Mt Etna Eruption

Palermo Trapani

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Hello everyone. I am not one for starting threads but Mt Etna is currently erupting. Both beautiful and scary at the same time. Check out the Live Stream on Youtube Local Team which is live as of 16 February entitled Eruzione Etna, emissione di cenere: diretta video
 
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Question for Mods. I had the live stream from Sicily in the first post. Is that allowed? I had the link posted in my first post but I removed it, if you follow the information I have in the first post, you can find the live stream. Spectacular views
 
There have been a number of earthquakes that have been felt strongly lately in Albania, Turkey, Croatia, Greece and Italy. Now the earth is probably releasing energy through Etna.

You could be correct.
 
It is the most active volcano in Europe, with frequent eruptions known for at least 2,700 years. Volcanoes cannot be underestimated, as their eruptions can be catastrophic when occours, for example, the devastating pyroclastic flows. It is a spectacle of nature, beautiful to be seen (very far way from us, of course). When I was in Naples I was completely mesmerized by Mount Vesuvius and I couldn't take my eye off the mountain by all the way from Naples to Pompeii. I spent a whole day in Pompeii, a relic preserved by the ashes of Vesuvius. Volcanoes are magical and scary.
 
It is the most active volcano in Europe, with frequent eruptions known for at least 2,700 years. Volcanoes cannot be underestimated, as their eruptions can be catastrophic when occours, for example, the devastating pyroclastic flows. It is a spectacle of nature, beautiful to be seen (very far way from us, of course). When I was in Naples I was completely mesmerized by Mount Vesuvius and I couldn't take my eye off the mountain by all the way from Naples to Pompeii. I spent a whole day in Pompeii, a relic preserved by the ashes of Vesuvius. Volcanoes are magical and scary.

Duarte: Very good post, very thoughtful and intelligently written (which is always the case)(y)
 
... Spectacular !!!
 
... Spectacular !!!

Salento: It really is something to see. As Duarte alluded to, it kind of gives you a hint, or maybe allows you to visualize, what happened at Vesuvius in 79 AD.
 
Awe inspiring, indeed, but I don't know if I'd like living in the shadow of Aetna, and think of what it's spewing into the atmosphere.

I wouldn't like living around Napoli either. Not for Vesuvius so much, because it's been pretty quiet, but for the Campi Flegrei. I wouldn't live anywhere near the western part of the city. There are lots of earthquakes there and eruptions as well. It would be as if a huge city of four million was built right in the most active center of Yellowstone National Park for those who have been there.

See:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phlegraean_Fields

"The Phlegraean Fields (Italian: Campi Flegrei [ˈkampi fleˈɡrɛi]; Neapolitan: Campe Flegree, from Greek φλέγω phlego, "to burn")[2][citation needed] is a large volcano situated to the west of Naples, Italy. It was declared a regional park in 2003. The area of the caldera consists of 24 craters and volcanic edifices; most of them lie under water. Hydrothermal activity can be observed at Lucrino, Agnano and the town of Pozzuoli. There are also effusive gaseous manifestations in the Solfatara crater, the mythological home of the Roman god of fire, Vulcan. This area is monitored by the Vesuvius Observatory.[3]"At present, the Phlegraean Fields area comprises the Naples districts of Agnano and Fuorigrotta, the area of Pozzuoli, Bacoli, Monte di Procida, Quarto, the Phlegrean Islands (Ischia, Procida and Vivara).[citation needed]

A 2009 journal article stated that inflation of the caldera centre near Pozzuoli might presage an eruptive event within decades.[10]

The caldera, which now is essentially at ground level, is accessible on foot. It contains many fumaroles, from which steam can be seen issuing, and over 150 pools (at the last count) of boiling mud. Several subsidiary cones and tuff craters lie within the caldera. One of these craters is filled by Lake Avernus.


It's something to see I can tell you, and terrifying. I don't know why more people don't visit them. Climbing to the top of Vesuvius, as my then 12 year old son insisted we do was nothing in comparison. If it ever really erupts at it's full potential it would be an apocalyptic event world wide, as is the case for Yellowstone.
 

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