It's Time For A Two State Solution by ibx2cat

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An interesting video I found while browsing YouTube. I do enjoy comparing and contrasting things. It's perhaps one of the reasons why I enjoy history a lot. There has been a great deal of rhyming and repeating patterns throughout human history. My stance on the recent geopolitical conflict in the near east is still neutral and not what I want to discuss in this thread which is referred to and about in the video. I don't know if he wanted to go down the rabbit hole of that region and go further back in time. He ignores Germanic expansion in late antiquity to that region. Also I'm not to sure about where the historical borders of Celtic Gaul was but I think the Netherlands was more outside the border and where the Germanic Frisii lived. Flanders on the other hand, I think, falls within the borders of historical Gaul; someone here can please clarify/correct me if I'm wrong.
 
It varies according to interpretations of archeology, of toponymy and of tribes names. The proto-Celtic influence could have reached the Rhine mouth (in far South of the Netherlands) or even further in North near today Amsterdam.
But the Batavi, known by Romans were living before Frisii at the Rhine mouth and was/are seen as Germanics. Belgia was peopled by diverse tribes, but their statute is not clear. Someones were Celts, others maybe Germanics, and other are supposed having spoken IE dialects considered as between Celtic and Italic spite rather Italic-like or pan-Italic.
Genetically the precedent stage was surely a post-nothern-BB one with CWC input rising as the more northwards man goes, I think. Some of the old scholars thought the most of Belgae tribes (Belgia) were come from Bavaria/western Bohemia, so not from genuine Gaul/Gallia. I don't know what is said todate.
We have to keep in mind that Belgium and the Netherlands of the BC times had a lot of their shores drown under the sea, so they were smaller than todate. And at the opposite side, Belgae tribes occuped large parts of today northern and eastern France, until the Seine/Sequanna river.
 
It varies according to interpretations of archeology, of toponymy and of tribes names. The proto-Celtic influence could have reached the Rhine mouth (in far South of the Netherlands) or even further in North near today Amsterdam.
But the Batavi, known by Romans were living before Frisii at the Rhine mouth and was/are seen as Germanics. Belgia was peopled by diverse tribes, but their statute is not clear. Someones were Celts, others maybe Germanics, and other are supposed having spoken IE dialects considered as between Celtic and Italic spite rather Italic-like or pan-Italic.
Genetically the precedent stage was surely a post-nothern-BB one with CWC input rising as the more northwards man goes, I think. Some of the old scholars thought the most of Belgae tribes (Belgia) were come from Bavaria/western Bohemia, so not from genuine Gaul/Gallia. I don't know what is said todate.
We have to keep in mind that Belgium and the Netherlands of the BC times had a lot of their shores drown under the sea, so they were smaller than todate. And at the opposite side, Belgae tribes occuped large parts of today northern and eastern France, until the Seine/Sequanna river.
I forgot about the Batavi! From what I've read there isn't any consensus on the Belgae whether they were 100% Celtic or Celtic majority and some Germanic migration. I'd like to think there were Celts, maybe culturally influenced a bit by the nearby Germanic tribes. The name Belgae is speculated to come from an old Celtic word Bolgi mean "to Swell" assumed to mean to swell with anger.
 
Yes this Celtic 'bolg-' root has taken the meaning of bag or full bag, or 'bogue' or 'chesnut bur', 'bolc'h' in Breton, 'bola' in Welsh (through *bolgh) the Gaulish gave 'bouge' and 'bouget' (diminutive) in Old French, so 'budget' in English.
 
A little mistake above: bouge is old French - The Gaulish word was something like *bolg- - Of course you had corrected!
 

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