Silberman Institute of Life Science, Hebrew University, Israel; 22Department of Cultural Heritage, University of Bologna, Italy; 23Institute of Energy and the Environment, Pennsylvania State University, USA; 24Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel; 25Department of Human and Animal Biology, University of Rome, Italy; 26Department of Biology, University of Florence, Italy; 27Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Australia; 28Israel Antiquities Authority, --, Israel; 29Department of Evolutionary Biology, Pompeu Fabra University, Spain

Phoenicians played a central role in establishing trade routes throughout the Mediterranean during the second and first millennia BCE, with settlements spread from their homeland in the Levant all the way west to the Iberian Peninsula.However, due to the lack of primary written records, our knowledge about Phoenician people is quite limited. Ancient DNA can finally help us tell their story. We sequenced 150 genomes from 13 different Phoenician sites: four sites from the Iberian Peninsula and nearby islands, six from Sicily and Sardinia, two from North Africa, and one site from the Levant. Our data set spans a time range from the 8th century BCE until the Roman imperial period. We find that during this time period, Phoenicians from the Central and Western Mediterranean did not share significant ancestry with Phoenicians from the Levant. Populations 34 from all 12 sites sampled outside of the Levant appear to attribute most of their ancestry to Bronze Age populations in the Central Mediterranean (Sicily or Greece). We also find evidence of North African ancestry in individuals from various sites, likely facilitated by the Phoenician presence in North Africa. The proportion of North African ancestry appears to significantly increase during the height of Carthage in the 4th and 3rd centuries BCE. We used long shared genomic segments to reconstruct a network of familial relationships within some of these sites. Interestingly, we also find family relationships between individuals from North Africa and individuals from Sicily, demonstrating the high mobility of Phoenicians across the Mediterranean.


Thanks for sharing. Well, only one seems to be a Phoenican site, 12 out of 13 are most likely Punic.
 

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