Do you believe that Y-DNA influences looks and behaviour?

Do you think that Y-chromosomal DNA has an influence on phenotype?

  • No, Y-DNA does not influence looks or behaviour at all

    Votes: 32 32.7%
  • Y-DNA might possibly have a minor influence on man's behaviour, but not on his physical appearance

    Votes: 7 7.1%
  • Y-DNA most probably influences a man's behaviour, but has no effect on physical appearance at all

    Votes: 1 1.0%
  • Y-DNA slightly influences a man's physical appearance, but not his behaviour

    Votes: 7 7.1%
  • Y-DNA considerably influences a man's physical appearance, but not his behaviour

    Votes: 1 1.0%
  • Y-DNA slightly influences a man's physical appearance and his behaviour

    Votes: 24 24.5%
  • Y-DNA considerably influences a man's physical appearance and his behaviour

    Votes: 11 11.2%
  • No idea !

    Votes: 15 15.3%

  • Total voters
    98
Let's randomly pick up Haplogroup R1b-U106 and see some of its members

Felipe of Spain


James Watson


Craig Venter


Malcolm Gladwell


I don't see any similarities among them.
Really? Time for new glasses. They all have oval faces, big noses, two ears, two eyes, lips, all smart, all men, all human, etc. I'm not sure what is due to Y chromosome, but there are plenty of similarities. Look again.
 
Really? Time for new glasses. They all have oval faces, big noses, two ears, two eyes, lips, all smart, all men, all human, etc. I'm not sure what is due to Y chromosome, but there are plenty of similarities. Look again.

lol you missed my point
 
im almost positive there must be some kind of behavioral influnce from different y haplogroups. As already stated it obviously affects us as men, but do differnt haplogroups have different effects? i think they do, i mean sexual hormones are obviously affcted by the y chromosome, if different genetic mutations can clearly lead to infertllity, then obviously this can have an affect on ones behvior. I also think Looks coud come into Play as well here,but probably to a lesser extent than behavior.
 
Autosmal dna, environment and diet would have a more important role in behavior and appearance in my opinion. Its too simplistic to put some form of Look or behavior simply on Y or Mtdna. The brain is stimulated and adapt to the necessity for survival in the environment it lives in and adapts accordingly irrelevant to were its Y or Mtdan has mutated.
 
Really? Time for new glasses. They all have oval faces, big noses, two ears, two eyes, lips, all smart, all men, all human, etc. I'm not sure what is due to Y chromosome, but there are plenty of similarities. Look again.

All mammals, all animals, all organisms etc :)
 
Autosmal dna, environment and diet would have a more important role in behavior and appearance in my opinion. Its too simplistic to put some form of Look or behavior simply on Y or Mtdna. The brain is stimulated and adapt to the necessity for survival in the environment it lives in and adapts accordingly irrelevant to were its Y or Mtdan has mutated.

Yes but it's obviously already known autosomal DNA and environment affect both appearance and behavior. The question is weather y-dna alone has an affect on this
 
This is the man who was found to be of haplogroup A1a

HgA1a-banner.jpg

I mean, if these guys have similar features, then everyone can be said to have similar features to everyone

but hey, haplogroup A1 is very old, you can make a chinese and an arab in one haplogroup if you consider A1's age

haplogroup I2
I2Famous.jpg

Rectangular eye orbits, high nose bridge, prominent ears. Eddie Ezzard doesnt seem to fit to be honest.
 
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the human genome has over 3 billion base pairs
the Y-chromosome has abt 58 million, less than 2 %
afaik no genes have yet been identified within the Y-DNA
 
We need the mutation rate of the Y chromosome (two times higher?) and the difference in selective pressure between men and women (one man reproducing for every four women?)

Sexual selection needs to be taken into account as well. Men select for looks, women select for mental traits.

So Y-DNA should primarily influence mental traits, somewhere between 5 and 10%, but this would be higher for men of the same race with different Y haplogroups.
 
Remarkably little variation in proteins encoded by the Y chromosome's single-copy genes, implying effective purifying selection identifies mutations within the X-degenerate gene and pseudogene region associated with all the main Y haplogroups.

What is certain is that some important mutations took place in the SRY gene, which strongly affect male characteristics, define major haplogroups like E, O2b and R1a.
Do those mutations actually affect the functioning of SRY in any way though?

As far as I can tell neither SRY10381 nor SRY4064/M40 (E) is located within SRY gene itself, or even close enough to be within the promoter region. SRY465 (O2b) is within the gene but it is a synonymous mutation so doesn't change the gene product.
 
the human genome has over 3 billion base pairs
the Y-chromosome has abt 58 million, less than 2 %
afaik no genes have yet been identified within the Y-DNA
Are genes necessary for DNA to express mental or physical differences? I don't believe so.

It's known that European men are more likely to have blue eyes than women, somewhere around %5 to %10. This variation is however difficult to observe as women are more likely to have green eyes, but it's there. You can't look at a blue-eyed guy and claim he's I12a however. So even if Y-Haplogroup has a significant influence (5-10%) you wouldn't readily observe it because the autosomal influence is much higher.

Our brains are very capable though, so people who are good at recognizing faces might see patterns when there are small changes in multiple attributes.

This theory is easily proved / disproved, except that most researchers wouldn't touch this subject with a 12 foot pole. We have enough reasons to hate each other as it is.
 
the human genome has over 3 billion base pairs
the Y-chromosome has abt 58 million, less than 2 %
afaik no genes have yet been identified within the Y-DNA

No genes? There are now over 200 known genes on the Y chromosome, a ten fold increase compared to what we knew 5 years ago. I wrote a lengthy article on how some mutations in Y-chromosomal genes were apparently favoured by natural selection. I mentioned some of the know Y-DNA gene functions (that includes non-fertility related things like bone growth and height), but of course we still don't know what most of those genes do. That doesn't mean they don't have important functions.
 
You should look into the father tongue hypothesis. This would suggest that the Basque originally had a majority Y haplogroup that was almost entirely replaced by R1b within the past 5000 years. But it also suggests that the success of R1b in Western Europe (and several other Y haplogroups) was not a reproductive one.

There's also proof of a 500% higher deletion rate of Neanderthal DNA on the X chromosome which supports your theory.
 
You should look into the father tongue hypothesis. This would suggest that the Basque originally had a majority Y haplogroup that was almost entirely replaced by R1b within the past 5000 years. But it also suggests that the success of R1b in Western Europe (and several other Y haplogroups) was not a reproductive one.

Do you mean something like that?
 
Not quite, the Basque living in a mountainous region would be the reason they didn't get invaded and retained their language, with R1b L11 starting out small and becoming dominant over time.

It should also be kept in mind that an Y haplogroup acquiring a mutation beneficial to the environment is an equally plausible explanation for bottlenecks. What is your estimated percentage of selection in favor of male sperm motility compared to beneficial traits in males of reproductive age?
 
Not quite, the Basque living in a mountainous region would be the reason they didn't get invaded and retained their language, with R1b L11 starting out small and becoming dominant over time.

It should also be kept in mind that an Y haplogroup acquiring a mutation beneficial to the environment is an equally plausible explanation for bottlenecks. What is your estimated percentage of selection in favor of male sperm motility compared to beneficial traits in males of reproductive age?

Most estimates give Basque as much Steppe ancestry as Spanish and SouthWest French. In most tests Basque are genetically distinct from Iberian because they lack NorthWest African and West Asian admixture which Iberians have some of(maybe 20% total).
 
Most estimates give Basque as much Steppe ancestry as Spanish and SouthWest French. In most tests Basque are genetically distinct from Iberian because they lack NorthWest African and West Asian admixture which Iberians have some of(maybe 20% total).
http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/32990-New-map-of-Yamna-admixture-(Eurogenes-Steppe-K10

Basque have 0% unless I'm looking at different data.


As for Y-linked traits, this study suggests in Finland Y-DNA mutations account for 15% of the genetic variance in alcoholism. The Y haplogroups have been obscured however.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC22445/

[FONT=&quot]Twin studies suggest that alcoholism has a heritability of ≈50% ([/FONT]50[FONT=&quot], [/FONT]51[FONT=&quot]). Using this figure and data from our population sample, we estimate that Y chromosome variability may account for ≈7% of the total variance and 15% of the genetic variance of alcoholism in these Finnish males.
[/FONT]
 
ADMIXTURE isn't good at determining ancestry from ancient people. Formal stats are good for that. In every formal stat test Basque score 25-30% Yamnaya.
 
The following graph from Haak et al is a handy one to keep in one's files. If I remember correctly, it's based on d-stats, not ADMIXTURE. According to their calculations, the Basque have a bit more steppe than Spaniards, but not much more. (I believe Basque here is French Basque, and Spanish North is Pais Vasco.)

Haak-et-al-2015-Figure-3-Admixture-Proportions-in-Modern-DNA-With-Linguistic-and-Historical-Origins-Added.png


I agree with Fire-Haired as to the unreliability of ADMIXTURE analysis when you're analyzing ancient samples.
 

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