Why it is wrong to assume that a haplogroup originated where it is most frequent now

You aren't alone with this POV, it seems, Maciamo. There is controversy surrounding the location of origin for Haplogroup E because of conflicting perspectives, yours being an example of the position that West Asia-proponents take on the matter. I do stand by what geneticists tell us, as they are the experts, but, at the same time, I don't think theories like yours can be ruled out.
 
3. Have you read "The 10,000 Year Explosion"? The authors of that book argue that the spread of IE was vastly exacerbated by the lactase mutation which they believe arose in the protoIE people of the steppe. Then, there arises the question why this mutation would be most prevalent in the some of the least genetically IE people of Europe, the Scandinavians. I guess the explanation is that genes that have a procreational advantage don't follow the same patterns as silent mutations in Y chromosomes. What do you think?

Yes, lactose tolerance is autosomal and could easily decouple from Y or Mt DNA of its original carriers. It flowed freely through populations following spread of domesticated cows, or other words the best climatic conditions for herding them. In far past central Asia was moist and green with best conditions for herding. Since 5-4 thousand years ago it started to dry out, at the same time central Europe became mild and moist with rich grass cover, creating the best conditions for herding. For that reason lactose tolerance turned to be a great benefit to the people of central Europe and had spread to over 90% of population in this region. Regardless of paternal and maternal chromosomes.
Interesting example, though in reverse, is how R1b people went to central Africa, few thousands years ago, and completely lost white skin color. Obviously, there was no benefit of having white skin there in tropics. Possibly rampant skin cancer and vitamin D overdose.
 
Yes, lactose tolerance is autosomal and could easily decouple from Y or Mt DNA of its original carriers. It flowed freely through populations following spread of domesticated cows, or other words the best climatic conditions for herding them. In far past central Asia was moist and green with best conditions for herding. Since 5-4 thousand years ago it started to dry out, at the same time central Europe became mild and moist with rich grass cover, creating the best conditions for herding. For that reason lactose tolerance turned to be a great benefit to the people of central Europe and had spread to over 90% of population in this region. Regardless of paternal and maternal chromosomes.
Interesting example, though in reverse, is how R1b people went to central Africa, few thousands years ago, and completely lost white skin color. Obviously, there was no benefit of having white skin there in tropics. Possibly rampant skin cancer and vitamin D overdose.

I partially agree - but I don't believe lost or acquisition of "good" autosomal genes work so quickly - genome is a complicated and interacting grouping of genes conditionning success of new genes and a population without the "right" gene don't create it on command - and even the "bad" genes are not lost so quickly - sometimes, in a heterozygotic condition, the "bad" genes are conserved by a population because it has some benefic effect versus other diseases - in Africa, people living for thouseands of years even at the same latitudes haven't always the same pigmentation so the natural selection plays a veryrole but isn't a magic stick -
and crossings between populations doesn't always sweep bad genes away: a survey on cystic fibrosis in Europe and Australia showed this disease "very" present among Irish peoeple, British people and ex British colonies (Australia), french Bretons, Scandinavians and less strong, in other populations: the Czechs scientists found 3 principal mutations on the concerned gene: one typical of 'Celts' (irish, british, breton), one typicla of north people (danish ...) and one typical of Slavs: the Czech people presented 2 of these mutations: the 'celtic' one and the 'slavic' one !!! interesting for crossings and history too -
 

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