LivingDNA Living Dna results GREEK (unexpected results)

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North Central Italy-related ancestry

This is a confidence group for North Central Italy ancestry with large spread. It includes North Central Italy, Sardinia, Iran and Aegean populations. As it is the largest possible grouping for North Central Italy and surrounding ancestry, you will likely be assigned this if either your ancestry from this region is both small and uncertain, or your ancestry is large but has multiple distinct sources from the region.
The North-Central Italy cluster expands across Tuscany to the Alpine region. The area has experienced an admixture of people over many thousands of years due to a multitude of factors including close proximity to the rest of Europe across the Alps, the expansion and fall of the Roman Empire and even migrations of European Celtic tribes. Archaeological evidence shows that Neanderthals utilised the caves scattered across northern Italy, such as the Fumane cave in Verona.
Home to the Etruscans, these lands were a stronghold in trade and exchange routes even before the expansion of the Roman Empire. Italy’s proximity to Greece and the rest of Europe made it a hub for the movement of people and objects. The Etruscans created the foundation of what would become the Roman Empire, developing their civilisation and creating tombs, art, architecture, religion and gladiatorial combat. Their religion involved ritual practice and the worship of multiple deities. The Romans would go on to adopt many such practices. Subsequent migrations and invasions most likely influenced the genetic signature today, such as the Germanic Lombard occupation from the 6th Century. Italy was subsequently at the heart of the Renaissance, influencing art and science all over Europe. ​
An island in isolation never fails to present its own unique and exciting genetic and archaeological history, and Sardinia is no exception. The genetic signature covers the island of Sardinia and partly extends into the neighbouring French island of Corsica. The solitude of the island is reflected in the modern genetic signature, which is different from the rest of Europe. Although there is some evidence of human habitation before the New Stone Age, it is thought that the most significant migration into Sardinia came from Neolithic farmers that were moving across Southern Europe from around 6000 BC. Recent studies have estimated that up to 80% of the Sardinian ancestry today can be traced back to these first farming colonists, and it has been found that Sardinians have the most Neolithic farmer DNA of any other population in Europe. The oldest mummified man in Europe was found in the Italian Alps, but DNA testing has shown him to be most genetically similar to the modern Sardinian population.
Many people living in Sardinia have traces of Italian DNA. This may be in part due to the migration and colonisation of the Romans in 238 BC, when Sardinia became a very Latinised island. There is an exception with the tribes of Barbagia who adamantly refused the Roman occupation, with their resistance being aided by the mountainous region they inhabited. The languages spoken today act as a living legacy to the Roman occupation across Sardinia, having retained many latin elements.
This genetic mixture appears to roughly cover the area of present day Greece and the Aegean Islands. Greece is often referred to as the cradle of Western civilisation, paving the way for great developments in medicine, architecture, politics and more. As the founders of democracy, the ancient Greeks changed the lives of future peoples across the globe. This was the first place in Europe to be introduced to farming (most likely from Anatolia), and the genetics of the area act as a living legacy to this. Farming appeared by 7000 BC, and studies have suggested that around 60% of DNA in the Aegean area today may be derived from these Neolithic inhabitants from the Near East, who intermixed with the existing hunter gatherer populations.
This genetic signature was influenced by early events, such as the absorption of the Minoans in Crete by the Mycenaeans from the mainland in c.1500 BC. From Pythagoras to Plato, the ancient Greeks have a rich history of leaders, battles, science and philosophy. Alexander the Great ruled the Aegean and spread Greek culture and genetics across Western Asian. The Aegean sea was a key route for trade and development until Greece was conquered by the Romans after the Battle of Corinth in 146 BC. From the Persians to the Ottomans, outside cultural and genetic influences at varying degrees occurred throughout the history of the Aegean.
The Iranian genetic cluster covers modern day Iran and Turkmenistan, a region with a fascinating ancient heritage harkening back across millennia. Homeland of the many incarnations of the Persian Empire from the Achaemenids to the Safavids, the beating heart of the Silk Road has also seen Greeks, Arabs, Mongols, Turks, and Indians invade, settle, and intermingle with its Iranian inhabitants. The Fertile Crescent at the westernmost part of Iran was one of the few places where agriculture was invented, setting in motion the transition from hunter gatherer societies to settled villages, cities and states across Central and West Eurasia.
The major event responsible for shaping the genetic landscape of the Iranian plateau occurred approximately 2500-3000 years ago, when the Indo-Iranian peoples migrated south and east from the steppes. These were an offshoot of the same people who migrated across much of Europe at a similar time, and explains why nearly all languages spoken from Ireland to India (including Iran) are part of the same family. Until the Turkic and Mongol expansions, much of Central Asia was dominated by Iranian nomads, whilst their settled cousins further south went on to found dynasties and cities that are still famous to this day. Their empires have left traces of the Iranian genetic signature in areas as far as Turkey in the west and India in the east.
 
I agree Ygorcs. Living DNA gave me the phylogenetic tree but i don't know if there are any informations about subclade H-M2972. I will try in the recent future the ftdna test.
 
Hello my friend! Volos Pelion!!

Ι can not help you there.
It is not consider an area with huge mixing,
and is pecculiar cause Roma people do not prefer high levels above sea,
neither the sea,
surely it is very very old, but I can not figure when entered area
but from the results, it must be very back in time,
and I suggest check how deep the analysis is
and how much some DYS fit.
 
Ι can not help you there.
It is not consider an area with huge mixing,
and is pecculiar cause Roma people do not prefer high levels above sea,
neither the sea,
surely it is very very old, but I can not figure when entered area
but from the results, it must be very back in time,
and I suggest check how deep the analysis is
and how much some DYS fit.

If it is old, it could only have arrived with the Persians, or via migration from Asia to Macedonia during Alexanders rule. If it is more recent but not Roma, it could have even been picked up by Huns or Avars. Avars invaded Greece. My own line most probably arrived with the Avaro-Slavic tribe Baiounitai or the Goths. Then got assimilated into Byzantium and then Albania somewhere along the line. All it takes is a few generations(100 years or so) to replace autosomes from intermixing.
 
If it is old, it could only have arrived with the Persians, or via migration from Asia to Macedonia during Alexanders rule. If it is more recent but not Roma, it could have even been picked up by Huns or Avars. Avars invaded Greece. My own line most probably arrived with the Avaro-Slavic tribe Baiounitai or the Goths. Then got assimilated into Byzantium and then Albania somewhere along the line. All it takes is a few generations(100 years or so) to replace autosomes from intermixing.


indeed
if he wants that info he must search more
and compare with other M-82

Even Turkic populations have some of the Haplo.
 
Yetos, what do you mean how much DYS fit? Pelion never had Roma people and Greeks never had good relationships with them. it is another one reason why I believe the Haplogroup goes very back in time.
 
It shows how ethnic groups are related. It’s the map of north and central Italy including Iran for some reason.
 
I've never heard such nonsense.
 
I only say that at the Living Dna cautious mode, the North-Central Italy related ancestry includes Iran. I don’t know why. Chill out.
 
This is the description.

North Central Italy-related ancestry

This is a confidence group for North Central Italy ancestry with large spread. It includes North Central Italy, Sardinia, Iran and Aegean populations. As it is the largest possible grouping for North Central Italy and surrounding ancestry, you will likely be assigned this if either your ancestry from this region is both small and uncertain, or your ancestry is large but has multiple distinct sources from the region.
The North-Central Italy cluster expands across Tuscany to the Alpine region. The area has experienced an admixture of people over many thousands of years due to a multitude of factors including close proximity to the rest of Europe across the Alps, the expansion and fall of the Roman Empire and even migrations of European Celtic tribes. Archaeological evidence shows that Neanderthals utilised the caves scattered across northern Italy, such as the Fumane cave in Verona.
Home to the Etruscans, these lands were a stronghold in trade and exchange routes even before the expansion of the Roman Empire. Italy’s proximity to Greece and the rest of Europe made it a hub for the movement of people and objects. The Etruscans created the foundation of what would become the Roman Empire, developing their civilisation and creating tombs, art, architecture, religion and gladiatorial combat. Their religion involved ritual practice and the worship of multiple deities. The Romans would go on to adopt many such practices. Subsequent migrations and invasions most likely influenced the genetic signature today, such as the Germanic Lombard occupation from the 6th Century. Italy was subsequently at the heart of the Renaissance, influencing art and science all over Europe. ​
An island in isolation never fails to present its own unique and exciting genetic and archaeological history, and Sardinia is no exception. The genetic signature covers the island of Sardinia and partly extends into the neighbouring French island of Corsica. The solitude of the island is reflected in the modern genetic signature, which is different from the rest of Europe. Although there is some evidence of human habitation before the New Stone Age, it is thought that the most significant migration into Sardinia came from Neolithic farmers that were moving across Southern Europe from around 6000 BC. Recent studies have estimated that up to 80% of the Sardinian ancestry today can be traced back to these first farming colonists, and it has been found that Sardinians have the most Neolithic farmer DNA of any other population in Europe. The oldest mummified man in Europe was found in the Italian Alps, but DNA testing has shown him to be most genetically similar to the modern Sardinian population.
Many people living in Sardinia have traces of Italian DNA. This may be in part due to the migration and colonisation of the Romans in 238 BC, when Sardinia became a very Latinised island. There is an exception with the tribes of Barbagia who adamantly refused the Roman occupation, with their resistance being aided by the mountainous region they inhabited. The languages spoken today act as a living legacy to the Roman occupation across Sardinia, having retained many latin elements.
This genetic mixture appears to roughly cover the area of present day Greece and the Aegean Islands. Greece is often referred to as the cradle of Western civilisation, paving the way for great developments in medicine, architecture, politics and more. As the founders of democracy, the ancient Greeks changed the lives of future peoples across the globe. This was the first place in Europe to be introduced to farming (most likely from Anatolia), and the genetics of the area act as a living legacy to this. Farming appeared by 7000 BC, and studies have suggested that around 60% of DNA in the Aegean area today may be derived from these Neolithic inhabitants from the Near East, who intermixed with the existing hunter gatherer populations.
This genetic signature was influenced by early events, such as the absorption of the Minoans in Crete by the Mycenaeans from the mainland in c.1500 BC. From Pythagoras to Plato, the ancient Greeks have a rich history of leaders, battles, science and philosophy. Alexander the Great ruled the Aegean and spread Greek culture and genetics across Western Asian. The Aegean sea was a key route for trade and development until Greece was conquered by the Romans after the Battle of Corinth in 146 BC. From the Persians to the Ottomans, outside cultural and genetic influences at varying degrees occurred throughout the history of the Aegean.
The Iranian genetic cluster covers modern day Iran and Turkmenistan, a region with a fascinating ancient heritage harkening back across millennia. Homeland of the many incarnations of the Persian Empire from the Achaemenids to the Safavids, the beating heart of the Silk Road has also seen Greeks, Arabs, Mongols, Turks, and Indians invade, settle, and intermingle with its Iranian inhabitants. The Fertile Crescent at the westernmost part of Iran was one of the few places where agriculture was invented, setting in motion the transition from hunter gatherer societies to settled villages, cities and states across Central and West Eurasia.
The major event responsible for shaping the genetic landscape of the Iranian plateau occurred approximately 2500-3000 years ago, when the Indo-Iranian peoples migrated south and east from the steppes. These were an offshoot of the same people who migrated across much of Europe at a similar time, and explains why nearly all languages spoken from Ireland to India (including Iran) are part of the same family. Until the Turkic and Mongol expansions, much of Central Asia was dominated by Iranian nomads, whilst their settled cousins further south went on to found dynasties and cities that are still famous to this day. Their empires have left traces of the Iranian genetic signature in areas as far as Turkey in the west and India in the east.



 
Tomorrow I will try to upload the Living dna map.
 
This is the map.

the text is extremely unclear, and it does not seem all part of the same paragrap. In any case here it is saying that Iran=Indo-Iranian=Steppe ancestry=Indo-Europeans.

The major event responsible for shaping the genetic landscape of the Iranian plateau occurred approximately 2500-3000 years ago, when the Indo-Iranian peoples migrated south and east from the steppes. These were an offshoot of the same people who migrated across much of Europe at a similar time, and explains why nearly all languages spoken from Ireland to India (including Iran) are part of the same family.
 
This is the exact text. And before you said If I really mean that. I believe you can undestand that it’s what they write and not what I mean.
 
This is the description.

North Central Italy-related ancestry

This is a confidence group for North Central Italy ancestry with large spread. It includes North Central Italy, Sardinia, Iran and Aegean populations. As it is the largest possible grouping for North Central Italy and surrounding ancestry, you will likely be assigned this if either your ancestry from this region is both small and uncertain, or your ancestry is large but has multiple distinct sources from the region.
The North-Central Italy cluster expands across Tuscany to the Alpine region. The area has experienced an admixture of people over many thousands of years due to a multitude of factors including close proximity to the rest of Europe across the Alps, the expansion and fall of the Roman Empire and even migrations of European Celtic tribes. Archaeological evidence shows that Neanderthals utilised the caves scattered across northern Italy, such as the Fumane cave in Verona.
Home to the Etruscans, these lands were a stronghold in trade and exchange routes even before the expansion of the Roman Empire. Italy’s proximity to Greece and the rest of Europe made it a hub for the movement of people and objects. The Etruscans created the foundation of what would become the Roman Empire, developing their civilisation and creating tombs, art, architecture, religion and gladiatorial combat. Their religion involved ritual practice and the worship of multiple deities. The Romans would go on to adopt many such practices. Subsequent migrations and invasions most likely influenced the genetic signature today, such as the Germanic Lombard occupation from the 6th Century. Italy was subsequently at the heart of the Renaissance, influencing art and science all over Europe. ​
An island in isolation never fails to present its own unique and exciting genetic and archaeological history, and Sardinia is no exception. The genetic signature covers the island of Sardinia and partly extends into the neighbouring French island of Corsica. The solitude of the island is reflected in the modern genetic signature, which is different from the rest of Europe. Although there is some evidence of human habitation before the New Stone Age, it is thought that the most significant migration into Sardinia came from Neolithic farmers that were moving across Southern Europe from around 6000 BC. Recent studies have estimated that up to 80% of the Sardinian ancestry today can be traced back to these first farming colonists, and it has been found that Sardinians have the most Neolithic farmer DNA of any other population in Europe. The oldest mummified man in Europe was found in the Italian Alps, but DNA testing has shown him to be most genetically similar to the modern Sardinian population.
Many people living in Sardinia have traces of Italian DNA. This may be in part due to the migration and colonisation of the Romans in 238 BC, when Sardinia became a very Latinised island. There is an exception with the tribes of Barbagia who adamantly refused the Roman occupation, with their resistance being aided by the mountainous region they inhabited. The languages spoken today act as a living legacy to the Roman occupation across Sardinia, having retained many latin elements.
This genetic mixture appears to roughly cover the area of present day Greece and the Aegean Islands. Greece is often referred to as the cradle of Western civilisation, paving the way for great developments in medicine, architecture, politics and more. As the founders of democracy, the ancient Greeks changed the lives of future peoples across the globe. This was the first place in Europe to be introduced to farming (most likely from Anatolia), and the genetics of the area act as a living legacy to this. Farming appeared by 7000 BC, and studies have suggested that around 60% of DNA in the Aegean area today may be derived from these Neolithic inhabitants from the Near East, who intermixed with the existing hunter gatherer populations.
This genetic signature was influenced by early events, such as the absorption of the Minoans in Crete by the Mycenaeans from the mainland in c.1500 BC. From Pythagoras to Plato, the ancient Greeks have a rich history of leaders, battles, science and philosophy. Alexander the Great ruled the Aegean and spread Greek culture and genetics across Western Asian. The Aegean sea was a key route for trade and development until Greece was conquered by the Romans after the Battle of Corinth in 146 BC. From the Persians to the Ottomans, outside cultural and genetic influences at varying degrees occurred throughout the history of the Aegean.
The Iranian genetic cluster covers modern day Iran and Turkmenistan, a region with a fascinating ancient heritage harkening back across millennia. Homeland of the many incarnations of the Persian Empire from the Achaemenids to the Safavids, the beating heart of the Silk Road has also seen Greeks, Arabs, Mongols, Turks, and Indians invade, settle, and intermingle with its Iranian inhabitants. The Fertile Crescent at the westernmost part of Iran was one of the few places where agriculture was invented, setting in motion the transition from hunter gatherer societies to settled villages, cities and states across Central and West Eurasia.
The major event responsible for shaping the genetic landscape of the Iranian plateau occurred approximately 2500-3000 years ago, when the Indo-Iranian peoples migrated south and east from the steppes. These were an offshoot of the same people who migrated across much of Europe at a similar time, and explains why nearly all languages spoken from Ireland to India (including Iran) are part of the same family. Until the Turkic and Mongol expansions, much of Central Asia was dominated by Iranian nomads, whilst their settled cousins further south went on to found dynasties and cities that are still famous to this day. Their empires have left traces of the Iranian genetic signature in areas as far as Turkey in the west and India in the east.




PRAETOR, why did you leave the descriptions for other groups such as Iranian and Sardinian under the North Italian related heading?
 
Davef, this is the exact Description I didn’t leave anything. Tomorrow I will send the printscreens of the text and the map.
 
You don't have to go thru all that work to post a pic, a link would be just fine. Better still, post a link and the pic, it'll help boatloads.
 
OK, I've had enough for one day. The thread is closed.
 
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