Random Assignments for Central Europeans of German Descent

I know Verona is in Veneto. :)
His grandmother was born up to 5 miles from Verona province. I questioned if her dialect could be closer to the dialect of Verona than to other Lombard dialects (since Mantova province is in Lombardy), already assuming that language may be a reference of "(sub)ethnicity". For example, the dialect spoken in Caneva-PN is the trevisani, certainly different from, say, the udinesi, never mind the fact the comune is in the region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia.


Caneva is in Pordenone area ...........Pordenone was in Veneto lands until the Austrians shifted the border of Veneto and Friuli to the Livenza river. you will find a very low % of people in Pordenone speak friulian , the most would be in Azzano Decimo ..............most people in Pordenone speak Veneto .
I have a few relatives in Pordenone province , one in Prata and other in Porcia........they only speak Veneto

The only province where Friulian dominates is Udine province

Even Trieste , which was never ever under Venice , it populace speak more higher percent Veneto than Friulian
 
Caneva is in Pordenone area ...........Pordenone was in Veneto lands until the Austrians shifted the border of Veneto and Friuli to the Livenza river. you will find a very low % of people in Pordenone speak friulian , the most would be in Azzano Decimo ..............most people in Pordenone speak Veneto .
I have a few relatives in Pordenone province , one in Prata and other in Porcia........they only speak Veneto
Yes, that was the point. I referred to my father's grandmother place in this sense, given the proximity to Verona province.
 
That Roman soldier FN2 from 300 AD found in Bavaria was likely too late for a Rhaetian proper, but he could have been sort of a "Rhaetian relic", je je, since he was somewhat shifted to modern Iberians

Hi dear fellow Regio. You are absolutely right. The FN_2 is an Iberian like. Cheers ;)

WeT4BWi.jpg


1Pp1364.jpg

HMvw8tW.jpg


bNPehU9.jpg

NF0zcZT.jpg


Sources:
https://www.pnas.org/content/115/13/3494

https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/s...80115.DCSupplemental/pnas.1719880115.sapp.pdf
 
Hi dear fellow Regio. You are absolutely right. The FN_2 is an Iberian like. Cheers ;)

WeT4BWi.jpg


1Pp1364.jpg

HMvw8tW.jpg


bNPehU9.jpg

NF0zcZT.jpg


Sources:
https://www.pnas.org/content/115/13/3494

https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/s...80115.DCSupplemental/pnas.1719880115.sapp.pdf


Roman soldier sampled from Munich (FN_2). We find some significant differences in regional ancestry comparing the Altheim individuals to FN2. For example, FN2 exhibits substantially more West Asian-like ancestry than ALH_1 and ALH_10 (Fig. S48), also consistent with Fig. S44-S46, and substantially more Middle Eastern-like and Southern European-like ancestry.

FN_2, and VIM_2 are lactase persistent.
 
Roman soldier sampled from Munich (FN_2). We find some significant differences in regional ancestry comparing the Altheim individuals to FN2. For example, FN2 exhibits substantially more West Asian-like ancestry than ALH_1 and ALH_10 (Fig. S48), also consistent with Fig. S44-S46, and substantially more Middle Eastern-like and Southern European-like ancestry.

FN_2, and VIM_2 are lactase persistent.

Hi @torzio.
Most likely he was a showy Roman soldier in his beautiful legionary’s uniform. The women with deformed skull must have been enchanted by him, but I very much doubt that he was enchanted by them. :grin:
Cheers (y):)
 
Hi dear fellow Regio. You are absolutely right. The FN_2 is an Iberian like. Cheers ;)

WeT4BWi.jpg


1Pp1364.jpg

HMvw8tW.jpg


bNPehU9.jpg

NF0zcZT.jpg


Sources:
https://www.pnas.org/content/115/13/3494

https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/s...80115.DCSupplemental/pnas.1719880115.sapp.pdf
Yep, it's explicitly in the paper:
"This is in contrast to the Roman soldier dating to around 300 AD sampled from the same region, for which its largest ancestry component was IBS, with greatest genetic similarity to modern Spanish and southern French individuals (SI Appendix, Fig. S31). Based on an analysis of patterns of haplotype sharing, the Roman soldier (FN_2: 11.08×) was found to have substantially more southern European, West Asian, and Middle Eastern ancestry than two normal-skulled Early Medieval Bavarians with high genomic coverage"

Notice they say modern Spanish and southern French. Not sure why they assumed a necessary SW ancestry in another part of the text then, considering these almost 2000 years.
"The analysis of his genome identifies him to be of southwest European origin."

How can they be so sure? It'd be like thinking Etruscans came from SW Euro because of genetic resemblance to modern Iberians. (It seems Etruscans were actually between modern Iberians and N. Italians. I'd have to re-check it. Still...)

That said, assuming the same approach was used to estimate their genetic resemblance to modern pops, I cogitated that FN2 was Rhaetian-like because of this same Etruscan shift toward modern Iberians, at the same time Rhaetian and Etruscan languages (non-IEs) were also related to one another, not to mention the area where the sample was found. Coincidence? Maybe it is, maybe it isn't. Plus, the soldier carried G-L42, the "Alpine" Y marker I mentioned (interestingly, the only basal G-Z40854 - his subclade - thus far is from Udine). Possibly another coincidence. :) I know the Etruscans samples are much older, but if the "late" Rhaetians - especially in Italy - were really not that different, I wouldn't be so surprised, after all, some genetic continuity may be expected in mountainous areas, and at the end "Italics" in NE Italy could be also similar to some Rhaetians (so an occasional mix would not necessarily result in a "that different" third group).
Now, I see these facts as clues. Truth is that we need ancient Rhaetian DNA to confirm or negate this possible feature of Rhaetian people (or at least part of them) as being close to modern Spanish and S. French in Autosomal.
 
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