Interesting Maps and Graphs

This map shows the death rate from all types of cancer, not the cancer rate. That's very different. The statistics for the cancer rates from the World Cancer Research Fund paint a very different picture, with Ireland, Hungary, the Benelux, France and Scandinavia topping the cancer rates. Yet treatments are better in these countries (except Hungary) so mortality from cancer is lower. One of the main causes of cancer is alcohol consumption and there is some correlation. South Europeans drink less alcohol and get less cancer. Of course genetics, diet and stress level play a role too.

"Celtic" zone seems to have the highest rates of cancer occurrence, with Greece, Spain, and especially Portugal among the lowest. Italy comes in 24th, just after Sweden.

RankCountryAge-standardised rate per 100,000
1Australia468.0
2New Zealand438.1
3Ireland373.7
4Hungary368.1
5US352.2
6Belgium345.8
7France (metropolitan)344.1
8Denmark340.4
9Norway337.8
10Netherlands334.1
11Canada334.0
12New Caledonia (France)324.2
13UK319.2
14South Korea313.5
15Germany313.1
16Switzerland311.0
17Luxembourg309.3
18Serbia307.9
19Slovenia304.9
20Latvia302.2
21Slovakia297.5
22Czech Republic296.7
23Sweden294.7
24Italy290.6
25Croatia287.2
26Lithuania285.8
27Estonia283.3
28Greece279.8
29Spain272.3
30Finland266.2
31Uruguay263.4
32Belarus260.7
33Portugal259.5
34Iceland257.8
35Guadelopue (France)254.6
36Puerto Rico254.5
37Moldova254.3
38Poland253.8
39Cyprus250.8
40Martinique (France)250.8
41Malta249.4
42Singapore248.9
43Japan248.0
44Austria247.7
45Barbados247.5
46French Guiana247.0
47Bulgaria242.8
48Lebanon242.8
49French Polynesia240.6
50Israel233.6
 
Maps showing concepts of borders of future Poland from the 1800s and first two decades of 1900s:

http://dspace.uni.lodz.pl:8080/xmlui/handle/11089/17060?show=full

English Summary:

"After the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth was liquidated and disappeared from the map of Europe at the end of the 18th century, and was partitioned by Russia, Prussia, and Austria, Polish activists of the independence movements never consented to the fact and continued to work for the revival of the Polish state. One of the issues pondered about was that of the future boundaries of this state. Initially, the issue was not complicated at all, since it was commonly held that the sole just solution would be the return to the historical boundaries of 1772. In the later period, the awareness arose that this option cannot be realised. This was not only the consequence of the stable and disadvantageous for Poland geopolitical situation in Europe, but also of the ethnic diversification of the territory of the former Commonwealth. That is why various concepts started to appear, concerning the future boundaries of Poland, considering the historical, geopolitical, strategic, and ethnic conditioning. These concepts were primarily the visions of individual scholars or activists, but often they did represent definite ideological and political orientations. The article presents and comments upon some of these designs. Those more original in substantive terms, and containing an interesting cartographic illustration, were selected for presentation. Thusthe article treats the concepts authored by: Oskar Żebrowski, Stanisław Tomaszewski, Aleksander Janowski, Czesław Jankowski, Włodzimierz Wakar, Wiktor Skarga-Dobrowolski, and J?zef Jask?lski. These concepts, postulating the shape of boundaries of Poland, differed significantly as to the general territorial reach of the country and the shapes of its boundaries. Some of them were of clear maximalist character, while other ones were more moderate, and so had higher chances of implementation. The two last proposals for the boundaries of Poland, presented in the article, were already the official documents. The first of those two represented the position of the Polish National Committee, which was active in Lausanne in the years 1917?1918. The last concept of the boundary of Poland, shown in the article, was the official stance of the authorities of the newly re-established Polish state, which was presented at the Peace Conference in Paris in 1919. This concept was developed by Roman Dmowski, who headed Polish delegation at this conference. At the end of the article this most important design, prepared for the Versailles conference, is compared to the actual course of boundaries of the Polish state as it re-emerged after the First World War."

PDF download link:

http://cejsh.icm.edu.pl/cejsh/element/bwmeta1.element.hdl_11089_17060/c/2-009_035-Eberhardt.pdf

This one shows by far the largest area, "Shape of Poland within its Natural Borders", from 1847:

DeqTurn.jpg


^^^
The area in the west around Poznań-Gniezno called "Kolebka Polan?w" = "Cradle of Poles".
 
Maps showing concepts of borders of future Poland from the 1800s and first two decades of 1900s:

http://dspace.uni.lodz.pl:8080/xmlui/handle/11089/17060?show=full

English Summary:

"After the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth was liquidated and disappeared from the map of Europe at the end of the 18th century, and was partitioned by Russia, Prussia, and Austria, Polish activists of the independence movements never consented to the fact and continued to work for the revival of the Polish state. One of the issues pondered about was that of the future boundaries of this state. Initially, the issue was not complicated at all, since it was commonly held that the sole just solution would be the return to the historical boundaries of 1772. In the later period, the awareness arose that this option cannot be realised. This was not only the consequence of the stable and disadvantageous for Poland geopolitical situation in Europe, but also of the ethnic diversification of the territory of the former Commonwealth. That is why various concepts started to appear, concerning the future boundaries of Poland, considering the historical, geopolitical, strategic, and ethnic conditioning. These concepts were primarily the visions of individual scholars or activists, but often they did represent definite ideological and political orientations. The article presents and comments upon some of these designs. Those more original in substantive terms, and containing an interesting cartographic illustration, were selected for presentation. Thusthe article treats the concepts authored by: Oskar Żebrowski, Stanisław Tomaszewski, Aleksander Janowski, Czesław Jankowski, Włodzimierz Wakar, Wiktor Skarga-Dobrowolski, and J�zef Jask�lski. These concepts, postulating the shape of boundaries of Poland, differed significantly as to the general territorial reach of the country and the shapes of its boundaries. Some of them were of clear maximalist character, while other ones were more moderate, and so had higher chances of implementation. The two last proposals for the boundaries of Poland, presented in the article, were already the official documents. The first of those two represented the position of the Polish National Committee, which was active in Lausanne in the years 1917�1918. The last concept of the boundary of Poland, shown in the article, was the official stance of the authorities of the newly re-established Polish state, which was presented at the Peace Conference in Paris in 1919. This concept was developed by Roman Dmowski, who headed Polish delegation at this conference. At the end of the article this most important design, prepared for the Versailles conference, is compared to the actual course of boundaries of the Polish state as it re-emerged after the First World War."

PDF download link:

http://cejsh.icm.edu.pl/cejsh/element/bwmeta1.element.hdl_11089_17060/c/2-009_035-Eberhardt.pdf

This one shows by far the largest area, "Shape of Poland within its Natural Borders", from 1847:

DeqTurn.jpg


^^^
The area in the west around Poznań-Gniezno called "Kolebka Polan�w" = "Cradle of Poles".
Please stop! Did you noticed that people post here geopolitical-statistical maps to interest others in discussions? Do you think anybody here but you is interested in some polish megaloman from the past who dreamed about biggest Poland ever? Screw the Lithuanians, Ukrainians, Moldovans and few others. Long live polish empire.
Maybe you look at this map with pride and joy and you want to share this happy feeling with others? (wrong thread anyway) Believe me, most people here look with disbelief and horror on your nationalistic fantasies. You are scaring people and making enemies. If this is your goal, then congratulations.
 
Ukrainians are already screwing themselves better than anyone else could. Also, the Ukrainian Empire* made ethnic Russian minority in Ukraine unhappy (Crimea, Donbass). Same in Moldova (Russians in Transnistria). Do you think that ethnic Russians in Ukraine have the right of self-determination, or no?

*The largest country fully in Europe which includes many historically, and even currently, Non-Ukrainian lands.

Screw the Lithuanians

American experts advised that Poland-Lithuania should be one country again, like before the Partitions:

https://archive.org/stream/MyDiaryA...ryAtConferenceOfParis-Vol4#page/n239/mode/2up

Long live polish empire.

I just posted that map as a fun curiosity, not because I really believe we should have these borders.

But since you are so paranoid, neurotic and over-reacting every time I post anything. Here we go: :LOL:

Where is the Fatherland of a Pole?
Is it Wielkopolska? Is it Podolia?
Oh no, no, no!
Our Fatherland must be bigger!


Poland was the only country of the victorious Allied coalition in WW2, which ended the war with smaller territory than at the beginning of the war:

Polish territory in 1939 - 390,000 km2
Polish territory in 1945 - 312,000 km2 (decline by 78,000 km2, or to 80% of pre-war size)

^^^ How come that a country which was, theoretically, among the victors, lost territory?

Ukrainians still celebrate Bandera and Nazi Ukrainian SS Units - this was in April 2018:


^^^
The current crisis in Ukraine is their own fault, they traded Poles for Russian separatists:

9LMM7iD.png
 
This thread is not going to turn into a safe haven for jingoistic propaganda or the same old same old pigmentation obsessions, as per another post upthread.

I opened it; I'll close it.
 
Harm to children by family structure:

3pTbPOW.png
[/IMG]

If I've thought it once I've thought it thousands of times: if your marriage breaks up, DON'T bring another man into the house until your children are grown.
 
Current support for autocratic rule. It's rather disheartening.

aE4SpG0.png
[/IMG]
 
Expenditure on education in Europe as percent of GDP:
3prd0Gf.png
[/IMG]



Shame on Italy, and it hurts me to say that. Natural gifts aren't enough; you have to nurture them.
 
Iberian land use c.1500
fpPUz0Z.png
[/IMG]

Given how much olive oil Spain produces today, surely that has changed?
 
Well, if they're not lying, this is heartening, although I'd like to see WHICH books they read.:)

qpzNzmm.png
[/IMG]

The only print books I read are things like texts or histories. For fiction I use e books.

NPjgLMq.png
[/IMG]

This is for men. Why the skew in eastern Europe? Cigarettes? (Italians and the French smoke a lot too, though) Drink? Food? Genetics?

The differences in western Europe are small: 81 for Germany versus 83 for Italians. Women are even longer lived. That's why I had so many great aunts in their mid 90's when they died. I doubt I'll make it that long.

BWEExRy.png
[/IMG]

Good grief! Why are so many Brits involvent in their prime years? As for gender imbalance, it's easy: divorced women with children.
 
I've been trying to learn the difference.

uu3qp0o.png

That's a really nice site. I took a very basic wine course years ago, but I forgot what little I learned. :)

Looking at the chart, I definitely prefer dryer wines. By the sixth from the left on the red wines it's getting too sweet for me. For the white wines I like them dryer yet.

Of course, it depends what you're eating. If you're a Silicon Valley type, you could have Barolo one night with chicken, and Brunello di Montalcino the next night with beef.

That isn't to say I don't like my vin santo with some cantuccini after a meal, but a little goes a long way.
 
That's a really nice site. I took a very basic wine course years ago, but I forgot what little I learned. :)

Looking at the chart, I definitely prefer dryer wines. By the sixth from the left on the red wines it's getting too sweet for me. For the white wines I like them dryer yet.

Of course, it depends what you're eating. If you're a Silicon Valley type, you could have Barolo one night with chicken, and Brunello di Montalcino the next night with beef.

That isn't to say I don't like my vin santo with some cantuccini after a meal, but a little goes a long way.

I also prefer to drink the dryer wines for both red and white. We're doing this wine tasting package that comes in a box of vials each month. I tried the same wine, from three different years. the taste changed significantly from one year to another. Though the starkest transition was from the first year to the second. It had gotten significantly better tasting. It initially tasted chalky, but then became much smoother.
 
GZl1WBn.png
[/IMG]

This map explains a lot of why I have to close threads on this site. :)

I certainly don't want to tell Pew their Business, but it's not about religion really. Most Italians, for example, couldn't care less. Again, why are Spain and Portugal so different?

EM9eFik.png
[/IMG]

2bxoMGy.png
[/IMG]
 

I can theorise that in the Balkans, due to the romanticism of the fights against the Ottomans and being self-perceived as protectorates of Christendom, the national identity is strongly intertwined with religion (which isn't really spiritual in this part Europe, but rather exists only on paper as to preserve the tradition).

That also spills over into views of cultural superiority (e.g. the traditional us vs. the decadent them).
 
Number of deaths in WW2 as percentage of pre-war population. Also pay attention to the pie graph. There's no comparison between the conduct of the Western Allies and the Nazis.

How many of those Russian and eastern European deaths were Jews, I wonder, how many killed in civil wars of one type or another, and how many are the responsibility of Stalin-purging all his best generals, demoralization caused by the political commissars, starvation partly caused poor pre-war policies, lack of equipment. What a monster.

3LpLcLs.png
[/IMG]
 
How many of those Russian and eastern European deaths were Jews, I wonder, how many killed in civil wars of one type or another, and how many are the responsibility of Stalin-purging all his best generals, demoralization caused by the political commissars, starvation partly caused poor pre-war policies, lack of equipment. What a monster.

Try "Bloodlands" by Timothy Snyder for answers. I won't spoil.
 
Try "Bloodlands" by Timothy Snyder for answers. I won't spoil.


Thanks Jarjar. After reading the synopsis and some reviews I borrowed a digital version from my library. If it's really good I'll buy a used copy for my library.

I don't know how I missed it. That period of European history is sort of my "thing". Keep them coming. :)
 

This thread has been viewed 86147 times.

Back
Top