Is Turkey a Western country ? OFFTOPIC @ Spain & Mexico

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OK, @Lynx everybody knows that Spain is the most unproductive and uncompetitive country in the EU... living on Taxpayers of other European countries.

http://www.economist.com/world/europe/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15503246

... besides incresingly being seen in Latin America as a country that does the most lowly and lying shamelessly, to please the United States.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xcx1t0_59-segundos-cuba_news?start=3

+++++++++++++

On the contrary, Turkey is seen as the country of the Future:




Source: http://www.trt.net.tr/International/newsDetail.aspx?HaberKodu=27f64e3d-5731-4809-954b-8adc1c793b0f

I do not believe that Europe is going down as this author say... however, I believe he is right about Turkey...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12eNAovkDTM

++++++++++

Why don't you do a try and go to Google and type sentences like

"Turkey Superpower" or "Türkei Weltmacht" ?

http://www.google.com.mx/search?hl=es&safe=off&q=Turkey+Supepower&meta=&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=

http://www.google.com.mx/search?hl=es&safe=off&q=T%C3%BCrkei+Weltmacht&meta=&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=

And you know, when people made such sentences, it could be serious... at least you could entertain the possibility.

(Try to make write "Spain Worldpower" (not refering to a dinstant past) without laughing out loud. )

Regards.


Excuse me, what body of reference are you utilizing to support your making such an outlandish statement as Spain is "the most unproductive and uncompetitive country in the EU"? Certainly nothing of the kind is written in the Economist article you presented.

Do you have a propensity to construct alternate "realities"? :rolleyes:
 
This Moctezuma never ceases to amaze. As much he makes a fool of himself he always come back to show more of his retarded mind.

You are really giving a great image of your people and your country. Seek for medical help for your spanish-phobic. Looser.
 
Excuse me, what body of reference are you utilizing to support your making such an outlandish statement as Spain is "the most unproductive and uncompetitive country in the EU?? Certainly nothing of the kind is written in the Economist article you presented.

Do you have a propensity to construct alternate "realities"? :rolleyes:

Ignore the frijolito. First he says we are going off-topic all the time and when I post an article he has no reply for he start talking about Spain and its economy.

No wonder why americans are really feed up with this people.
 
Hey Sirius, since you appear to like Turkey so much, why don't you just move there?
 
If Turkey is going to be a future super-power by their own why are they so desperate for being a EU member? It has no sense. :LOL:

But of course this is too much complicated for the sick mind of a frijolito. :LOL:
 
yes, wonder why so latin americans move to Spain, why they don't go to Turkey if its so great economically ?
 
Hey Sirius, since you appear to like Turkey so much, why don't you just move there?

I know that was a rethorical question, but he should actually. Even Afghanistan is a safer place to live than Narco-land (Mexico) right now. :innocent:
 
yes, wonder why so mexicans move to Spain, why they don't go to Turkey if its so great ?

We have 2 millions of latin americans in Spain (pretty amazing for a country that is "living on Taxpayers of other European countries" according to our bitter mexican friend) but the mexican collective is very small actually. We have to thanks the U.S.A. for that.

usa-mexico-border.jpg
(y)
 
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Very typical. When a frijolito feels humiliated by a spaniard he uses another country to try to humillate us. It has to be really sad not having anything about your own country to be proud of. :LOL:

I'm not surprised that Germany is so interested in Turkey, they have like 3 millions of turkish immigrants... still less than the amount of mexican immigrants USA has to deal with. :innocent:

Hey! Maybe USA should do a documentary about Mexico inminent future as a super-power. :LOL:
 
It's true: While Spain endangers the economic health of Europe...

http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1962142,00.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Spain

... Turkey is growing fast, and displays a very activ and visionary diplomacy.
Endanger the economic health of Europe ? You are such a lier, why don't you talk about the situation of Ireland who went bankrupt with a -9% growth rate, or the situation of Iceland ?? , who is part of the European Economical Area

A documental and inteview in the German television about the expectatives of Turkey as a Super Power...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6niI2GUUaw

(I wonder how he missed to speak about "Superpower Iberia" :D :D
Because Spain is already a superpower, it is 9th in GDP :

Nominal_GDP_IMF_2008_millions_of_USD.jpg
 
:D :D :D

Overinflated economy... (No wondering why you have 20% unemployment, the most desperate situation in many decades)

In this other Wikipedia article about (PPP GDP, i.e. real production) is Spain below of Mexico...

PPP_GDP_IMF_2008_millions_of_USD.jpg


Here, take a look...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP)

:D :D :D


"
Spain: Bleak forecast puts unemployment at 22% in 2010

Submitted by Edward Harrison of Credit Writedowns.
Citigroup has just released a forecast which is very troubling in regards to employment and growth in the Spanish economy. With unemployment already having hit 17.9%, Citigroup expects layoffs to increase this to 22% in 2010. "
 
Let's remember why this pitiful being can't stop thinking about spaniards and acting like a jerk:

Mexico Slow to Confront Racial Issues, Experts Say

Lennox Samuels, Dallas Morning News

MEXICO CITY—The man visiting from the south of Spain was having a revelation as he walked along Michoacan Street in the city’s fashionable Condesa section.

“There are an awful lot of brown people on the street,” he exclaimed. “You don’t get that at all from the mexican TV and advertising.”

Foreigners in Mexico City who look at Mexican television—or movies or magazines or anything with human faces on it—could be excused for thinking they had landed in a European city.

Officially, Mexico’s population is mestizaje—a mixture of White and Indian, or mestizos. But the country’s political, business, social and cultural elite is dominated by White descendants of Spanish conquistadors, while mixed-race, indigenous and Black people generally are relegated to supporting roles in society.


Mexico has taken major steps toward democracy but lags significantly on civil rights, analysts say. The nation, they say, harbors racism and is years away from addressing it because few in positions of power understand or even acknowledge the situation, and many of those affected by it have long accepted the status quo.

But Indian activist Abel Barrera said indigenous people have long been at the bottom of society.

“They are considered second-class persons,” said Barrera, director of the Human Rights Center in Tlapa, Guerrero. “Throughout history, they have been stigmatized for their languages, religious expressions and culture.”

In a speech recently, Fox sought to embrace the Indians.

“Cultural diversity of the indigenous people is an essential part of our national being and enriches us as a nation,” he said. “The indigenous people in Mexico are not part of the past; they belong in the present, and together we are building the future.”

Neither he nor any other top official has made such a statement about Black people. No one even has a firm idea how many Blacks there are in the country, although the government estimates 500,000 Afro-Mexicans live along the Costa Chica, which covers the states of Guerrero and Oaxaca.

Most history textbooks have little if any reference to Mexican Blacks, who were brought into the country by the Spanish. Sintesis de la Historia de Mexico (Synthesis of Mexico’s History), a textbook used in junior high school, devotes less than one of its 405 pages to Black Mexicans.

http://www.nusd.k12.az.us/schools/n...ico/Mexico.slow.to.confront.racial.issues.pdf
 
Here's another issue in which Mexico surpass us.

povert4.gif


Congrats Sirious.
 
About the mexican GDP:


Mexico's War on Drugs: A War on the Economy?

Posted on September 8, 2008 by Leah Hazard

Mexican President Felipe Calderon's war on drugs targets the drug cartels that constitute a large portion of Mexico’s economy. Drug trafficking is an estimated US$50 billion a year business there. In fact, one study reported that the loss of the drug business would shrink Mexico's economy by 63 percent.

These statistics seem to beg the question: Can Mexico eliminate its drug trade without inflicting too much damage on its own economy?
The drug war's economic impact isn't necessarily positive, either. The Mexican government estimates that the jump in violence resulting from its crackdown on drugs has taken a percentage point off the country's economic growth. Costs for Mexican businesses, who need increased security, have increased by 5 to 10 percent.

But the cost in human lives is readily apparent. Earlier this year, for example, two children and a police officer's wife were murdered as Tijuana schools and neighborhoods were evacuated in the search of a drug-cartel official. The murders came in retaliation for the arrest of other cartel members days before. In August, gunmen killed 13 people — including a baby — when they opened fire in a dance hall. And kidnappings are now commonplace.

Mexico's drug war has resulted in over 4,000 drug-related deaths since 2006, including Mexico City’s federal police chief and 400 other police officers.

Last weekend tens of thousands of Mexicans gathered to protest the bloodshed. But despite the violence, residents of Badiraguato, considered the heart of the drug trade, told Newsweek they don't want trafficking to end.
"The drug traffickers do good things here. They employ people. There's no corn, no beans here — the people here are all about drugs," said 22-year-old Jos? de Jes?s Landell Garc?a, who co-owns a shoe shop with his father. He added that most of his friends took up employment with the drug cartels "because it was the only thing they could do."
Calderon's government faces a nasty predicament. How does Mexico dismantle a system so firmly entrenched in the state and the economy? For starters, at least, it will require steps to increase Mexicans' faith in their government — particularly in its ability to offer them good-paying jobs in licit trades.
http://www.globalenvision.org/2008/09/08/mexicos-war-drugs-war-economy

Now I get the meaning of the word "Narco-State". :areh:
 
Spain: Bleak forecast puts unemployment at 22% in 2010

Submitted by Edward Harrison of Credit Writedowns.
Citigroup has just released a forecast which is very troubling in regards to employment and growth in the Spanish economy. With unemployment already having hit 17.9%, Citigroup expects layoffs to increase this to 22% in 2010. "

Yes we know. My government is offering money to unemployed immigrants to leave Spain: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/jul/21/spain

But they don't want to leave. Apparently they prefer to be a poor in my country than to be a poor in Latin America. Probably the same thinking of all those mexicans in poverty in the U.S.A.
 
I would ask this rather fundamental question of everyone participating on Eupedia: Would you want to be living in Mexico today? :innocent:
 
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