The Genetic Legacy of Ancient Gaul

Friesday

Regular Member
Messages
53
Reaction score
41
Points
18
Y-DNA haplogroup
R-Z17
The Genetic Legacy of Ancient Gaul: Insights into Social Organization and Human Mobility during the Roman Empire

Page 226

F5wlJKQWAAARd6q


The abstract describes a research project that aimed to explore the genetic legacy of ancient Gaul, which was a significant province in the Roman Empire. The study focuses on understanding the social organization and human mobility in Gaul during the Roman period by analyzing genome-wide data from 170 individuals across 31 archaeological sites in modern-day France.
This data is also correlated with archaeological and anthropological evidence to provide a multi-dimensional view of ancient Gaulish society.

Key Points:
Context: The Roman Empire was vast, multi-ethnic, and multicultural, lasting from 27 BCE to 476 CE. Gaul (now France) was a strategically important province in the empire, serving as a link between the Mediterranean and Northern Europe.

1. Human Mobility and Infrastructure: The study acknowledges the construction of Roman roads, aqueducts, and public works that facilitated trade, communication, and human mobility in Gaul.

2. Genetic Diversity: Genetic analyses were performed on samples from 170 individuals, revealing a diverse genetic makeup. However, the number of samples allowed the researchers to identify subtle regional genetic structures within Gaul.

3. Cosmopolitanism and Funerary Practices: The study found varying degrees of cosmopolitanism in different regions, with some being linked to specific funerary practices. This could potentially indicate different levels or types of interactions with other cultures or populations.

4. Continuity with Iron Age: Despite Roman rule and influence, the genetic makeup of the population showed continuity with Iron Age populations, suggesting that the impact of Roman occupation was not as pronounced at the genetic level.

6. Cultural vs. Genetic Impact: The Roman cultural imprint is visible in art, architecture, language, and society in the region. However, the study suggests that this cultural influence did not significantly alter the genome of the Gaulish population.

7. Insight into Social Organization and Mobility: Through the analysis of genomes and by studying necropolises, the research provides new insights into the social organization and patterns of human mobility in ancient Gaul.

Implications
The study is significant because it offers a nuanced view of the impact of Roman rule in Gaul, contrasting the cultural and infrastructural changes with the more modest changes in the genetic makeup of the population. It highlights the complexity of human history, where cultural and genetic influences don't always move in lockstep. Moreover, by combining genetic data with archaeological and anthropological evidence, the study contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of ancient societies.
 
Very promising paper and sampling with 170 individuals from 31 sites included. It seems, going after this, that there was a cline of South Eastern/East Mediterranean admixture within the Roman Empire from Southern Italy -> Central Italy -> Northern Italy -> Gaul -> Britain.
Since samples from Germany being processed as well, but from a more Romanised site, we can contrast many sites and regions. Would be logical if Southern France would have had more Imperial Roman shift than the North.
 
Very promising paper and sampling with 170 individuals from 31 sites included. It seems, going after this, that there was a cline of South Eastern/East Mediterranean admixture within the Roman Empire from Southern Italy -> Central Italy -> Northern Italy -> Gaul -> Britain.
Since samples from Germany being processed as well, but from a more Romanised site, we can contrast many sites and regions. Would be logical if Southern France would have had more Imperial Roman shift than the North.

No, most French samples from the Late Antiquity and Early to Middle Ages show continuity with those from the Iron Age.

And my modern French samples (North, Center, South, East and West), which include 16 great-great-grandparents without “Italian” ancestors (neither North, nor Center, nor South), Spanish, etc., show a continuity with the French samples from the Middle Ages to the Iron Age.

The Gauls of the Iron Age present a diversity that we find in present-day France, an “intra-Gallic” diversity, which is not surprising. A modern South Eastern French could be close to a Eastern Gaulish.

Imperial Rome in modern French is between 0 and 15% and Imperial Rome has a republican admix with other thing.
 
what is the paper .............I cannot find it

The picenes where a liburnian colony from circa 1000BC to 440BC in Martinscuro , Tronto and other nearly picene colonies.............The Picenes either emerged as a Italic-Liburnian people or the Liburnian where fully gone by 440BC

This below is the last I saw about it ( 2021 ) and I an awaiting the paper of this video

 
It appears you screenshotted the wrong abstract. The one on the previous page was about the Gauls I think.

Either way, both look to be very interesting. I'm especially interested in what U152 subclades show up.
 
No, most French samples from the Late Antiquity and Early to Middle Ages show continuity with those from the Iron Age. Here. And my modern French samples (North, Center, South, East and West), which include 16 great-great-grandparents without “Italian” ancestors (neither North, nor Center, nor South), Spanish, etc., show a continuity with the French samples from the Middle Ages to the Iron Age. The Gauls of the Iron Age present a diversity that we find in present-day France, an “intra-Gallic” diversity, which is not surprising. A modern South Eastern French could be close to a Eastern Gaulish.
Imperial Rome in modern French is between 0 and 15% and Imperial Rome has a republican admix with other thing.
Interesting research! But many cultures are intertwined and only in-depth analysis with a versatile approach can provide approximate data!
 
Interesting research! But many cultures are intertwined and only in-depth analysis with a versatile approach can provide approximate data!

I didn't understand what you meant. Be more precise and understandable.

Culture does not matter: simply collect modern French samples from France with genealogical criteria such as 8 great-grandparents or 16 great-great-grandparents and compare them with ancient samples from France. Iron Age to the French Middle Ages.

Obviously, by “French samples” I don’t mean the Corsican ones, because they are not French. I'm talking about French natives who have been in France since the 16th century and yes it exists, and yes I have samples which have a genealogy dating back to the 16-17th century and no it is not "rare".
 
Very promising paper and sampling with 170 individuals from 31 sites included. It seems, going after this, that there was a cline of South Eastern/East Mediterranean admixture within the Roman Empire from Southern Italy -> Central Italy -> Northern Italy -> Gaul -> Britain.
Since samples from Germany being processed as well, but from a more Romanised site, we can contrast many sites and regions. Would be logical if Southern France would have had more Imperial Roman shift than the North.
You might add Iberia to this cline of South Eastern/East Mediterranean admixture within the Roman Empire. Upcoming paper about Iberia:

IMG_9927.png
 
You might add Iberia to this cline of South Eastern/East Mediterranean admixture within the Roman Empire. Upcoming paper about Iberia:

View attachment 14187
I wonder about the percentages for migrants in Iberia too. Like we see from the samples taken so far, that the incoming Germanic-related migrants, plus their allies and servants, were already mixed and not all purely Northern European. I therefore really wonder about the total impact of the migrations on the Iberian and Italian peninsulae. The total impact might be fairly high.
 
The Genetic Legacy of Ancient Gaul: Insights into Social Organization and Human Mobility during the Roman Empire

Page 226

F5wlJKQWAAARd6q


The abstract describes a research project that aimed to explore the genetic legacy of ancient Gaul, which was a significant province in the Roman Empire. The study focuses on understanding the social organization and human mobility in Gaul during the Roman period by analyzing genome-wide data from 170 individuals across 31 archaeological sites in modern-day France.
This data is also correlated with archaeological and anthropological evidence to provide a multi-dimensional view of ancient Gaulish society.

Key Points:
Context: The Roman Empire was vast, multi-ethnic, and multicultural, lasting from 27 BCE to 476 CE. Gaul (now France) was a strategically important province in the empire, serving as a link between the Mediterranean and Northern Europe.

1. Human Mobility and Infrastructure: The study acknowledges the construction of Roman roads, aqueducts, and public works that facilitated trade, communication, and human mobility in Gaul.

2. Genetic Diversity: Genetic analyses were performed on samples from 170 individuals, revealing a diverse genetic makeup. However, the number of samples allowed the researchers to identify subtle regional genetic structures within Gaul.

3. Cosmopolitanism and Funerary Practices: The study found varying degrees of cosmopolitanism in different regions, with some being linked to specific funerary practices. This could potentially indicate different levels or types of interactions with other cultures or populations.

4. Continuity with Iron Age: Despite Roman rule and influence, the genetic makeup of the population showed continuity with Iron Age populations, suggesting that the impact of Roman occupation was not as pronounced at the genetic level.

6. Cultural vs. Genetic Impact: The Roman cultural imprint is visible in art, architecture, language, and society in the region. However, the study suggests that this cultural influence did not significantly alter the genome of the Gaulish population.

7. Insight into Social Organization and Mobility: Through the analysis of genomes and by studying necropolises, the research provides new insights into the social organization and patterns of human mobility in ancient Gaul.

Implications
The study is significant because it offers a nuanced view of the impact of Roman rule in Gaul, contrasting the cultural and infrastructural changes with the more modest changes in the genetic makeup of the population. It highlights the complexity of human history, where cultural and genetic influences don't always move in lockstep. Moreover, by combining genetic data with archaeological and anthropological evidence, the study contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of ancient societies.
Can we create a new thread for this abstract about the Picenes? I'd rather not derail the discussion about the Gauls but this is a very interesting abstract to me.
 
Dyeus-Pater grant me more patience for these papers amen.
 

This thread has been viewed 1926 times.

Back
Top