Kosovo: Albanian Anti-Ottoman revolt (1690)

I am talking about Kosova and not Vlora or Albania proper. I am not sure how nationalist sources from the 17th century are cheap nationalist propaganda. None of these sources support that Albanians in Kosova are Ottoman transplants or loyal servants. It is completely rubbish. They talk even of Serbs in Kosova joining Ottoman forces. You did not provide a single historical evidence for any of your claims. Albanians in Kosova and Northern Albania led an anti-Ottoman resistance in 1690 and later. They do not speak of vast majority of people joining Ottoman forces. The Albanian Catholic Archbishop led an anti-Ottoman resistance yet in Serbian sources it is claimed it was the Serbian Orthodox Arsenije who then supposedly led 30,000 - 40,000 Serbsa out of Kosova, in some sources they claim 100,000's yet there is no historical evidence for this.
None of these sources mention the Serbian Arsenije.



Clementa = Kelmendi .... There is no mention of any Arsenije. Other sources mention the Archbishop of Albania. Prizren is mentioned as capital of Albania.

The Balkan Wars came after an Albanian revolt in Kosova in 1912 which weakened the Ottoman Empire https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albanian_revolt_of_1912 , The Ottoman Empire in Kosova and Macedonia was practically defeated by Albanians according to other sources.


In Kosova is where the Albanian national movement began such as the League of Prizren, League of Peja etc, it first seeked greater rights within the empire then later independence. None of these sources support that we were loyal servants or the only servants or that we terrorized Serbs or that we were transplanted in Kosova.

Those Pashas and people you are talking about mainly took advantage of their circumstances, they served the Ottoman empire to get a carrier within the military or as officers then when the time came they also changed sides. It was like this with all nationalities. I don't think you even understood the word 'loyal servant' here. The Austrians also mistreated people. They burned down Skopje. In Skopje there were recorded 3,000 Jews that fled because of the Austrians. Yes many of these Albanians that revolted had been paid wages as soldiers by Ottomans but they weren't 'loyal servants' , they were people that adopted to their circumstances to make a life.

Just like people joined the Roman Empire when the Romans occupied the Balkans, people adopted Latin and served the Romans eventually despite they had revolted against the Romans, the Roman Empire eventually also collapsed. This does not make you a 'loyal servant' . People joined based on their interests.

None of these sources support the Balkans had supposedly ethno-nationalist conflicts before the 19th-20th century.

Loyal servant or “Sadik” is a consideration that should be seen with the eyes of Turks/ottomans not Albanians. For that you should read ottoman archives. With all the evidence you provided, It seems that only Albanians from Albanian were loyal servants not Albanians Kosovars. Albanian from Albania declared independence and two years latter asked for a Turkish prince, lowered the Albanian flag in Durres and raised the Turkish one, if this is not a proof worth considering, I don’t know what is.






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After the Albanian revolt of 1912 some sources pretty much state the Ottoman Empire was defeated like for example Aubrey Herbert writes that it was Albanians who defeated the Ottomans and not the Serbs, Bulgarians or Greeks, when the Serbs crossed over into Kosova, Macedonia and Albania or at the time what was 'Ethnic Albania', they met mostly an Albanian resistance. I have a book that talks about this.

Other Balkan nations such as Serbs certainly never liberated us. They committed massacres and occupied Albanian lands. The Greek War of Independence had Orthodox Albanians fighting in their ranks also.

Also what about Cerciz Topulli https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Çerçiz_Topulli ?

Topulli is the exemption not the rule, he had few man. The elites (pasha/ bej) did not support war for independence.
In 1912 Ottomans were in war with Italy, which Ottomans lost.
Never said Serb liberated us, Austrian did.
But if no Balkan war I seriously doubt that we could become indipendente since the Austrian did not want the Ottoman Empire to collapse.

Why Kudistan was never liberated they are still fighting for Freedom?



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Once again I have to repeat myself,

In Kosova/Northern Albania far more people supported the Austrians than Ottomans. You can just look at the numbers.
Prizren was an Albanian town. Western Kosova had an Albanian majority yet you claim this is nationalistic nonsense when we are literally using sources from the 17th century ? It seems Serbian propaganda really got into your head. There is no evidence that our people were ever loyal Ottoman servants while people like the Serbs were supposedly oppressed people who constantly fought the Ottomans. This is exactly what is complete nationalistic nonsense actually and is based on nothing but racism, depicting us as some kind of terrorist alien Islamic people while the 'Chrsitian Serbs' as oppressed and Europes chosen people that were pushed out from Kosova. Many Christians served the Ottomans. In fact they preferred them to stay Christian so they would also pay taxes.

Catholics among the Ottomans came to be despised largely because the Austrians were Catholics and the Albanian Catholics of Northern Albania and Kosova that led some of these revolts with both Christian and Muslim Albanians.

There is a difference between being a servant and being a loyal servant, just because you're a servant doesn't make you loyal.

When Albanians fought Skanderbeg under the Ottomans they were 'loyal' servants ? Why would we be 'loyal' when they committed attrocities ? When the Austrians committed crimes people stopped being loyal to the Austrians.


Balkan Wars happened largely thanks to the Albanian revolt of 1912. It's true that we didn't seek initially independence from the Ottomans but more rights. You seem to be unaware of many of the revolts against Ottomans that happened in Albania and Kosovo in the 1800's and 1900's.


You pulled out some Pashas of Albania as supposedly some evidence and some people that served in the Ottoman ranks. Yes many Albanians served in Ottoman ranks as did Janissaries, many Albanians moved to Turkey, this certainly has absolutely no proof that Albanians were loyal servants while other Balkan nations such as Serbs supposedly were oppressed people that constantly fought against Ottoman occupation, many Albanians also opposed the Ottomans when given chance. Many Balkan Slavs served in the Ottoman ranks too even if the number of Albanians was greater, it is certainly no proof that Albanians are Ottoman transplants and the 'Christian Serbs' oppressed and rebellious people.

If you had actually bothered reading what I wrote it was a response to Tim Judah's claim that this revolt in 1690 was a Serbian revolt and that after 1690 the demographics began to change into Albanian thanks to 'loyal Albanian servants' of the Ottomans. The texts I provided prove this is rubbish yet you claim this is all nationalistic nonsense ?
 
Overall Albanians were considered loyal servant. At the end of the day we wanted to replace a German prince with a Turkish one two years after Declaration of Independence.
That should tell us all something.
I am not sure if we could ever get rid of the Ottoman Empire if was not for the Balkan Wars.
There were some people that wanted change and looked toward West, but majority of the elites were fully ottoman. Look at Vlora family, and you will understand the connection the feudal families of Albanian had with Istambul. They only jumped the ottoman ship after it was seeking with the help of the Austrians.

The rest is cheap nationalist propaganda.


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You are mixing two different periods with over 200 years in between. For the period we are talking about, Albanians in Kosove were predominantly Catholic. Especially in the rural regions.
 
You are mixing two different periods with over 200 years in between. For the period we are talking about, Albanians in Kosove were predominantly Catholic. Especially in the rural regions.

Many Albanians in Kosova were already Muslims actually. Prizren in Kosova was mostly Muslim Albanian, so was Vushtrri etc. Many of these people who revolted were Muslim and they are mentioned as Muslim who had formerly fought in the Ottoman ranks and were paid wages, some are mentioned as faithless, some sources mention them as both Muslim and Christians. There are Serbs mentioned also and they also mention Serbs in the Ottoman ranks.

Though you are right there were also Catholics. But there were also Catholics from Northern Albania that came assist if you read Noel Malcolm's essay on this.

The guy has absolutely no idea what he is talking about. In Serbian and Western media this whole revolt is depicted as Serbian, while Albanians were people who supported the Ottomans. It is then claimed Serbs departed. The texts of these periods easily prove this is nonsense.

Serving in the Ottoman ranks certainly does not make you a loyal servant. They were paid wages and all Balkan people did this to some degree.
They chose side based on their interests when the time came down to it. National unity etc did not exist at the time.

Not much historical evidence that supports our people were constant 'loyal' Ottoman servants while the Serbs were rebellious liberators that were pushed out. In fact, many Serbs settled Kosova during the Ottoman period, 1700's, 1800's etc. Also some Vlachs. I am not sure what the guy is even trying to get at. One can easily read texts from these periods to prove this is nonsense.

In Kosova we did not become the absolute majority until the mid/late 1800's for example when they expelled Albanians from what is today South-Eastern Serbia.
 
I am also not sure what the whole Kosova case has anything to do with some what the guy claims were 'loyal' Pashas in Albania. How does this prove the whole Serbian nationalist narrative which seems to be completely false ?
 
Prizren was mostly Muslim, Vushtrri etc was mostly Muslim. The guy who led the anti-Ottoman resistance was Bogdani, a Catholic, but there were both Muslims and Catholics in the ranks. The 5,000 Arnauts mentioned were mostly Muslim, many if not most of the 20,000 Arnauts mentioned were also Muslim as were many of the 6,000. Arnaut was also a term for a Muslim Albanian.

So much for 'loyal servants' , the guy has swallowed too much Serbian and Western propaganda that seems to confuse religious affiliation with being pro-Ottoman. These texts clearly mention Christian Serbs in the ranks among the Ottoman army, texs also mention Christians on the Ottoman side in the battle of Kosovo 1389 and 1448.

Seems like I am having a debate with a guy who has absolutely no idea about Albanian history. Does not even seem to be aware of the Albanian national awakening or the various revolts against the Ottomans.

Balkan Wars would of never happened had it not been for these revolts first of all. It is pretty much what allowed the Serbs to invade Albanian lands since it pretty much weakened if not practically defeated the Ottoman Empire. Yet claims we would of never had our independence... :LOL:
 
QUOTE:

''
And a further complication is introduced by
the term 'Arnaut', which could be used
as a synonym for Albanian but tended
to suggest those Albanians (in the ethnic-linguistic sense)
who acted as soldiers for the Ottomans-though these it should be noted
included Catholic Albanians as well as Muslim ones.


Piccolomini then moved to Prizren, where he was met by the Catholic
Archbishop Pjeter Bogdani. This was not
their first meeting: soon after the arrival of the Austrians in Kosovo,
Bogdani had gone to see Piccolomini to request that the soldiers
would not molest members of his flock. No doubt
their discussion at that previous meeting had
included suggestion that Bogdani rally the population
of Prizren in support of the Austrians;
and so it was that, in Contarinis words,
Near Prizren, as Piccolomini was approaching
, the inhabitants came out to meet him with festive
shouts: they were 5,000 in number and were led by their Archbishiop,
holding a banner with an image of the Holy Cross.

In 1624, Pjeter Mazrreku reported that Prizren had roughly
200 Catholic inhabitants and 600 Servani. But the great bulk
of the population, 12,000 people in 1624 - were Muslims, almost
all of them Albanians.


No doubt the 5,000 who came out to welcome Piccolomini
did include many of the local Christians, both
Catholic and Orthodox, but they can hardly have accounted
for more than fifth of that crowd..


It is surely significant that one of the earliest printed accounts of
these events, an anonymous text based on original documents, refers to
Piccolomini being greeted at Prizren by '5,000 Arnauts, who were partly Christian
Albanians and partly Muslim Albanians


Mazrreku also noted that the conversion to Islam was quite supperficial;
in 1671 another report on this area stated
that '28 years ago there were many Christians[Catholics] now there remain
300 women and very few men, the rest having abjured their faith
in order to escape impositions and taxes.

''
 
Many Albanians in Kosova were already Muslims actually. Prizren in Kosova was mostly Muslim Albanian, so was Vushtrri etc. Many of these people who revolted were Muslim and they are mentioned as Muslim who had formerly fought in the Ottoman ranks and were paid wages, some are mentioned as faithless, some sources mention them as both Muslim and Christians. There are Serbs mentioned also and they also mention Serbs in the Ottoman ranks.

Though you are right there were also Catholics. But there were also Catholics from Northern Albania that came assist if you read Noel Malcolm's essay on this.

The guy has absolutely no idea what he is talking about. In Serbian and Western media this whole revolt is depicted as Serbian, while Albanians were people who supported the Ottomans. It is then claimed Serbs departed. The texts of these periods easily prove this is nonsense.

Serving in the Ottoman ranks certainly does not make you a loyal servant. They were paid wages and all Balkan people did this to some degree.
They chose side based on their interests when the time came down to it. National unity etc did not exist at the time.

Not much historical evidence that supports our people were constant 'loyal' Ottoman servants while the Serbs were rebellious liberators that were pushed out. In fact, many Serbs settled Kosova during the Ottoman period, 1700's, 1800's etc. Also some Vlachs. I am not sure what the guy is even trying to get at. One can easily read texts from these periods to prove this is nonsense.

In Kosova we did not become the absolute majority until the mid/late 1800's for example when they expelled Albanians from what is today South-Eastern Serbia.

Look at the register of 16th century (1571). Muslims in the rural regions were still rare. This changes however drastically after the Bogdani campaign. But yeah, Vushtrri, Prizren, Peje and Prishtine were the centres that were pred Muslim from the early days. Most of the city dwellers later on also considering themselves to be Turks too.

Sure, this is also the time when animosities rise between Albanians and Serb communities in Kosove - after the Serbian atrocities in South-Eastern Serbia. Prior to that there were conflicts, but mostly local isolated incidents.
 
I am also not sure what the whole Kosova case has anything to do with some what the guy claims were 'loyal' Pashas in Albania. How does this prove the whole Serbian nationalist narrative which seems to be completely false ?

This is not about what Serbian say, it is about the truth. The whole feudal system on Albania was based on timar (land title)!to obtain timar you had to be serve in the ottoman army. So the land of the Kastrioti in Kruja or Tirana after the war was lost was spilt between Hasan Sadik Qerim that served in the Ottoman army. Overall this people were loyal, but if the taxes where to hight they rebelled. This is the situation in Albania in the low lands with few exemptions. If you say that Kosovo is different, I have no reason to doubt you. But do not mix what I am saying with Serbian propaganda.


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You are mixing two different periods with over 200 years in between. For the period we are talking about, Albanians in Kosove were predominantly Catholic. Especially in the rural regions.

The argument i was making was that overall Albanians were considered loyal by the Ottomans. Definitely this is not valid from the beginning when there was a lot of residence but after that Albanians were a very strong pillar for the Ottoman Empire. It’s seem that in Kosovo you do not share the same thoughts.


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regardless of ethnic-linguistic or
religious identity; and if the Ottomans
did seek out particular groups for
specially harsh treatment, they would have
targeted above all the Catholics
(co-religionists of the Austrians),
most of whom were ethnically Albanian.
(The Catholic population of Kosovo, said
to be roughly 1,000 households-well
over 5000 people-by Bogdani in the
early 1680s, was estiimated at 2,800
people in 1693)


But on the other hand there is evidence
of a quite large drop in the population
of the towns, most of which did not
regain their pre-1690 levels until
the nineteenth century; and the towns-of
which this part of the Balkans possesed an unusually
dense network-were overhelmingly
populated by Muslim Albanians.(Jovan Cvijic's claim
about the departure of 35,000 - 40,000 Serb
families from Kosovo were implausible not only on
numerical grounds, but also because he described those families as mostly
urban.) When an observer such as Joseph Muller
considered the small size of the Serb
Orthodox population of Peje in the 1830s-just 130 households,
compared with more than 2,000 Muslim
households-he attributed this sorry state of affairs
to the 'Great Exoduses' of the past; but if he had
been able to consult Bogdani's detailed report
of 1681, he would have found at that time the Serbs had
just 100 households, and the Muslims 1,000

...............................
 
As for the fighting men who
subsequently brought the total
(at least in theory)
to 20,000, some of these may also have
been inhabitants of Prizren (which
in 1670 had a population of roughly 50,000)
but the evidence suggests that others
were drawn from further afield. Contarini's account
refers to Piccolomini, on his sickbed in Prizren,
receiving 'the chiefs of the neighbouring peoples, who came
to pay tribute to the Emperor with oaths of fealty.
If, as seems likely, some of these chiefs
had been summoned by Bogdani, we might expect them
to have included leaders of Catholic clans in
the nearby parts of the Malesi; and, indeed,
an Ottoman document written in February 1690(just three months later)
does refer to a large group of mostly
Catholic clans from that area ( including the warlike Fandi)
who had allied themselves with the Austrians.
But the pledge of the total of 20,000 may well have included other
Albanians from areas close to Prizren
who were no longer Catholic, having
been converted to Islam within the previous two or three generations-for example,
the Shulla or Has region, where as Mazrreku reported in 1634,
there had previously been 50 Catholic parishes
but were now only five. Mazrreku also noted that the
conversion to Islam was quite superficial; in 1671
another report on this area stated that
'28 years ago there were many Christians[sc.Catholics]: now
there remain 300 women and very few men, the rest
having abjured their faith in order to escape impositions and taxes.




The point here is not that such people nursed
a burning desire to restore,
one day, their Catholic identity(this may have been true in some cases,
those of the crypto-Christians, but these
seem to have been few in number); rather, it is that
recent attachment to Islam may not have involved
anything like religious conviction, and that it is therefore wrong to assume that such
people would have felt any special duty to support
the Ottoman state merely because they were Muslims.
What was going on in the mind of any local person when he or she
decided to support the Austrians is difficult to reconstruct,
and impossible to prove; but a modern approach which
converts religious identities automatically into some sort of equivalent
of national identities, and then expects blocks of people
to have behaved along those fixed lines,
is unlikely to give us a true picture of seventeenth-century provincial Balkan realities.
The very small educated elite-the Christian clergy, above all-may have understood what Austria was,
and what coming under its rule might mean; but ordinary
people, including clan elders, probably had only haziest idea.
Their recent experience of Ottoman rule was(contrary to what is implied in Stanford Shaw's account)
extremely negative. Taxes and other exacations had, as always, risen sharply during the anti-Habsburg war;
and, what is more, in 1687-9 the beylerbeyi of Rumeli, Yegen Osman
pasha, had treated the territories under his rule as a personal fiefdom
to be milked of its riches, and had employed armies
of personal retaines to plunder it. That
many local people might have welcomed as an alternative
a largely unknown power-one that promised to respect
their local rights, and one that was being
promoted by a local figure, the Catholic Archbishop,
whose moral authority extended beyond his own flock-should
not greatly surprise us.
However, when we recognize that such attitudes could cut across
religious distinctions, this does not mean that we should fall back
into the categories of most nineteenth- and twentieth-century Serbian
or Albanian historians, with their axiomatic assumptions about a 'national' identity
that always strove to throw off Ottoman rule. That
many Albanians continued to serve in the
Ottoman forces opposing the Austrians should not surprise us, even though we cannot
reconstruct the precise combination of factors (economic interest, personal loyalty, local affiliation,
codes of honour, and so on) that may have been involved.
Similar considerations may apply to the case of the Slav Orthodox villagers of the Lume region
South-west of Prizren, whose villages were burnt down by Holstein
because he regarded them as hostile. One early account
described Mahmut Begolli's army as consisting of 'Rascians' as well as Albanians;
some of these 'Rascians' may also have been Orthodox Slavs.



........................
 
I personally don't see what this thread has anything to do with many Albanians being loyal to the Ottomans (Something many other Balkan people were too, used to even be lots of Greek Muslims, Turkified Muslims, Bulgarian Muslims, Serbian Muslims if you wanna relate religious affiliation to political ones, these nations also had a population exchange with Turkey exporting Muslims and Importing Orthodox) or serving in the Ottoman ranks or how it proves such theories. I am not even sure what you are trying to tell us here nor what it has to do with Kosova.

The claim here is that most Albanians were loyal Ottoman servants while most Serbs were a people that constantly fought to throw off Ottoman rule. These are clearly false narratives. Another claim is that the Serbs, since the beginning of the Ottoman occupation, were genocided and oppressed by Albanians which there is no evidence for. What they have done is that they have taken modern national identities and political conflicts and projected this into these past events.

What has that to do with our independence or many Albanians serving the Ottoman Empire ?


Many Albanian claims are absolutely exaggerated too but the Serbian ones have had the most impact.




Show me evidence of loyal Ottoman Albanian servants being transplanted in Kosova between period of 1448 to 1690, that supposedly genocided and terrorized Serbs ? I would prefer also to see sources from these periods, not nationalist drivel written hundreds of years later.
 
Yeah, he was quite the loyal servant

Çerçiz Topulli (20 September 1880 – 17 July 1915) was an Albanian revolutionary and guerrilla fighter involved in the national movement operating in the mountainous areas of southern Albania.[1] He was the younger brother of Bajo Topulli.[2] He was known for fighting the Ottomans in 1907 and 1908 and then after they left, the Greeks in 1913 and 1914 during the Balkan Wars.

Nice cherry picking.

This idea that Balkan nations have been trying constantly to throw off Ottoman rule is nothing but a nationalist myth. By your logic I guess we were all loyal servants ? No according to your logic it was only Albanians, they all flocked together as loyal servants, you're projecting modern national identities into the past.
 
Here we have another 'loyal Servant'

Idriz Seferi 14 March 1847 – 25 March 1927 was an Albanian leader and guerrilla fighter (rebel). A member of the League of Prizren and League of Peja, he was the right-hand man of Isa Boletini, with whom he organized the 1910 Uprising against the Ottoman Empire in the Kosovo Vilayet. After the suppression of the uprising, Seferi continued warfare, in the 1912 Uprising. In the First Balkan War, Boletini and Seferi rose up against Serbia, with whom they had previously been allies to during the 1910 and 1912 Uprisings, and continued to attack Serbian posts in the subsequent occupation and initial phase of World War I (1913-1915). In the second phase of the war (1916-1918), he led troops against Bulgarian forces.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idriz_Seferi

Why is this forum so incredibly buggy btw ?
 
Some more 'Loyal Servant'

Mic Sokoli (1839 – 20 April 1881) was an Albanian nationalist figure and guerrilla fighter from the Highlands of Gjakova.[1] He was a noted guerrilla leader during the years of the League of Prizren and took part in the fighting in Yakova against Mehmet Ali Pasha. He fought in the Battle of Nokshiq (near Grudë) against the Montenegrins. He is remembered by Albanians for an act of heroism in April 1881, in which he sacrificed himself by pressing his body against the mouth of a Ottoman cannon.[2][3]
 
My whole point is that Kosova had a large Albanian population before 1690, I don't know how this Albanian demographic growth in Kosova occurred but it certainly did not start any kind of ethno-nationalist conflict or some kind of genocide on Serbs.
Nor evidence of some kind of loyal Albanian servants vs the Serbs who constantly fought to throw off Ottoman rule. If that was the case, the Serbs in Kosova would of been pushed out and driven out very early on. In one version their historians claim
Albanians were encouraged to settle in the early Ottoman period and were given special rights by the Ottomans, in another version or combined with this version, weirdly enough, it is claimed Albanians came after 1690 as 'loyal servants' of the Ottomans while the rebellious Serbs were pushed out, which is also the theory many Western Historians promote. They claim there were two exoduses of Serbs, one in 1690 and another in the 1700's. If that was the case, then Kosova would of gained an absolute Albanian majority population very early on since it already had a large Albanian population before these years, combined with more Albanians, it would of gained an absolute Albanian majority early.
 
The claim here is that most Albanians were loyal Ottoman servants while most Serbs were a people that constantly fought to throw off Ottoman rule. These are clearly false narratives.

Show me evidence of loyal Ottoman Albanian servants being transplanted in Kosova between period of 1448 to 1690, that supposedly genocided and terrorized Serbs ? I would prefer also to see sources from these periods, not nationalist drivel written hundreds of years later.

The first part is not wrong. Albanian were loyal ottoman subject. Second part is false, Serbs start to fight for their independence induced by Rusia and Rusia gifted them with independence after beating Ottoman Empire.

Border or Trojet can help you with that they can indicate when Albanian Northern tribes moved in Kosovo plain based on DNA samples gather by the Albanian DNA project. From what I have heard the genetic distance is 500-600 years.





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For example the German letter that I posted regarding Kosova in the 1600's and the Austrian Ottoman Wars,
the part where it mentions the Archbishop of Albania and it mentions Patriarch of Clemente and Prizren being capital of Albania. It might look like it mentions two different people but it is the same person. Some Serbian writers have claimed this was the
Serbian Arsenije who led an anti-Ottoman resistance but it was actually Pjeter Bogdani as shown by Austrian and Ottoman
sources of the 17th century

And this from wiki regarding Bogdani:

After arranging for the publication of the Cuneus Prophetarum, Bogdani returned to the Balkans in March 1686 and spent the next years promoting resistance to the armies of the Ottoman Empire, in particular in Kosovo[a] . He and his vicar Toma Raspasani played a leading role in the pro-Austrian movement in Kosovo during the Great Turkish War.[9] He contributed a force of 6,000 Albanian soldiers to the Austrian army which had arrived in Pristina and accompanied it to capture Prizren. There, however, he and much of his army were met by another equally formidable adversary, the plague. Bogdani returned to Pristina but succumbed to the disease there in 6 December 1689.[10] His nephew, Gjergj Bogdani, reported in 1698 that his uncle's remains were later exhumed by Turkish and Tatar soldiers and fed to the dogs in the middle of the square in Pristina. So ended one of the great figures of early Albanian culture, the writer often referred to as the father of Albanian prose.


He was born in the Has region in Kosova.

It is claimed in Serbian and Western history that it was Arsenije Crnojevic III but there is no mention of him in any of these 17th sources, this stems from a misconception where it mentions 'Patriarch Clemente' , some Serbian writers basically interpreted this as the Patriarch Arsenije , but it's actually Pjeter Bogdani mentioned as the same person 'Archbishop of Albania' and he is mentioned by name by the Germans after having met up with them.
 

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