Professor Reich on Yamnaya and Population Turnover in Europe

Where they tested for Z93 ?

The paper is from 2010, but the new data (which says that they were not Z93) is from 2014, and has not yet been published:

Xiaohe R1a1a more likely originate from Europe because of it not belonging to R1a1a-Z93 branch (our recently unpublished data)

The comment was made (in 2014) by one of authors of that 2010 paper - Hui Zhou. Maybe he will publish this new data soon ???
 
The paper is from 2010, but the new data (which says that they were not Z93) is from 2014, and has not yet been published:



The comment was made (in 2014) by one of authors of that 2010 paper - Hui Zhou. Maybe he will publish this new data soon ???

ok , that is new
I'd like to see the paper when it'll be published - for what snps did they test ?
any idea whether there is any R1a1a - xZ93 in present Chinese/Mongolian/eastern Siberian left ?
 
By the way:

R1a1a1b1a2-Z280 from Late Bronze Age East Germany, Halberstadt, Lusatian Culture. 1113 -1021 BCE

So we have Balto-Slavic Y-DNA in Lusatian Culture:

http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_R1a_Y-DNA.shtml

R1a-Z280 is also an Balto-Slavic marker, found all over central and Eastern Europe, with a western limit running from East to south-west Germany and to Northeast Italy. It can be divided in many clusters: East Slavic, Baltic, Pomeranian, Polish, Carpathian, East-Alpine, Czechoslovak, and so on.

Moreover, it was found in the westernmost peripheries:

Lusatian_Culture.png
 
BTW:

1) All of modern R1a M417 (which is 99% of total R1a in the world today) is descended from ONE SINGLE MALE who lived 4800 - 6800 years ago.

2) All of modern I1 M253 (which is also great majority of I1 in the world) is descended from ONE SINGLE MALE who lived around 5000 years ago.

And ancestor of all R1a M417 lived in Karelia 7500 - 7000 years ago, while ancestor of all I1 M253 lived in Hungary 7000 years ago.

===============================

Is most of R1b among the Basques descended from that Pre-Indo-European Neolithic Spanish R1b ???

Check:

I0410 (Spain_EN)
We determined that this individual belonged to haplogroup R1b1 (M415:9170545C→A), with upstream haplogroup R1b (M343:2887824C→A) also supported. However, the individual was ancestral for R1b1a1 (M478:23444054T→C), R1b1a2 (PF6399:2668456C→T, L265:8149348A→G, L150.1:10008791C→T and M269:22739367T→C), R1b1c2 (V35:6812012T→A), and R1b1c3 (V69:18099054C→T), and could thus be designated R1b1*(xR1b1a1, R1b1a2, R1b1c2, R1b1c3). The occurrence of a basal form of haplogroup R1b1 in both western Europe and R1b1a in eastern Europe (I0124 hunter-gatherer from Samara) complicates the interpretation of the origin of this lineage. We are not aware of any other western European R1b lineages reported in the literature before the Bell Beaker period (ref. 2 and this study). It is possible that either (i) the Early Neolithic Spanish individual was a descendant of a Neolithic migrant from the Near East that introduced this lineage to western Europe, or (ii) there was a very sparse distribution of haplogroup R1b in [Western] European hunter-gatherers and early farmers, so the lack of its detection in the published literature may reflect its occurrence at very low frequency. The occurrence of a basal form of R1b1 in western Europe logically raises the possibility that presentday western Europeans (who belong predominantly to haplogroup R1b1a2-M269) may trace their origin to early Neolithic farmers of western Europe. However, we think this is not likely given the existence of R1b1a2-M269 not only in western Europe but also in the Near East; such a distribution implies migrations of M269 males from western Europe to the Near East which do not seem archaeologically plausible. We prefer the explanation that R-M269 originated in the eastern end of its distribution, given its first appearance in the Yamnaya males (below) and in the Near East17.

And also:

http://eurogenes.blogspot.com/

Interestingly, all seven of the Yamnaya males sampled by Haak et al., mostly from the Samara Valley on the Ural steppe, belong to R1b-M269, the most common subclade of R1b today. However, five belong to the West Asian-specific R1b-Z1203, but none to the West European-specific R1b-M412. Also, all nine Yamnaya samples show Near Eastern admixture, described in the paper as Armenian-like.

Yamnaya subclades:

http://www.ancestraljourneys.org/ancientdna.shtml

R1b1a2a2*
R1b1a
R1b1a2a2
R1b1a2a*
R1b1a2a2
R1b1a2a2*
R1b1a2a2*
 
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