Do you believe that Y-DNA influences looks and behaviour?

Do you think that Y-chromosomal DNA has an influence on phenotype?

  • No, Y-DNA does not influence looks or behaviour at all

    Votes: 32 32.7%
  • Y-DNA might possibly have a minor influence on man's behaviour, but not on his physical appearance

    Votes: 7 7.1%
  • Y-DNA most probably influences a man's behaviour, but has no effect on physical appearance at all

    Votes: 1 1.0%
  • Y-DNA slightly influences a man's physical appearance, but not his behaviour

    Votes: 7 7.1%
  • Y-DNA considerably influences a man's physical appearance, but not his behaviour

    Votes: 1 1.0%
  • Y-DNA slightly influences a man's physical appearance and his behaviour

    Votes: 24 24.5%
  • Y-DNA considerably influences a man's physical appearance and his behaviour

    Votes: 11 11.2%
  • No idea !

    Votes: 15 15.3%

  • Total voters
    98
I do belong to Y-DNA hg. R1a*, but I do identify myself with hg. J2a. I love hg. J2a more than hg. R1a. I wanted to be hg. J2a. According to me it is a 'civilization' (Greeks/Roman/Aryan (Median Empire)/Indus Valley etc.) marker. All great civilization were found because of J2a. It is the coolest/best and most influential haplogroup ever.


And I believe that I do look like Y-DNA hg. J2a, lol if that is even possible. And I do want to be J2a.


Am I a TRANS-haplogrouper? I'm 100% male, and I do feel sexually attracted to females, so I'm not homosexual and not a hermaphrodite / transgender).


But great to know that I'm still not 'normal'. Because I'm a TRANS-haplogrouper.
 
So human being can get (indirectly via mother) some chromosomes from her/his maternal grandfather.
Well that's the case with me,as i stated in the previous thread,the physical traits i inherited and are more visible is trough my grandfather on maternal side,such is stature,eye,hair color etc,so Y-chromosome taken by your father is not the only one that influence human look and perhaps no more relevant when it comes to appearance/look.
 
Well that's the case with me,as i stated in the previous thread,the physical traits i inherited and are more visible is trough my grandfather on maternal side,such is stature,eye,hair color etc,so Y-chromosome taken by your father is not the only one that influence human look and perhaps no more relevant when it comes to appearance/look.
Females don't even have Y chromosome. Y chromosome 'package' doesn't have lots of genes, it can only change the balance of hormones that can determine sexes.


But let say it is max. 1/46 % = 0.02174% influential on our appearance.


What about this?


My mother looks like her father, she is a copy of him. But she has no Y chromosome. She got her father's genes (genetic data) via his 23 other chromosomes. He was my favourite grandpa.


I do look much more like my father's mother, my paternal grandmom's family. My father looks also like his mother.
 
I do belong to Y-DNA hg. R1a*, but I do identify myself with hg. J2a. I love hg. J2a more than hg. R1a. I wanted to be hg. J2a. According to me it is a 'civilization' (Greeks/Roman/Aryan (Median Empire)/Indus Valley etc.) marker. All great civilization were found because of J2a. It is the coolest/best and most influential haplogroup ever.


And I believe that I do look like Y-DNA hg. J2a, lol if that is even possible. And I do want to be J2a.


Am I a TRANS-haplogrouper? I'm 100% male, and I do feel sexually attracted to females, so I'm not homosexual and not a hermaphrodite / transgender).


But great to know that I'm still not 'normal'. Because I'm a TRANS-haplogrouper.
You're seriously upset over a haplogroup? You need to learn to accept who you are. Your forefathers were of the R1a line, and thus associated with the Aryans. This should be something to be proud of.
 
when you get Mtdna from your mother , she gives you also a part of her paternal genes................you do not get only her maternal side

I suggest you read my page Understanding the Human Genome and Genetics. I thought that most long-term members who have read it at this point. I think you should even start by the basic tutorial videos here.

For a start, mtDNA means mitochondrial DNA. This is a tiny DNA sequence that makes up only 0,000005% of the human genome and is contains in the cell's hundreds of mitochondria (a type of organelle of bacterial origin that provide energy for the cell). The 23 pairs of chromosome are contained in the cell's nucleus. Just in case you did not get this, mitochondrial DNA is not part of the chromosomal DNA. It is completely separate. The reason why mtDNA is inherited from one's mother is that the spermatozoa lose their mtDNA when they fertilise the ovum, so that only the ovum's mtDNA remains inside that first body cell. I thought that they taught that in biology classes in junior high school. I guess not in every country (or rather not everyone paid attention in class).

Are you saying that all other chromosomes come only via ydna .....and only the X chromosome comes form Mtdna ?

What does this sentence even mean. Y-DNA means the Y chromosome. So by definition it is only one chromosome. It is not mean the 23 chromosomes inherited from one's father!!! (I rarely use exclamation marks, but this time it was deserved)

See above for mtDNA vs X chromosome.
 
Going back to the poll question, I see that only about a third of forum members have any idea of what role the Y chromosome plays in human biology. It was not really an opinion poll, because there are correct and incorrect answers. As LeBrok said it, without the Y chromosome we would all be women, so it can't be argued that it has both physical and behavioural effects, since men do not look nor behave/think like women.

The Y-chromosome contains 59 million base pairs and over 200 genes, i.e. about 1% of a man's genes. It is reasonable to think that the phenotypic effect of Y-DNA should not be much greater than 1%. However that figure doesn't mean much because 98% of our genome is identical to chimpanzees and 60% identical to fruit flies. (see Percentage of genetic similarity between humans and animals)

That also presupposes that all genes have an effect on physical appearance or behaviour, but that is not the case. Most genes regulate biochemical processes that are invisible to the naked eye. But it is clear that Y-DNA does have visible effects (apart from genitals), otherwise men would be just like women when dressed, but they do not.

It is not only the production of testosterone by the testes that differentiate a man from a woman either. Inject women with testosterone and they will grow beards and become more aggressive. But they won't really look like men, just masculinised women, and that is not the same at all. They also won't think and behave like men, nor will they suddenly become lesbian. I have never heard that female body builders taking regular testosterone shots suddenly developed a intuitive sense of directions, started dressing badly, and stopped being able to find the cheese in the fridge.

Obviously not all men are equal, and not all the differences in manliness can be attributed to Y chromosomes. In fact most differences are rooted in other chromosomes, including the X chromosome, which for example plays a major role in male baldness (as the androgen receptors are located on the X-DNA). So the impact of the Y chromosomal genes is always moderated by and dependent on the rest of one's genome. One of the basic rules of genetics is that most genes work with and are influenced by other genes. So the same Y-DNA will not have exactly the same effect on everyone, but it is not the same as saying it doesn't have any effect.

I have explained in this thread which mutations on Y-chromosomal genes I believe could have been selected due to the potential evolutionary advantages they confer to their carriers. It isn't clear if these advantages are reproductive, physical or behavioural, or a mix of them. What is certain is that some important mutations took place in the SRY gene, which strongly affect male characteristics, define major haplogroups like E, O2b and R1a.
 
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I have explained in this thread which mutations on Y-chromosomal genes I believe could have been selected due to the potential evolutionary advantages they confer to their carriers. It isn't clear if these advantages are reproductive, physical or behavioural, or a mix of them. What is certain is that some important mutations took place in the SRY gene, which strongly affect male characteristics, define major haplogroups like E, O2b and R1a.
It'll be the fun part once the mystery starts to unravel.
 
It'll be the fun part once the mystery starts to unravel.

I think the mystery is already sarting to unravel - the more haplogroups of different people with the same HG comes out, the more we see they have nothing (or very few - on a human being basis) in common. Of course it's impossible to rationally argue with an idea that is in it's fundamental level a preconceived one. Like the idea that northern europeans are very industrious people and southern very slacker ones. This thread, in my opinion and withouth disrespect, is an attempt to justify it genetically.
 
I suggest you read my page Understanding the Human Genome and Genetics. I thought that most long-term members who have read it at this point. I think you should even start by the basic tutorial videos here.

For a start, mtDNA means mitochondrial DNA. This is a tiny DNA sequence that makes up only 0,000005% of the human genome and is contains in the cell's hundreds of mitochondria (a type of organelle of bacterial origin that provide energy for the cell). The 23 pairs of chromosome are contained in the cell's nucleus. Just in case you did not get this, mitochondrial DNA is not part of the chromosomal DNA. It is completely separate. The reason why mtDNA is inherited from one's mother is that the spermatozoa lose their mtDNA when they fertilise the ovum, so that only the ovum's mtDNA remains inside that first body cell. I thought that they taught that in biology classes in junior high school. I guess not in every country (or rather not everyone paid attention in class).



What does this sentence even mean. Y-DNA means the Y chromosome. So by definition it is only one chromosome. It is not mean the 23 chromosomes inherited from one's father!!! (I rarely use exclamation marks, but this time it was deserved)

See above for mtDNA vs X chromosome.

brought this up when I was referring to the same as post #24
I don't know why you
brought this up when I was referring to the same as post #24
:LOL:

read links in post#24 for an easy understanding
 
brought this up when I was referring to the same as post #24
I don't know why you
brought this up when I was referring to the same as post #24
:LOL:

read links in post#24 for an easy understanding
I hope you took some time to upgrade your knowledge. So is there X chromosome on MtDNA?
 
You should see what happens to moderators! :)
 
Ben Affleck could be easily a descendent of Roman auxiliar or a Roman colonizer in Britannia.
 
True. I did read his wiki, and he is of full Northern European descent but there could be a small dash from Southern Europe
 
Ben Affleck could be easily a descendent of Roman auxiliar or a Roman colonizer in Britannia.

There are plenty of Northern Europeans who are swarthy, who look like stero typical Italians or Spanish. There are definitely more of them than there are redheads.
 
I would say no, since I have group I y-Dna which is a haplogroup found in scandanvian countries but I have no resemblance to scandanavian people(stereotypically) and contain almost no scandanavian autosomal Dna. While I could be wrong it seemed unusual that I had a haplogroup found in scandanvians but resembled southern German instead of a Dane.
 
I would say no, since I have group I y-Dna which is a haplogroup found in scandanvian countries but I have no resemblance to scandanavian people(stereotypically) and contain almost no scandanavian autosomal Dna. While I could be wrong it seemed unusual that I had a haplogroup found in scandanvians but resembled southern German instead of a Dane.
Perhaps Maciamo should have given below example when versing his main question:
If there were "identical" twins, but one with hg R1b and the other with I1, how different they would be? Would there be physical differences or maybe only behavioral ones?
 
Ancestry informative SNPs are usually non-coding - they're junk DNA. If they are used to track a recent immigration there will be some implications with regards to the phenotypes associated with those SNPs of course. But that's about all there is to it.
 
Let's randomly pick up Haplogroup R1b-U106 and see some of its members

Felipe of Spain
King-Felipe-of-Spain-1.jpg


James Watson
James%2BWatson%2Byoung.jpg


Craig Venter
dizi600.jpg


Malcolm Gladwell
full_malcolm_gladwell.jpg


I don't see any similarities among them.
 

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