Politics Pro-EU or Anti-EU

We are in a position now where Germany are basically proposing that other euro zone countries get a say in each others fiscal policy.

Or in other words Germany gets to hold the euro zone purse strings.

People are talking about the bail-outs as a disaster but they are loans and people make money from loans.

Germany has only strengthened it grip over western europe with the crisis, i think its federalisation via the back door.
 
It seems to me, from afar, that Norway has been fine without being in the EU. Certainly, the EU would benefit to have another stable country like Norway in its midst. But would Norway have a net benefit? It seems that they get most of their benefit from just being in the EEA.

We are doing pretty fine now which can to a huge degree be credited to our oil export which has made us a very rich country and thus giving us a lot of money to invest in infrastructure, education, research to create economic growth and ensure everyone a high standard of living.

The EU is our biggest trade partner where about 80% of our exports goes and a EU-membership is a give and take thing, we would have to give alot, but in the long run I think we would benefit from it economicly even though we would have to cash up big time right now.

We would have to give up alot of sovereignty as a EU-member though like giving up our currency and adopt the €uro. Adopting the euro would most likely benefit our export industry that has to pay fees to exchange to th euro now. It would also mean lower inflation and lower prices on alot of goods like food which means we could cut wages and thus make our export industry more competative.But it would also mean the end of the norwegian krone and a loss of our most important tool to controll our inflation, interest rate and employment politics.

So to summon up: would Norway have a net benefit? Economicly I think so. Would it benefit our sovereignty? Not at all and this is why I'm undecided whether Norway should join the EU or not.
 
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I agree with everything in "Very pro-EU", but I am either slightly or mildly because I think EU's policies towards workers are shameful. I am proponent of democratic socialism and I want to see a truly free Europe without any oppressive ideologies - authoritarian "communism", fascism, capitalism. Capitalism dehumanizes and treats a human being only as a source of profit, without any honour and dignity.
 
I agree with everything in "Very pro-EU", but I am either slightly or mildly because I think EU's policies towards workers are shameful. I am proponent of democratic socialism and I want to see a truly free Europe without any oppressive ideologies - authoritarian "communism", fascism, capitalism. Capitalism dehumanizes and treats a human being only as a source of profit, without any honour and dignity.

i am 100% anti-Eu IF you retain nations in the EU.

If you want to have nations in the EU , then do not have euro money ...all MUST have there own currency.
Any other system which has nations does not work, as was stated in the 1990s by economists.
 
For EU wholehearted. Every small country is for the EU. It gives them security.
 
i am 100% anti-Eu IF you retain nations in the EU.

If you want to have nations in the EU , then do not have euro money ...all MUST have there own currency.
Any other system which has nations does not work, as was stated in the 1990s by economists.

That's not the EU. You're talking about the eurozone - a separate institution from the EU.
 
That's not the EU. You're talking about the eurozone - a separate institution from the EU.

? what?....that my opinion on how it should work regardless of what it is
 
I'm for EU, and suppose my country will become the member of EU. But EU must change and central authorities should have more power. In fact, if the EU wants to be strong it must sooner or later become a federation with all the powers of the federation (finance, population, army etc.).
 
Im very anti-EU and I would like to get ouf it badly, and also get back to our national money (the Peseta). To hell with the EU.
 
slightly pro, there is some necessity, but they should keep it simple, and there should be less politics and politicians in general (not only in the EU)
 
I voted Mildly Pro-EU but I think I'm somewhere between there and Very Pro-EU. I would like to see more smart integration that benefits all countries. While I believe EU expansion is good I think evaluating the potential ramifications needs to be more thought out. Also would like to see an end to NATO and a true independent EU military.
 
I am anti EU for several reasons.
1)I dont want single currency
2)I believe Europe is made of several nations each with unique people, culture, etc.
3)I dont like the idea of one supranational union.
4)Open borders and immigration are major problems.
5)Some countries benefit, others lose from it.
6)The current EU politics is not democratic.
 
I am anti EU for several reasons.
1)I dont want single currency
2)I believe Europe is made of several nations each with unique people, culture, etc.
3)I dont like the idea of one supranational union.
4)Open borders and immigration are major problems.
5)Some countries benefit, others lose from it.
Can we say the same about Canada and USA?
 
I think the EU should represent a block of countries with geographic adjacency, an at least partially shared common history and origins, and common interests in the global scenario. But no "european commission" (what is its REAL role?), no bureaucratic impositions, and if it doesn't work properly, as it is now, no common currency. There could be a common currency for the international commercial transactions, and national currencies (somehow "linked" together as it was before the euro). National curriencies worked better because they were real expressions of their own territories.
Let the council of the european governments (democratically elected), the only functional legislative body of the Union. The commission could exist only in order to help the governments council routine.
 
Personally I really find the common currency great easy to compare and no hustle to exchange. I appreciated more the common euro currency when visiting Copenhagen from Malmo (that means Sweden to Denmark Just 30 minutes over the Oresund bridge ) both in the EU but not in the EuroZone, so both have their own different currency and have to change money in each place. besides the fact that you have to keep converting every time just to know how much something costs. Nostalgic for local currencies yes, Practical? not too sure.
 
Personally I really find the common currency great easy to compare and no hustle to exchange. I appreciated more the common euro currency when visiting Copenhagen from Malmo (that means Sweden to Denmark Just 30 minutes over the Oresund bridge ) both in the EU but not in the EuroZone, so both have their own different currency and have to change money in each place. besides the fact that you have to keep converting every time just to know how much something costs. Nostalgic for local currencies yes, Practical? not too sure.

I don't think it's a question of nostalgia, Maleth, or at least it shouldn't be the prime consideration, obviously. In my opinion, unless the southern European countries get rid of the Euro they'll continue to struggle economically. I also don't see how Italy, in particular, is benefiting from it or the EU in general, which is my primary focus, or at least I don't think the benefits outweigh the negatives as far as the current system is concerned. Just how has the EU helped Italy with the problems resulting from all the refugees of one sort or another that wash up on her shores? Plus, she is already strangled by regulations. How would more regulations, and especially those propagated by a bunch of bureaucrats with no allegiance to her solve any of her problems? As presently constituted, the decisions will be made by other countries to their benefit, not Italy's, in my opinion.

Ed. I almost wish I hadn't posted. :) I spent more than enough time this summer in rancorous arguments about the EU and politics and economics in general. It's not for nothing that some people say never discuss politics or religion. I almost came to blows with my nearest and dearest this summer (well, that's an exaggeration, but you know what I mean, I'm sure. :grin:), and it ended with some family members telling me to keep my mouth shut until I return and pay my taxes there, instead of just alighting for visits a couple of months a year. :sad-2:
 
I don't think it's a question of nostalgia, Maleth, or at least it shouldn't be the prime consideration, obviously. In my opinion, unless the southern European countries get rid of the Euro they'll continue to struggle economically. I also don't see how Italy, in particular, is benefiting from it or the EU in general, which is my primary focus, or at least I don't think the benefits outweigh the negatives as far as the current system is concerned. Just how has the EU helped Italy with the problems resulting from all the refugees of one sort or another that wash up on her shores? Plus, she is already strangled by regulations. How would more regulations, and especially those propagated by a bunch of bureaucrats with no allegiance to her solve any of her problems? As presently constituted, the decisions will be made by other countries to their benefit, not Italy's, in my opinion.

I admit I am not much of an economist and I am not too sure why the Euro can be beneficial for the economy except for the basic arguments of more transparency in how much something costs in one country and knowing who is making the best deal without the risk of getting fractured currency fluctuations. Somehow it has facilitated travel and moving around. Also its the exchange costs involved, but regardless of that I really do not know much more. My comment is more in regards to the days of my childhood when we had to regularly exchange currency to go anywhere and now it feels like a little luxury going (business or leisure) to Eurozone countries. I remember feeling annoyed changing money going to Sweden, then changing Money again to go to Denmark, then changing money again to enter back in Sweden and changing money again to come back to Malta. I kept saying, is it really necessary? :useless: :) On the other hand countries out of the Eurozone seem to be doing good if not better, but then deep down I feel they would do even better (and not the other way round) if they had the Euro. I think or believe there are other factors rather then the Euro in regards to economy performance. Just my opinion.

In regards to refugees I believe it has been the biggest negative effect even on Malta with a population of just over 400,000 to cater for such an influx of refugees and being told by the Beurocrats in Brussels (as you put it) that once they enter here its our problem and nobody else!. It was only the US who was willing to take a few hundreds. None of them intended to come to Malta and just were directed here by bad weather. The EU handed out some extra money as a one time handout and mostly to upgrade the detention centres with better facilities!. One has to see the repercussions of such an influx on such a small population.


Ed. I almost wish I hadn't posted. :) I spent more than enough time this summer in rancorous arguments about the EU and politics and economics in general. It's not for nothing that some people say never discuss politics or religion. I almost came to blows with my nearest and dearest this summer (well, that's an exaggeration, but you know what I mean, I'm sure. :grin:), and it ended with some family members telling me to keep my mouth shut until I return and pay my taxes there

:shocked:....Very familiar with the situation :grin:

instead of just alighting for visits a couple of months a year. :sad-2:

couple of months a year is really frequent Angela. Do not forget your little side trip south next time :)
 
Europe is not the Europe of 50's, just after the war, neither the Europe of 70's 80's with the big dreaming politicians, who build EU,

2015 is a catalytic year, starting from 22/01/2015 when Dragi will anounce the ECB reports
 
Europe is not the Europe of 50's, just after the war, neither the Europe of 70's 80's with the big dreaming politicians, who build EU,

2015 is a catalytic year, starting from 22/01/2015 when Dragi will anounce the ECB reports


besides
it is another thing
1)the EEC
2) the EU
3) the Fiscal union (ECB Eurozone,)

it is other thing
Dublin treaty
Lisbon treaty
Maas..trich (difficult orthography) treaty
etc etc


some countries today are still in the status of EEC
, avoiding the treaties of EU
 

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