Remains of Anglo-Saxon cemetery discovered

Jovialis

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Archaeologists from the University of Sheffield have uncovered a previously unknown Anglo-Saxon cemetery.

Excavations have revealed more than 20 burials at the extraordinary cemetery in the Lincolnshire Wolds dating back to the late fifth to mid sixth centuries AD.

The dig at the site in Scremby, Lincolnshire was led by Dr. Hugh Willmott and Dr. Katie Hemer from the University of Sheffield's Department of Archaeology in collaboration with Dr. Adam Daubney, the Lincolnshire Finds Liaison Officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

The cemetery was first brought to light when a local metal dectorist began to discover a number of Anglo-Saxon artefacts, including copper gilded brooches, iron shield bosses and spear heads.

The finds were typical of those found in early Anglo-Saxon burials therefore it was necessary to excavate the site to ensure any further artefacts were retrieved, recorded and preserved before they could be destroyed by agricultural activity.

International volunteers, students from the University of Sheffield, and members of the RAF from nearby stations took part in the excavation which is the first to have been extensively investigated since the 19th century.

Dr. Hugh Willmott, Senior Lecturer in European Historical Archaeology from the University of Sheffield, said: "Almost without exception, the burials were accompanied by a rich array of objects, in keeping with the funerary rites adopted during the early centuries of the Germanic migrations to eastern England.

"What is particularly interesting is the significant proportion of very lavish burials which belonged to women. These women wore necklaces made from sometimes hundreds of amber, glass and rock crystal beads, used personal items such as tweezers, carried fabric bags held open by elephant ivory rings, and wore exquisitely decorated brooches to fasten their clothing.
"Two women even received silver finger rings and a style of silver buckle commonly associated with Jutish communities in Kent. Furnished burials belonging to males were also identified, including a number buried with weaponry such as spears and shields.

Dr. Willmott added: "Children were notably absent in the parts of the cemetery excavated this year, however, one of the most striking burials was that of a richly-dressed woman who was buried with a baby cradled in her left arm.

"The preservation of the skeletal remains, as well as the many grave finds, provide an exciting opportunity to explore the social and cultural dynamics of the community who chose to bury their dead on this chalky outcrop."

In order to understand as much as possible about the site and those buried there, a series of scientific investigations are underway at the University of Sheffield by the Department of Archaeology.

The human remains are undergoing a complete osteological assessment, whilst stable isotope analysis of teeth and bone will identify where the individuals grew up as children and what food resources they ate.

Dr. Katie Hemer, Lecturer in Bioarchaeology at the University of Sheffield, said: "Analysis also extends to a number of the finds, including the amber beads, which are being provenanced in collaboration with colleagues from Sheffield's Department of Physics; we will analyse the elemental composition of the metalwork and identify the elephant species which produced the ivory rings.

"The project's multi-faceted investigation which incorporates cutting-edge scientific techniques will enable Sheffield archaeologists to ask and answer significant questions about early Anglo-Saxon communities in eastern England."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-11-anglo-saxon-cemetery.html#jCp
 
Hopefully they will test deeper subclades than just I-M253 or R-U106. It would be nice to start correlating subclades from 3,000-1,000 ybp with actual ancient dna samples.
 
Hopefully they will test deeper subclades than just I-M253 or R-U106. It would be nice to start correlating subclades from 3,000-1,000 ybp with actual ancient dna samples.

So far there is no mention of aDNA testing with this Anglo-Saxon cemetery, which is unfortunate.
 
Saw a program about it last night, One female was tested by Isotope, and found to of spent her early childhood in the South of England. I think they mentioned further testing, so it will be interesting,to find out if she was a native Britain, or other.

The the grave goods are typical Anglian rather than Saxon, but there were Jutish settlements documented in the South of England, so it could mean a cultural mixing of both similar peoples.

Regarding the Burials, its assumed the burials may be first or second generation continental incomers, and among the finds was an Elephant Tusk Band that held a Pouch Bag. A very similar Burial ground where I live in the North East of England also produced very similar grave goods including a very similar Elephant Tusk, support ring from a similar Pouch/Bag, this indicates a very close cultural connection, some distance apart.

Recent metal detecting finds,such as in this case, are are locating a lot more of these early 'Anglian Cultural' burial grounds, and this indicate's a more significant, and larger population/cultural impact from these early incommers,during the periods of post Roman Britain,especially in the North, and Eastern areas of England, during the 5th, 6th, and 7th centuries.

I think their origins will soon be traced via DNA studies, and I will certianly look forward to the results.
 
Saw a program about it last night, One female was tested by Isotope, and found to of spent her early childhood in the South of England. I think they mentioned further testing, so it will be interesting,to find out if she was a native Britain, or other.

The the grave goods are typical Anglian rather than Saxon, but there were Jutish settlements documented in the South of England, so it could mean a cultural mixing of both similar peoples.

Regarding the Burials, its assumed the burials may be first or second generation continental incomers, and among the finds was an Elephant Tusk Band that held a Pouch Bag. A very similar Burial ground where I live in the North East of England also produced very similar grave goods including a very similar Elephant Tusk, support ring from a similar Pouch/Bag, this indicates a very close cultural connection, some distance apart.

Recent metal detecting finds,such as in this case, are are locating a lot more of these early 'Anglian Cultural' burial grounds, and this indicate's a more significant, and larger population/cultural impact from these early incommers,during the periods of post Roman Britain,especially in the North, and Eastern areas of England, during the 5th, 6th, and 7th centuries.

I think their origins will soon be traced via DNA studies, and I will certianly look forward to the results.

Very interesting, Paul. I'm right in the middle of finishing up Season 3 of "The Last Kingdom", so it has a bit more resonance for me now. :)
 
Hi Angela
We are also waiting for the next series. The real Uchtred and his family legends are well known around here,in Northern England mainly due to the long running family Blood Feud.

Uchtreds daughter Ealdgyth married Maldred ( his direct descendant ) and their family later became the FitzMaldreds, who are the believed Ancestor's of the famous Neville Family of Northern England. Isabella Neville married Robert FitzMaldred, and their son George took the Neville family name, and they became ancestors of the Royal Family, ( most notebly, Cecilly Neville the mother of King Richard III,) so his DNA is still around, one day they may even be able to identify it.
 
Hi Angela
We are also waiting for the next series. The real Uchtred and his family legends are well known around here,in Northern England mainly due to the long running family Blood Feud.

Uchtreds daughter Ealdgyth married Maldred ( his direct descendant ) and their family later became the FitzMaldreds, who are the believed Ancestor's of the famous Neville Family of Northern England. Isabella Neville married Robert FitzMaldred, and their son George took the Neville family name, and they became ancestors of the Royal Family, ( most notebly, Cecilly Neville the mother of King Richard III,) so his DNA is still around, one day they may even be able to identify it.
That's typical Fitz is Norman and most of the Saxon migration was in South anyway. Interesting you're H1 Maternal a lot of Iberians are H1 actually
 
Hi Angela
We are also waiting for the next series. The real Uchtred and his family legends are well known around here,in Northern England mainly due to the long running family Blood Feud.

Uchtreds daughter Ealdgyth married Maldred ( his direct descendant ) and their family later became the FitzMaldreds, who are the believed Ancestor's of the famous Neville Family of Northern England. Isabella Neville married Robert FitzMaldred, and their son George took the Neville family name, and they became ancestors of the Royal Family, ( most notebly, Cecilly Neville the mother of King Richard III,) so his DNA is still around, one day they may even be able to identify it.
Have you ever done a autosomal test did you do one with Britain's dna?
 
Hi Lenab,
Yes Ive had two full Autosomal DNA tests.

The first one I did was with LivingDNA, and then one with 23 & Me. Think I put the results on this site, The LivingDNA Autosomal most accurate is the cautious mode on living DNA, and they had me 100% Europe, 100% Great Britain and Ireland, with 54.3% Northumbrian Ancestry, then 29.3% South East England, 4.4% Orkney, 3.2% Cornwall, and Great Britain and Ireland unassigned at 8.3%.

23 & Me Autosomal results were a bit different in 'European' 100%, 'British & Irish', 80.7%, 'Broadly North West European' 14.4%, their continental had me as 'French & German', at 2% but earlier placed this as 'Netherlands' 2% in that group, the rest, 'Broadly South European' 1%, and Broadly European 0.05%.

They also indicated 'recent 100% Ancestor from' as 100% from 'British and Irish' from 1930 -1840, then 100% from 'Netherlands Ancestry' between to 1840,-1750, then 100% from 'Scandinavian Ancestry' between 1810-1720, then 100% from 'Finnish Ancestry' within 1780-1690, and finally 100% from 'Iberian ancestry' between 1780-1690.

I Have not done any Test with Britains DNA or any other yet, and Im told anything under 2% is just noise.
 
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Hi Angela
We are also waiting for the next series. The real Uchtred and his family legends are well known around here,in Northern England mainly due to the long running family Blood Feud.

Uchtreds daughter Ealdgyth married Maldred ( his direct descendant ) and their family later became the FitzMaldreds, who are the believed Ancestor's of the famous Neville Family of Northern England. Isabella Neville married Robert FitzMaldred, and their son George took the Neville family name, and they became ancestors of the Royal Family, ( most notebly, Cecilly Neville the mother of King Richard III,) so his DNA is still around, one day they may even be able to identify it.

Can't wait for Season 4. It's the best thing on netflix now, imo. I particularly like David Dawson's portrayal of King Alfred; it's really superb, although I think he may have overdone the illness a bit for the early Alfred. I just watched episode nine last night and cried all the way through it.

Off topic, I know, but I wonder what you thought of the casting of the "Saxons" in terms of appearance? I would have expected them to look more like the Danes, both being Germanic people, and yet that's not how the Saxons were cast. In my mind, other than some of the women and a few of the men like the Lord of Mercia, they appear darker, perhaps more like the original "Britons"? Am I wrong?

Perhaps it was done for ease of identification, the way the Danes always had round shields and the Saxons rectangular shields?
 
Hi Angela,
Its like a film/hollywood thing, There's quite a lot wrong about it, even Uchtreds sword is over the top, etc but regarding the Anglo Saxons Its the same with The Viking series they also made the Anglo-Saxons look very different than they would of been.

The Last Kingdom was filmed in Hungary, and many of the extra's may be a reflection of the local population, Regarding the viking series, I think it was mostly filmed in Ireland, and maybe theres a very slight Celtic Anti-English/British sentiment thats sneaked or crept in, regarding portraying any Anglo-Saxons...lol

The Anglo-Saxons, and most Vikings would of looked very similar to each other, much like many British or Scandinavians Persons would of today if you takeaway the last 100 years of recent migrations and assimilations to both area's, you are still looking at the same peoples.

Regarding the props Shields dress etc it may be down to costs, and economics etc, but it is a shame they never really reflected the Anglo-Saxons as they correctly would of been, the Anglo-Saxon helmets were probably based on a single Anglo-Saxon image,turning a blind eye to the vast majority of contemporary conical images, its called Historical Blindness. The shield differences may of been to show the different parties.

In any event I will still be looking forward to watching both new series, and hopefully soon.
 
That's typical Fitz is Norman and most of the Saxon migration was in South anyway. Interesting you're H1 Maternal a lot of Iberians are H1 actually

Hi Lenab
my MtDNA is H1c3, but my Y DNA is very problematic all over, its Y H2a1, and very rare in Europe, theres nothing around explaining this subclade, The Haplogroup H2 has changed a few times prior to 2015. Y DNA H2a1 with P-96, is supposedly an introduction to Europe through Early farmers, all the way from India, but then again its also supposedly came from one of the oldest original first Europeans. It was believed to of been extinct in Europe.

There are only three of us in the UK, one in Eastern Scotland, myself in Northern England, and recently another in the Cornwall area of South West England, all reported as Y H2, The Scottish and myself are both Y,H2a1, due to having the positive snp M9313.

Im at a loss, trying to figure it out, either we've been in Europe from the beginning, or came with the Roman Army, or traders, etc but I have traced all of my family and they are nothing but British, several lineages proved and reaching back to the early 9th century to the Saxon settlements of Wessex.
 
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Hi Lenab,
Yes Ive had two full Autosomal DNA tests.

The first one I did was with LivingDNA, and then one with 23 & Me. Think I put the results on this site, The LivingDNA Autosomal most accurate is the cautious mode on living DNA, and they had me 100% Europe, 100% Great Britain and Ireland, with 54.3% Northumbrian Ancestry, then 29.3% South East England, 4.4% Orkney, 3.2% Cornwall, and Great Britain and Ireland unassigned at 8.3%.

23 & Me Autosomal results were a bit different in 'European' 100%, 'British & Irish', 80.7%, 'Broadly North West European' 14.4%, their continental had me as 'French & German', at 2% but earlier placed this as 'Netherlands' 2% in that group, the rest, 'Broadly South European' 1%, and Broadly European 0.05%. They also indicated on top of British,100% Netherlands Ancestry possibly between to 1840,-1750 100% Scandinavian Ancestry between 1810-1720, 100% Finnish Ancestry within 1780-1690, and 100% Iberian between the same.

I Have not done any Test with Britains DNA or any other yet, and Im told anything under 2% is just noise.
Britain's dna is a haplogroup test it's not available anymore sadly it was very professional and read a person's haplogroups for thousands of years luckily I did screen shots of all my test results from that as well as autosomal I can post you my Father's line haplogroup and autosomal in private as most personal info gets deleted on threads, technically under 4 percent doesn't count it's because at that point they are not taking 100 percent of the persons Chromosomes into account.

Northumbrian yes, that would make sense of your score especially the Irish input you have too
 
I have very little or no Irish confirmed, It is majority English, with a bit of Scottish, My family were mostly from Yorkshire,Co Durham and Northumberland, with some in Southern England which may reflect the 29.3% LivingDNA gave me, and if Northumbria Includes Yorkshire then the 54.3% living DNA also gave me, may also be right, and added together it would match almost exactly the 80.7% 23 & Me gave.
 
I have very little or no Irish confirmed, It is majority English, with a bit of Scottish.
You just said Irish well Irish Scottish whatever the Celts mainly settled in the Midlands and North

Anglo Saxons are South English mainly people from North England are more Viking but there is some intermixing and all that
 
Also Vikings/Danes were more Trønder the Saxons were Borreby
 
One more thing the name Britain Briton is actually Celtic/Welsh in origin because the Celts Welsh were here before the Saxon Jute Viking etc invasions. There was a whole study not along ago in how the Saxon and Viking migrations to the UK completely shifted the genetic input and make them/us essentially German or German Celtic mix also at that point those Celts would have been during the Mesolithic so think about that time period and how Nordic people were then.
 
Its the way they describe 'British' I think, because they state Great Britain and Ireland as a group, and do not separate the Irish from the British, the Irish was included as 8.3% 'Great Britain and Ireland unassigned', so they don't know where its from, and 'cannot confirm any Irish' as its likely to be more British, possibly English or Scottish.
 
Its the way they describe 'British' I think, because they state Great Britain and Ireland as a group, and do not separate the Irish from the British, the Irish was included in the under 8% 'Great Britain and Ireland unassigned', so they don't know where its from, and 'cannot confirm any Irish' as its likely to be more British, possibly English or Scottish.
It's kind of interchangeable not that much of a difference between anyone in the UK to be honest. I am going to message you in private with my Dad's haplogroups as autosomal will collect the data from both my parents and put their haplogroup results together in all of my dna please message me back with your results when you have time I am interested how a native English man could have H no matter what part of England he is from, very interesting indeed!
 
Hello Lenab
I sent a pm regarding your dna information but it was too late you already sent it, not sure if you got mine, Sorry but I do not want to send my data, as it is all numbers, and Im still trying to figure it out.

Regarding my Y Haplogroup its a strange one, and there's not much known about it, H is basically an Indian marker Y Haplogroup, but mine contains the positive SNP P-96, along side M9313, which has been confirmed by further testings by another lad to represent haplogroup Y,H2a1 which separates it from the H1 & H3 groups that are Indian related.

There is another European H a Romany Y H1a,( Y H1a Romany left india around 1500 yrs ago) which has no connection to my Y H2a1, despite it being the only other Y H in Europe.

Its assumed that H2 P-96 is a very old European Haplogroup, possibly predating the farmer arrival. I can only await further developments both ancient and modern in the hope of figuring this out.
 

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