Regarding Great Flood Myths

Archetype0ne

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Having recently heard one of the more well researched/made voice documentaries on the Sumerians (akin to a short Audiobook pre sleep, would recommend, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2lJUOv0hLA&t=4043s).

Highly recommend this episode/series as a whole.

At some point towards the early parts of the audiobook the narrator based on various reading makes the hypothesis that the first great city states and human social organisation, could have risen as an aftermath of the migration from other smaller communities being forced to relocate from what is now the Persian Gulf, uphill onto solid ground sometime after the last glacial maximum (20k-8kp), due to the rise of the sea level / yearly precipitation as a result of the iceshelfs worldwide melting. The narrator postulates, that such an event could have given rise to the various flood myths among early communities, which later would be put into the canon of various religions. At the time, from what I understand from other sources, between HG communities and early cereal dependent communities (maybe even pre proper farming) the storm/sky Gods that would cause rain and precipitation had among the highest rank in the pantheon of Gods precisely cause after rivers(possibly great snakes in early myths) would flood they would deposit sediment making the harshest land, fertile, not only increasing the amount of vegetation and cereal, but also the number of game to be hunted. Yet, that same rain and precipitation that provides life, from the highest God of ancient peoples, could be seen as a punisher, once it submerges their cities and forces whomever survives to flee and found new communities.

Now as drought is happening in certain locations in the world I keep coming across articles as such:
220617145013-01-ancient-iraq-city-unearthed-drought-exlarge-169.jpg

https://edition.cnn.com/2022/06/20/world/iraq-city-unearthed-drought-scn/index.html

A sprawling 3,400-year-old city emerged in Iraq after a reservoir's water level swiftly dropped due to extreme drought.Kurdish and German archaeologists excavated the settlement in the Mosul reservoir, along the Tigris River in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq, in January and February. The project was in partnership with the Directorate of Antiquities and Heritage in Duhok to preserve the area's cultural heritage for future generations.
The archaeological site, Kemune, is believed to be the Bronze Age city Zakhiku, a major hub of the Mittani Empire that reigned from 1550 to 1350 BC. The kingdom's territory stretched from the Mediterranean Sea to northern Iraq, according to Ivana Puljiz, junior professor in the department of near eastern archaeology and assyriology at the University of Freiburg in Breisgau, Germany, and one of the directors of the project.


This particular site is too young to be that relevant to the beforementioned hypothesis, but one can logically speculate that the deeper one goes into the sea, the older sites can be found.

So, to cut it short, as this can go on for a while. What do you guys think, is there merit to a post Glacial Maximum rise in sea levels, having contributed to the myriad of flood myths? Do you think if by chance, more submerged ancient cities are found we could ever get proof for it?

Edit: An Illustration of what I am referring to:
Map-illustrating-the-emergent-parts-of-the-continental-shelves-worldwide-during-the-last.png

[h=1]Map illustrating the emergent parts of the continental shelves worldwide during the last glacial maximum. The figure assumes a glacial eustatic lowstand of 120m below present sea level (Fairbanks, 1989) and does not take into account glacially induced flexural uplift in high-latitude regions adjacent to large ice sheets or neotectonic (Holocene) uplift or subsidence. (ETOPO2 v.2 bathymetric dataset provided, courtesy of NOAA [National Geophysical Data Centre].) [/h]
https://www.researchgate.net/figure...lves-worldwide-during-the-last_fig5_255542619
 
It's certainly possible, although I'm not an expert in this field of science, so that's a layman's response.

I've also heard the flood myths could be a distant memory of the flooding of the Black Sea.

What I did learn in long ago Biblical Archaeology classes in my Catholic prep school is that the Noah story in the Bible is probably a repurposing for religious reasons of the Epic of Gilgamesh. I remember being bored to death reading it. Education is sometimes wasted on the young. :)

I'll give the video a watch. Thanks.
 
Settling the interior after a memory of just being a flooded talassocratic society...
 

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