World Cup 2022

Asking forum members one more license to talk about the languages ​​of Messi, Maradona, Pelé, Eusebio and Cristiano Ronaldo, comparatively: In this particular video, we also have a word guessing game between a Brazilian, a Chilean, a Spanish and a Mexican. Guessing is simple and the four participants have an excellent diction of Portuguese and Spanish, which makes the perception of accents and languages ​​and the differences more interesting. Subtitles in English.


Random question: When Maradona and Messi spoke with the likes of Pele, Ronaldinho and Ronaldo: In which language did they communicate?
 
Random question: When Maradona and Messi spoke with the likes of Pele, Ronaldinho and Ronaldo: In which language did they communicate?

In a hypothetical meeting between Messi, Maradona, Pelé, Ronaldo and Ronaldinho, I imagine that the language chosen for the talks would be Spanish. Messi and Maradona are native speakers of Spanish, Ronaldo and Ronaldinho are native speakers of Portuguese, but they played for a long time in Spain. Pelé speaks Portuguese and English, but for a Portuguese speaker there is no difficulty in understanding Spanish and Pelé would count on the help of Ronaldo and Ronaldinho to help him with any translation from Portuguese to Spanish that might be necessary. In resume, it will be a conversation of mates in Spanish.
 
rest in peace
skysports-ginaluca-vialli-football_6015958.jpg
 
In a hypothetical meeting between Messi, Maradona, Pelé, Ronaldo and Ronaldinho,
I am confused about your "hypothetical" rhetoric. They all have met. Do I need to be more direct?
Here it goes:
In which language did the above communicate?
 
I am confused about your "hypothetical" rhetoric. They all have met. Do I need to be more direct?
Here it goes:
In which language did the above communicate?

Hmm. You are a “gentleman”. I can tell you that “mineiros” like me follow the traditional rhetoric of the “gentlemen” of the State of Minas Gerais: give an ox to not get into a fight and a whole herd to not get out of one. In principle, my intention was to leave him in a vacuum, without an objective answer, as my son would, for example. Maybe today I'm a little more sensitive than usual to think that your question is a gratuitous gringo rudeness but here's a direct answer, since you think I abuse rhetoric: Spanish
 
^^I have no idea what you're talking about. Duarte is a valued member of our community, a gentleman at all times, and I do not now see nor ever have seen him say anything remotely racist. You couldn't do better than model your comportment after his.
 
Again, meaningless rhetoric, racism and so much more... after all you got the answer probably right.

I think you must be with some personal problem that affects your logical reasoning ability. I have never been a racist person and I cannot see what action or omission on my part here in this forum would have led you to deduce this nonsense that I am a racist person. I remind you that in my country racism and racial injury are imprescriptible and non-bailable crimes and the penalties can vary from 2 to 5 years of imprisonment and a fine and that slanderous denunciation is also a crime and, certainly, under the laws of my country, I have never committed or was denounced by these crimes, including racism.
 
^^I have no idea what you're talking about. Duarte is a valued member of our community, a gentleman at all times, and I do not now see nor ever have seen him say anything remotely racist. You couldn't do better than model your comportment after his.

^^Angela. Apparently, he deducted that “gringo” is a pejorative and racist term. It turns out that in Brazil this term is not pejorative and even less racist. It is used as a synonym for foreigner. In Brazil, the term gringo is used to refer to any foreign person, regardless of the country of origin, visiting or already residing in Brazil. For example. In a company, an employee can make the following statement to other co-workers: A new employee is going to join the company, and it looks like he's a gringo. It's not an offense. Means the same as: A new employee is going to join the company, and it seems that he is a foreigner. It's a Brazilian slang. If anyone else was offended by what I said, I apologize as that was not my intention.
 
^^Angela. Apparently, he deducted that “gringo” is a pejorative and racist term. It turns out that in Brazil this term is not pejorative and even less racist. It is used as a synonym for foreigner. In Brazil, the term gringo is used to refer to any foreign person, regardless of the country of origin, visiting or already residing in Brazil. For example. In a company, an employee can make the following statement to other co-workers: A new employee is going to join the company, and it looks like he's a gringo. It's not an offense. Means the same as: A new employee is going to join the company, and it seems that he is a foreigner. It's a Brazilian slang. If anyone else was offended by what I said, I apologize as that was not my intention.


many theories of gringo

used in Mexico to tell the “green” uniformed USA soldiers to “go” ...............as in home back to USA.
 
many theories of gringo
used in Mexico to tell the “green” uniformed USA soldiers to “go” ...............as in home back to USA.

Yes. There are many stories for the origin of the term.

One of the most told around here is that the word “gringo” came from the word “Grego” (Greek in Portuguese). The term came into use because of the expression “falar grego” - “speaking Greek" during the 18th century.

That's because Greek was considered a very difficult language to understand. So when foreigners spoke incomprehensibly, it was said to sound like “Grego” (Greek). Over time, the word “Grego” (Greek) came to be used to refer to foreigners in general, assuming the pronunciation and spelling “gringo” with the passage of time, maybe by influence of the Spanish.
 
^^Angela. Apparently, he deducted that “gringo” is a pejorative and racist term. It turns out that in Brazil this term is not pejorative and even less racist. It is used as a synonym for foreigner. In Brazil, the term gringo is used to refer to any foreign person, regardless of the country of origin, visiting or already residing in Brazil. For example. In a company, an employee can make the following statement to other co-workers: A new employee is going to join the company, and it looks like he's a gringo. It's not an offense. Means the same as: A new employee is going to join the company, and it seems that he is a foreigner. It's a Brazilian slang. If anyone else was offended by what I said, I apologize as that was not my intention.

It is curious how many expressions that we Latin Americans use are misinterpreted. Here in Uruguay, the word "gringo" was also used as a synonym for foreigner, not just American. In fact, it was applied to Italian immigrants, perhaps because, since most of northern Italy, there were many blondes and blue-eyed. They called my grandfather "gringo" more than once. Even the nickname was extended to my father...it was funny to hear a friend of the family (of Italian origin!), call my father "gringo", perhaps because he is blond and blue-eyed. And about other misinterpreted words... Uruguayan footballer Edinson Cavani had a pretty bad time in England, when after scoring a spectacular goal for Manchester United, he received congratulations on social media from a friend of him from Uruguay, and he responded saying "Gracias, negrito!"...He was immediately censured, accused of being racist, penalized with money, and they made him apologize in a thousand different ways...despite the protests of his friend who said: hey, he's my friend ! He didn't insult me, he always called me that way!!!
 
It is interesting how some expressions used by Latin Americans can be misinterpreted. In Uruguay, the term "gringo" was also used to refer to foreigners in general, not just Americans. It was even applied to Italian immigrants, perhaps because many of them had blond hair and blue eyes, especially those from northern Italy. My grandfather was called "gringo" more than once, and the nickname spread to my father as well. It was quite amusing to hear a family friend of Italian descent call my father "gringo," probably because of his blond hair and blue eyes. By the way you know they don't play games like this, which there are reviews of here https://casinosanalyzer.com/online-casinos/candyland.casino say they can't get the point) Speaking of misinterpreted words, Uruguayan soccer player Edinson Cavani faced a tough time in England. After scoring a stunning goal against Manchester United, he received congratulations on social media from his Uruguayan friend. In response, he said: "Gracias, negrito!" which prompted an immediate reaction. He was accused of racism, fined and forced to apologize in various ways, despite his friend's protests. His friend understood that it was an affectionate expression, as they always addressed each other that way.
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This is my post....

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