Immigration Is dialogue between Europe and Latin America useful?

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^ lynx ^

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Is dialogue between Europe and Latin America useful?




This debate over the current situation and future relations between Europe and Latin America, which took place last 23 of January, coincided with the launch of a new book of the same title. It was coordinated by Casa Am?rica, FRIDE, Fundaci?n Carolina and ICEI and co-financed by the Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation (AECID).
The first point of reflection was the usefulness of political dialogue between the two regions. Although the panellists underlined the importance of political dialogue, which was institutionalised in the 1980s, they also affirmed that it was necessary to reactivate this communication and achieve concrete results.

Taking into account the reduced demographic weight of Latin America and the European Union in the world, an alliance between the two with regard to common interests (the environment, democracy, peace), would boost their global influence. In this sense, and in the run-up to the V Latin America, the Caribbean and the European Union Summit, to be held in Lima in May, the panellists backed the book?s recommendation that the agenda should focus on a few concrete areas of mutual interest.

With regard to the format of dialogue, the existence of ten inter-regional fora, which demonstrates the complexity of Latin American integration, was emphasised. The current centrifugal tendency in the region has resulted in a ?crisis of inter-regionalism?, according to ICEI's Cooperation and Development department Director Jos? Antonio Sanahuja, which is reflected in the difficulties currently bedevilling association agreement negotiations in both MERCOSUR and the Andean Community.

On the other hand, it was also pointed out the EU has already signed agreements with two bilateral partners: Chile and Mexico. In 2007 it likewise granted Brazil the status of ?strategic partner?. Although policies of exclusion do not seem to be on the agenda, it is not clear whether the EU will continue to pursue an inter-regional approach or instead give preference to bilateralism.



With the latter option in mind, Albert Navarro, Spanish Secretary of State for the European Union, suggested it would be legitimate for the EU to sign association agreements with Colombia and Peru if progress is not made in negotiations with CAN, including Ecuador and Bolivia. Mr Sanahuja meanwhile argued that, in order to be seen as a credible actor on the international stage, Europe should continue supporting the processes of Latin American integration as a prerequisite to inter-regionalism.
Taking a more comparative standpoint, FRIDE researcher Susanne Gratius underlined that despite the ongoing deficits, the lack of inter-state conflicts demonstrates that Latin America is still the region where democracy and integration have worked best as formulas for peace.

FRIDE Director General Pierre Schori then added that political dialogue should be an instrument to reduce poverty and inequality first and foremost, and that Latin America remained the most unjust region of the world. Recalling the words of OAS Secretary General Jos? Miguel Insulza, ?poverty is of colour and is female?, and that 40 percent of the population of Latin America lives in poverty and 20 percent in extreme poverty, Mr Schori said it was positive that the continent?s leaders included a female president (Chile), a union leader (Brazil) and a member of the indigenous community (Bolivia).



He went on to argue that greater social cohesion was a necessary condition for peace, democracy and development, however. Quoting Sergio Bitar, who said that Latin America ?cannot be Nordic in social issues and African in taxation?, he identified the low levels of state fundraising as a principal challenge. In his judgment, social inequality was intrinsically linked to the high levels of violence that make Latin America the most dangerous part of the world.


The major challenges facing Latin America, he argued, were poverty, violence and weak democracies. He said it would be vital to make good use of the economic boom in order to avert a political bang. In closing, Mr Schori reemphasised some of the recommendations from the book, including the idea of creating a centre for the prevention of inter-regional conflicts and a European-Latin America initiative for Haiti.


Source: FRIDE.
 
Another interesting article from the same source:

The European Union and South American Populism

By Susanne Gratius

The democratic compromise is not only the most important "acquis" of political dialogue between Latin America and the EU, but also the common ground for their strategic partnership.

Although both regions affirm in every occasion that they share the same values, the resurgence of populism in Latin America, particularly in Bolivia, Ecuador and Venezuela increases the gap between both partners.


Recent declarations of Hugo Ch?vez to "distance from Spain" due to Spanish criticism on the closure of Radio Caracas Television (RCTV), or the denial of Evo Morales to sign a free trade agreement between the Andean Community and the EU are clear signs for a deteriorating relationship with the EU.

This comment examines the impact of populism in European Union's policy towards South America and concludes with a series of policy recommendations.

Link: FRIDE.

A full version of the article can be found in PDF here: LINK
 
Now what is your opinion ? As a Spaniard, how much do you care about other Spanish-speaking countries that were once part of the Spanish Empire ? How close do you feel to them ? Do you think that your country should do more to strengthen relations between Spain and its former colonies, or on the contrary do you feel Spain should redirect its international relations with other parts of the world instead ?
 
Now what is your opinion ?

Creo que mientras gran cantidad (no todos) de paises latino americanos sigan teniendo sistemas educativos deficientes y grandes dosis de patrioterismo entre su poblacion (lo cual los hace mas volubles y manipulables ante su clase politica y periodistica) es una perdida de tiempo intentar encarar relaciones diplomaticas con ellos como lo hacemos con Norteamerica o pasies de Asia y Oceania.

As a Spaniard, how much do you care about other Spanish-speaking countries that were once part of the Spanish Empire ?

Me interesa este tema porque creo que mi pais deberia cambiar su politica hacia ellos, no porque me interese mas lo que pasa en esa parte del mundo que lo que pueda suceder fuera de Latino America.

How close do you feel to them ?

Muy poco. Si no fuera por el idioma (a la mayoria, no a todos) los veria como a un pueblo exotico, como veo por ejemplo a pueblos del lejano oriente.

Do you think that your country should do more to strengthen relations between Spain and its former colonies, or on the contrary do you feel Spain should redirect its international relations with other parts of the world instead ?

Por lo que te he dicho hasta ahora, creo que ya te puedes figurar mi respuesta. Intentar estrechar lazos con ellos solo nos ha servido para que algun que otro lider de poca catadura moral (como Chavez) nos utilice como chivo expiatorio (ya sabes, somos la antigua y malvada metropoli)... y en algunos casos para alimentar a politicos corruptos. Un ejemplo, en 2007 hubo un fuerte terremoto en Peru, que dejo destruida la ciudad de Pisco y a muchas personas sin hogar, Espa?a mando cuantiosa ayuda economica para ayudar a reconstruir el lugar... a dia de hoy, dicha localidad sigue casi igual porque el dinero fue a para a los bolsillos de los politicos locales. Deprimente.


Saludos.
 
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Now what is your opinion ? As a Spaniard, how much do you care about other Spanish-speaking countries that were once part of the Spanish Empire ?
The same I care for african or asian countries. I want them to succeed obviously.


How close do you feel to them ?
We spaniards do not feel any relationship with them.
Culturally, ethnically, historically, economically, etc... we have nothing to do with them.
Like ^Lynx^ says, they are exotic to us. And I think they feel the same about us, except maybe Argentina, which is closer to Europe ethnically/culturaly.

We are much closer to Italy, France, Portugal, Andorra, etc.. than spanish-speaking countries. Also remember in Spain not everybody speaks spanish. I myself speak Catalan.


Do you think that your country should do more to strengthen relations between Spain and its former colonies, or on the contrary do you feel Spain should redirect its international relations with other parts of the world instead ?
The relations with South America are based mostly on the Spanish companies there (Spanish Oil company Repsol, Banking, etc).
 
I suggest Latin America should continue to try to communicate with Europe, but this could not be done through a so immature country as Spain facing so much problems of identity.

Really, I just discoverd this section of the forum, and look (what a surprise!) that @Lynx have used it to talk trash about Latin America, and opening themes about "Brazilian prostitutes" and the like.

Now, Latin America has 500+ Million inhabitants (as much as Europe) and possesses the most important reserves of energy and raw materials in the world. Just Venezuela has as much oil reserves as Russia or Saudi Arabia, and as we speak, Latin America is a very important market of European Products and vice-versa.

I am confident that Europe will continue to persue dialog with Latin America and will not allow its long term interest to be affected by the Spanish identity crisis.

It is true that ideologically, Latin America has moved a lot to the left, while Europe has moved in the last years to the right. Still left to be seen if importants diplomatic incidents will be produced as result of that.

Still, trade between the continents continue to grow. And it willl continue to be so in the future,... as long as Europe do not pretend that we should commerce just with the "West" and not with important patners like Russia, China or Iran... then there will be conflicts, and rightly so.

But besides that, it is infantile that Spain's identity crisis causes much damage to the dialog and commerce between two big continents.

Regards.

++++++++++++++++++

P.S.

Look just 6-9 moths ago, or so, Spain secret service attempted to coordinate a plot against Fidel Castro in Cuba... but it was discovered very early, and much information about Spains secrets in many areas were siphoned by Cuban agents. Spain was completedly embarrased, completely doblegated by the professionalism of Cuban security.

Why there has to be incidents like that? Just because Spain think that it could come here and do and undo as it pleases... and when it can't, there is a brat, and she just think it could call Europe to boycott Latin America.

What an immature country, that doesn't know where it really belongs. Its a shame to look at.
 
We spaniards do not feel any relationship with them.
Culturally, ethnically, historically, economically, etc... we have nothing to do with them.
Like ^Lynx^ says, they are exotic to us. And I think they feel the same about us, except maybe Argentina, which is closer to Europe ethnically/culturaly.

Didn't I told you?

Still, we could do a lot of things with the rest of Europe, China and many other countries, while Spains recovers some sanity..

(if it ever does... )

What a shame. :ashamed2:
 
The European Union last year set a new record in trade with Latin America thanks to strong growth in two-way trade between the top trading partners in each region.

Total EU trade with Latin America reached 141.1 billion euro (approximately $177.2 billion) last year, a 18.0 percent increase from 2005, according to data from EU statistics agency Eurostat. EU exports grew by 14.9 percent to 62.8 billion euro, while imports from Latin America expanded by 20.6 percent to 78.3 billion euro.

Trade will likely continue to grow at strong rates, thanks to free trade negotiations underway between the EU and Central America and the Andean Community, experts say.

Relations with the EU will intensify," predicts Isaac Cohen, president of US-based consultancy Inverway. Cohen is a former official of the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America (ECLAC) who is advising Guatemala's Foreign Ministry on its negotiations with the EU.

European trade with Latin America will grow as a result of the growing interest among companies on each side of the Atlantic, as will European investment in the region, which is already growing significantly, Cohen points out.

Key European policy makers also are boosting their attention of Latin America. Last month, Benita Ferrero-Waldner, the European Commissioner for External Relations, visited Colombia, Guatemala and the Dominican Republic. Two months earlier - just as U.S. President George W. Bush was visiting Latin America - German president Horst Köhler visited Brazil, Colombia and Paraguay. And in January, relations between Germany and Mexico were boosted when Mexican president Felipe Calderon traveled to Berlin for meetings with German Chancellor Andrea Merkel.

Latin America's trade with the EU last year grew stronger than its trade with the United States, which grew by 14.3 percent. However, the EU still lags the United States when it comes to trade with Latin America. Its trade represents a third of total U.S.-Latin America trade.

LATIN AMERICA: VENEZUELA AND CHILE GROW MOST

Venezuela saw the strongest growth in Latin America in trade with the EU last year in percentage terms (44.8 percent), while Chile grew most in real terms (4.42 billion euros), according to a Latin Business Chronicle analysis of Eurostat data.


El Salvador and Haiti followed Venezuela in terms of percentage growth, with 44.1 percent 42.9 percent, respectively. The top five winners also includes Uruguay and Peru. Measured in real terms, Chile was followed by Brazil (up 4.39 billion euros), Mexico (3.6 billion euros) and Venezuela (2.9 billion euros).

However, when it comes to Latin American exports, Uruguay made the most progress. Its exports to the EU grew by 79.0 percent last year. Venezuela followed, with 61.6 percent. Other export growth winners include Chile (50.7 percent), Peru (46.3 percent) and the Dominican Republic (39.6 percent). Measured in real terms, Chile again is the winner - with a net increase of 4.1 billion euros. Brazil follows (2.7 billion euros), with Venezuela, Mexico and Peru rounding out the top five growth winners.


Thanks to the strong growth, Chile replaced Mexico as the second-largest Latin American exporter to the EU last year, our analysis shows. Chile's exports totaled $12.1 billion versus $10.6 billion from Mexico.


However, Brazil still is the undisputed exporter to the EU. Its exports reached 26.2 billion, an increase of 11.7 percent from 2005. Argentina and Venezuela are also among the top five Latin American exporters to the EU.


But Mexico imports more from the EU than Brazil, making it the top EU market in Latin America. Last year, EU exports to Mexico reached 19.0 billion euro, an increase of 13.2 percent from 2005. Brazil's imports of EU products reached 17.7 billion euro, which was 10.3 percent more than it bought in 2005. Other leading importers from the EU are Argentina, Chile and Venezuela.


Brazil is also the top EU trade partner in Latin America. Last year, its trade with the EU reached 43.9 billion euro, an increase of 11.1 percent from 2005. Mexico followed, with 29.6 billion euro in trade, an increase of 13.9 percent. Chile, Argentina and Venezuela round out the top five trade partners.

The EU's top trading partner in Central America is Costa Rica. EU trade with that country grew by 6.0 percent to 4.1 billion last year. The top EU trade partner in the Andean Community is Colombia. EU trade with that country grew by 10.0 percent to 6.3 billion last year.


STRONGEST DECLINES

Despite the strong growth in EU trade with Latin America, there were some declines and less-impressive results. Honduras saw its trade with the EU fall by 1.3 percent, the only Latin American country to note a decline. Meanwhile, countries like Ecuador and Nicaragua saw the weakest growth - 2.6 percent and 2.8 percent, respectively - in Latin America.

Honduras was one of only two Latin American countries to post a decline in imports from the EU last year. The other was Nicaragua. Honduras imports from the EU fell by 20.8 percent, while Nicaraguan bought 11.4 percent less goods from the EU last year than in 2005.

In terms of exports to the EU, El Salvador and Costa Rica were the only Latin American that posted declines - 21.1 percent and 1.4 percent, respectively. Other export losers include Cuba and Ecuador, which posted weak growth of only 2.0 percent and 2.5 percent, respectively.


THE EU: FINLAND AND GERMANY GROW MOST

Among the top 10 EU partners of Latin America, Finland posted the strongest increase in total trade in percentage terms (34.2 percent), followed by Portugal (27.6 percent) and Spain (19.7 percent). In real terms, Germany grew most - 5.0 billion euro. Spain followed, with an increase of 3.3 billion euro. Other growth winners include Italy, the Netherlands and France.


Portugal led the pack when it came to export growth in percentage terms - 42.4 percent, followed by the Netherlands (31.4 percent) and Finland (22.7 percent). In real terms, Germany posted the strongest increase (1.9 billion euro), followed by France, Spain and Italy.


When it comes to imports from Latin America, Finland saw the strongest percentage growth - 50. 0 percent, followed by Germany (31.0 percent) and Italy (25.4 percent). In real terms, Germany again posted the strongest growth (3.1 billion), followed by Spain (2.1 billion). Other growth winners in real terms include Italy, the Netherlands and France.


The strong growth in Finnish trade was due to imports doubling from countries ranging from Mexico and Colombia to Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Meanwhile, Finnish exports to Brazil nearly doubled.


Germany remains the undisputed top EU trading partner for Latin America. Its total trade with the region reached 31.4 billion last year, an increase of 19.2 percent over 2005. Spain came in second, with total trade reaching 19.9 billion last year, which was 19.7 percent more than the previous year. Italy came in third, replacing the Netherlands. Italy's trade with Latin America grew by 19.2 percent last year to 17.7 billion euro. Meanwhile, the Netherlands also saw growth, albeit at lower levels. Its trade with Latin America increased by 15.8 percent to 17.3 billion euro.


Germany's top export market in Latin America is Mexico, but its top provider in the region is Brazil. All in all, German trade with Brazil reached 10.8 billion euro last year, an increase of 9.7 percent from 2005. Germany's trade with Mexico reached 9.1 billion euro, an increase of 17.0 percent.

OUTLOOK

The EU and Central America recently agreed to start their first formal round of negotiations in September. However, Costa Rica has subsequently asked that talks start after the country holds its referendum on CAFTA, which is scheduled for September. Negotiations will likely take some 10 rounds over 12 to 18 months, Cohen predicts. But he is optimistic the result will be an agreement after that time.

"There is a very good possibility of an agreement," he says.

Unlike CAFTA, the EU association agreement will also include political and social criteria aimed at reducing corruption and boosting democracy. "The Europeans are not afraid of adding social elements to trade negotiations," Cohen points out.

The EU also is demanding a customs union in Central America, which will benefit the region, he points out.

Meanwhile, the EU is also looking at negotiations for an association agreement with the Andean Community, although that will likely take longer to reach than the one with Central America. The Andean Community is currently split between free-trade countries like Colombia and Peru on the one hand and anti-market countries like Bolivia and Ecuador on the other. However, they all have an interest in reaching an accord with the EU, Cohen argues.

"Bolivia and Ecuador are interested in increased cooperation with the EU, which will give them an incentive to reach an agreement with Colombia and Peru to negotiate," he says.

The EU has firmly insisted it will only negotiate with the Andean Community as a bloc, not individual countries.

While free trade agreements with Central America and the Andean Community will help boost EU trade with Latin America, the big prize is Mercosur. And any negotiations with that group is stalled as long as there is no global agreement on agriculture. If such an agreement is reached, though, the EU and Mercosur will likely move quickly on negotiations for a free trade agreement, Cohen predicts.


http://www.latinbusinesschronicle.com/app/article.aspx?id=1273
 
So now Spain has an identity crisis? :rolleyes:
Knowledgeable Spaniards are just trying to set the facts straight with respect to their LEGITIMATE heritage. Every ethnicity has the right to do that. Unfortunately, there are too many deranged, self-hating characters around spreading outrageous misinformation about any number of peoples now-a-days. Sick world...
 
So now Spain has an identity crisis? :rolleyes:
Knowledgeable Spaniards are just trying to set the facts straight with respect to their LEGITIMATE heritage. Every ethnicity has the right to do that. Unfortunately, there are too many deranged, self-hating characters around spreading outrageous misinformation about any number of peoples now-a-days. Sick world...

Look, man... :confused:

We are not to blame that Northern Europeans do not buy the Spaniards as Europeans of the same level.

In this thread, some Iberian said we Latin Americans are "completedly exotic", alien to them.

If Iberians in their desperation want to claim we are "little green men" to them... FINE, just FINE.... we could continue to make business with the Germans, the French, the Belgians, the Scandinavians... no problem.

Just don't think we (too) cannot put "things straight" here, as you say.

Regards.
 
I think that the EU-LatAm summit that is taking place right now, could be discussed in the frame of this post.

Regards.
 
Look, man... :confused:

We are not to blame that Northern Europeans do not buy the Spaniards as Europeans of the same level.

In this thread, some Iberian said we Latin Americans are "completedly exotic", alien to them.

If Iberians in their desperation want to claim we are "little green men" to them... FINE, just FINE.... we could continue to make business with the Germans, the French, the Belgians, the Scandinavians... no problem.

Just don't think we (too) cannot put "things straight" here, as you say.

Regards.

So explain the "things" you are setting "straight".

Spain is hardly shunning business with Latin America... :LOL:
 
Look, man... :confused:

We are not to blame that Northern Europeans do not buy the Spaniards as Europeans of the same level.
What level ?

In this thread, some Iberian said we Latin Americans are "completedly exotic", alien to them.

If Iberians in their desperation want to claim we are "little green men" to them... FINE, just FINE.... we could continue to make business with the Germans, the French, the Belgians, the Scandinavians... no problem.
And what has business anything to do with the fact that spaniards feel alien to Latin Americans and find them exotic ?? :confused: Im sure also Germans or Scandinavians don't feel any connection with Latin Americans aswell...
 
SiriousMichael2b, I am not the president of my country nor Wilhelm is. You perfectly know that (sadly) spanish politicians have a very different view on Latin America than me. Spain donates millions of euros year after year to your corrupt continent and this week Mr Zapatero have a meeting with Mr Calderon.

Keep ridiculously using North European people and building fantasy scenarios to try to humiliate us like we did(?) to you. And you can keep pretending to be swedish or scottish as well. :rolleyes: You're just showing your inferiority complex towards spaniards, you're only ridiculizing yourself not us. It's not our fault that you was born in a third-world country where people can't face their amerindian roots and pretend to be spaniards as much as posible.

Look just 6-9 moths ago, or so, Spain secret service attempted to coordinate a plot against Fidel Castro in Cuba...

What an imagination. :LOL: Sorry, but we are not Mexico aka Narcoland, where politicians and policemen work for narcos and drug dealers and not for the people, and when they try to work for the people they are shoot to death.

Cambria Red said:
So now Spain has an identity crisis? :rolleyes:

He's just pitifully trying to make spaniards look as ridiculous as him over and over again by building the same false scenario. It's getting boring already. :bored: Remember when he posted pics of mexican girls with amerindian traits and said that they looked like spanish girls??? Now that is identity crisis.

Greetings.
 
He's just pitifully trying to make spaniards look as ridiculous as him over and over again by building the same false scenario. It's getting boring already. :bored: Remember when he posted pics of mexican girls with amerindian traits and said that they looked like spanish girls??? Now that is identity crisis.

Greetings.[/QUOTE]

Quite pathetic. Self hatred is a horrible thing.
 
Is dialogue between Europe and Latin America useful?

In sumary, I think that every country in Europe and Latin America will and should decide with which other country they like to approach for diplomatic and commercial purposes.

If Spain don't want to have any dialog with Latin America... What can we say? It's very much free to do it.

Spain and Portugal cannot prevent that Latin America and Europe as whole entities have some mutualy beneficial contact.

Given the offensive racist and the air of supposed superiority that goes to your thread, I also have to say, that the World is Big, and if Spain (or anyone) don't want to speak or trade with us... there is Asia, Russia, Iran, etc... with which our trade and contacts are booming.

Spain certainly have some kind of leverage (not very great, though) with the most depraved goverments in the Region... say, Mexico and Columbia... and that kind of gouvermnts, by they very nature, cannot last forever.

Finally... Well, I don't know what you mean with the opening question of your thread.

If what you are suggesting is a total boycott or ban of Latin America by the part of Europe, and don't know how could you come to such ridiculous notion.

And all... just because your Spanish complexes of not being accepted as equal by noth Europeans, make you write a series of trashy topics in forums like this, and even conflictuate and being rude with Italians and Turks, that have nothing to do the realities of Spain.

What a shame.
 
I believe that developing trade corridors over the South American continent and deepening of trade relations between the EU and the countries of South America is of great importance, not only given the recovering economic state of the world.

I think that the development of the CAN and the Mercosur bloc into the USAN and it's single market after the European Union model is very encouraging in spite of allegations of protectionism to control the trade balance, and concerns over cheap agricultural products competing with the already subsidized agricultural market of Europe.

I do think that bilateral agreements should be avoided and that it is of great importance that the EU negotiate and make treaties with South America in the forums of regional organisations, supporting the creation of a South American single market and it's political institutions in development.

Although I need a deeper understanding of the progression of the South American project I think it seems as if it is coming a long with the visa and passport waiver of 2006 and present and proposed common institutions. I am hopeful of the future for it, even though I recognize the difficulties concerning among others Colombia and it's internal and international problems, and the ever present issues of deforestation, erosion and pollution all over Latin America.

I think that the development of democracy, welfare and society in South America is more exciting from a European perspective than that of of China - which has a long way to go in human rights, democracy and rule of law concerning more than the private sector of the economy. It is with interest I see Dilma Rousseff become president of Brazil, noting the many South American women leader of past and present.

Brazil is a regional leader and one of the BRIC countries. From a strict economic aspect, Chinese FDI has soured and an increasing part of the export of South America's vast resources go to China, feeding the immense growth - foremost of Brazil who overtook Russia in economic size in 2009 - which is great, but Europe has to be as present in South America as the US and China, and being so as a union. There is opposition with the EU-Mercosur trade talks - with France being very vocal - regarding opening up the agricultural sector for competition from South America with Brazil being one of the greatest agricultural producers in the world. As FTAs between EU and the regional organisations will increase trade, there have been concerns as well that the South American export to Europe will enjoy lax control and evade requirement of European standards on production and handling.

I think that most of us have some sort of opinion on the CAP in the EU, and as it has been criticized and capped, I think one can only speculate what will happen with the planned further lowering of it. I do think however, that the vocal opposition of EU-Mercosur treaty talks is just as much a European protectionism as we have accused countries of the South America of. I think that the way forward is a deeper relation on every level with the emerging USAN, and I think we have seen how the EU has made a great impact as a role model in Latin America already, including the San José Dialogue and the EU-Central American relations; another regional cooperation of great interest.
 
He's just pitifully trying to make spaniards look as ridiculous as him over and over again by building the same false scenario. It's getting boring already. :bored: Remember when he posted pics of mexican girls with amerindian traits and said that they looked like spanish girls??? Now that is identity crisis.

Greetings.

Quite pathetic. Self hatred is a horrible thing.[/QUOTE]

That's quite the norm in latin america.
 
BBC Bews
“Brazil is not Bolsonaro” and Mercosur-EU agreement will bring control and collaboration over the Amazon, says European Parliament rapporteur

The country has become a constant target of international criticism that especially targets the federal government's environmental management.

Jordi Cañas: “from Europe, we have a very wrong perspective on the reality of the countries, especially from Latin America. Very loaded with prejudices, stereotyped information, and with a lack of in-depth information about the great transformations experienced by these countries in recent decades.We have to learn to relate with respect and friendship and in a balanced way, between equals, because these countries have earned this respect. If we want to contribute, we have to do like this: giving them the respect they deserve, knowing your reality, and never confusing governments with countries, let alone with its citizens. We have to have a broader and more respectful view.”

https://ampost.com.br/en/2020/07/br...e-amazonia-diz-relator-do-parlamento-europeu/



 
Out of curiosity why was the European settlement of North America so much different to that of Latin America?
 

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