Share Your IllustrativeDNA results Ancient and Modern

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The man in the middle is my 4th great grandfather with his children. And if the description on ancestry is correct, the guy in the upper right standing is my 3rd great grandfather.
 
They were from Belgium. Without hiring a professional genealogist that’s about as far back as I can go on that line. I have a couple other names on my tree that are his grandfather and father but it’s very speculative. Ultimately this line may have originated in France according to a Flemish priest that some of my family have spoken with when they went over there after World War Two.
 
They were from Belgium. Without hiring a professional genealogist that’s about as far back as I can go on that line. I have a couple other names on my tree that are his grandfather and father but it’s very speculative. Ultimately this line may have originated in France according to a Flemish priest that some of my family have spoken with when they went over there after World War Two.
Your 4th great grandfather reminds me the Belgium King Leopold II. The wearing of long, well-groomed beards in Europe at that time was a characteristic of European patriarchs at the time. Your great-great-grandfather was a very elegant man. I emphasize that your great-great-grandfather only physically resembles Leopold II of Belgium. I say this to emphasize only the physical appearance between the two because I know that Leopold II of Belgium was accused of committing terrible crimes in the Belgian Congo, which he managed as his private property in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
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You know I never noticed that. That beard style is right on the money. He was born 25 August 1833 Houwaart, Arrondissement Leuven, Flemish Brabant, Belgium. He is my direct paternal ancestor. Specifically he is my great, great, great, great grandfather. The photo with the whole family was taken here in the United States in 1880.
 
Also, His grandfather (my 6th great grandfather), born in 1753 was a dispensary for the French army when Belgium was under French rule and my 5th great grandfather was a farmer during the French republic after the French revolution.
 
I've been playing around with the customizable ancient ancestry tool and can get some interesting results.

Set to 5 populations.

MyHeritage:

Fit: 1.403 (good)

Insular Celt (AD 100–1000)65.0%

Italic and Etruscan (900–200 BC)12.4%

Germanic (AD 100–630)11.6%

Insular Celt (600 BC–AD 100)10.0%

Egyptian (780–400 BC)1.0%

Fit: 1.392 (good)

Insular Celt (AD 100–1000)69.8%

Germanic (AD 100–630)11.2%

Italic and Etruscan (900–200 BC)10.8%

Insular Celt (600 BC–AD 100)6.2%

Phoenician (1000–330 BC)2.0%


Ancestrydna:

Fit: 1.303 (good)

Insular Celt (AD 100–1000)65.0%

Italic and Etruscan (900–200 BC)11.0%

Germanic (AD 700–1000)10.0%

Insular Celt (600 BC–AD 100)9.8%

Egyptian (780–400 BC)4.2%

Fit: 1.303 (good)

Insular Celt (AD 100–1000)71.0%

Italic and Etruscan (900–200 BC)10.2%

Germanic (AD 700–1000)7.2%

Insular Celt (600 BC–AD 100)6.8%

Phoenician (1000–330 BC)4.8%


Due to southern Europe's connections with the Mediterranean as whole I'm guessing the Phoenician and Egyptian are part of some southern european ancestry I have.

Myheritage:

Insular Celt (AD 100–1000)76.6%

Italian (AD 650–1450)11.0%

Germanic (AD 700–1000)7.6%

France (AD 130–1400)4.8%

Ancestry:

Insular Celt (AD 100–1000)78.2%

Italian (AD 650–1450)10.2%

Germanic (AD 700–1000)5.6%

Iberian (AD 300–1200)4.0%

France (AD 130–1400)2.0%


I'm a bit surprised at the Germanic percent being somewhat low. The highest I've seen is around 14%
 
When I set region to Global, sub-region to Global, and population to no limit on Illustrative DNA and I got following results:

Bronze age

European Farmer (6300–2800 BC) 38.0%
Central Steppe (2100–1800 BC) 24.2%
Western Steppe (3300–2600 BC) 13.8%
Bronze Age Anatolian (3400–1500 BC) 10.4%
Canaanite (1800–1100 BC) 8.4%
Baltic Hunter-Gatherer (5200–4200 BC) 4.6%
Yellow River (2300–1900 BC) 0.6%


Iron Age

Thracian (1100–200 BC) 25.8%
Paeonian (750–100 BC) 22.2%
Balto-Slavic (900–350 BC) 20.4%
Anatolian (780–30 BC) 9.2%
Greek (770–400 BC) 9.0%
Germanic (AD 100–600) 6.8%
Phoenician (1000–330 BC) 5.6%
Amur River (1000–800 BC) 0.4%
Sinitic (1230–130 BC) 0.4%
Italic and Etruscan (900–200 BC) 0.2%


Migration Period

Roman Anatolia (100 BC–AD 700) 27.4%
Roman Illyria (AD 100–600) 24.4%
Baltic (AD 260–540) 14.6%
Slavic (AD 540–1100) 13.4%
Roman Sardinia (AD 400–500) 10.6%
Roman Pannonia (AD 130–600) 3.8%
Roman Levant (BC 50–AD 700) 1.8%
Germanic (AD 100–630) 1.4%
Roman Italy (20 BC–AD 600) 1.2%
South Amerindian (9000 BC–AD 1500) 0.6%
Rouran Khaganate (AD 330–550) 0.4%
Roman Gaul (AD 130–500) 0.2%
Old Bering Sea Culture (AD 200–1330) 0.2%


Middle Ages

Balkans (AD 500–1000) 29.0%
Byzantine Anatolia (AD 500–1100) 24.2%
Slavic (AD 540–1270) 19.8%
Baltic (AD 900–1050) 9.4%
Sardinian (AD 770–1000) 4.4%
Iberian (AD 300–1200) 4.2%
Levantine (AD 300–1300) 3.4%
France (AD 130–1400) 3.2%
European Jew (AD 1160–1400) 1.6%
Arabian Peninsula 0.4%
Mongolic (AD 900–1300) 0.4%
 
Thanks for sharing. Looks like you are in the periodic ancestry. Let's see your closest ancient, modern, 2-way, 3-way and customizable ancient/modern.

Here's what my periodic ancestry looks like same settings global/no limit.

Ancestrydna data:

Bronze Age:


Fit: 3.136 (Moderate)

Central Steppe (2100–1800 BC)65.4%
European Farmer (6300–2800 BC)33.8%
Western Steppe (3300–2600 BC)0.8%

Iron Age:

Fit: 1.597 (Good)

Insular Celt (600 BC–AD 100)71.4%
Germanic (AD 100–600)12.8%
Italic and Etruscan (900–200 BC)8.2%
Greek (770–400 BC)6.4%
Arabian Peninsula1.2%

Migration Period:

Fit: 1.262 (Good)

Roman Britain (AD 100–400)65.2%
Pict (AD 300–500)16.8%
Germanic (AD 100–630)6.4%
Roman Anatolia (100 BC–AD 700)5.4%
Roman Sardinia (AD 400–500)2.4%
Arabian Peninsula2.0%
Roman Iberia (AD 260–500)0.8%
Roman Gaul (AD 130–500)0.6%
South Amerindian (9000 BC–AD 1500)0.4%

Middle Ages:

Fit: 1.202 (Good)

Insular Celt (AD 100–1000)78.2%
Germanic (AD 700–1000)9.0%
Sardinian (AD 770–1000)6.2%
Arabian Peninsula2.8%
Levantine (AD 300–1300)1.8%
Balkans (AD 500–1000)1.6%
South Amerindian (9000 BC–AD 1500)0.4%

MyHeritage data:

Bronze Age:

Fit: 3.096 (Moderate)


Central Steppe (2100–1800 BC)59.0%
European Farmer (6300–2800 BC)34.6%
Western Steppe (3300–2600 BC)6.4%

Iron Age:

Fit: 1.692 (Good)

Insular Celt (600 BC–AD 100)78.6%
Italic and Etruscan (900–200 BC)11.8%
Greek (770–400 BC)4.6%
Germanic (AD 100–600)4.4%
South Amerindian (9000 BC–AD 1500)0.6%

Migration Period:

Fit: 1.274 (Good)

Roman Britain (AD 100–400)71.2%
Pict (AD 300–500)11.4%
Roman Anatolia (100 BC–AD 700)7.0%
Germanic (AD 100–630)7.0%
Roman Sardinia (AD 400–500)2.6%
South Amerindian (9000 BC–AD 1500)0.6%
Roman Gaul (AD 130–500)0.2%

Middle Ages:

Fit: 1.266 (Good)

Insular Celt (AD 100–1000)79.2%
Italian (AD 650–1450)8.6%
Germanic (AD 700–1000)6.4%
Sardinian (AD 770–1000)2.6%
Balkans (AD 500–1000)2.4%
South Amerindian (9000 BC–AD 1500)0.8%








 

Customizable Modern Ancestry (population: no limit)​


Southeast Europe 77.2%
Mainland Greece 44.2%
Greek (Peloponnese Messinia Messini) 16.0%
Greek (Thessaly) 15.0%
Greek (Epirus) 13.2%
Albania 11.0%
Albanian 11.0%
Balkan Slav 13.6%
Serb (Bosnia) 8.6%
Bosniak (Croatia) 5.0%
Aegean Sea 8.4%
Greek (Fourni-Ikaria) 8.4%
Sardinia
6.4%
Sardinian 6.4%
Sardinian (North) 6.4%
East-Central Europe 5.2%

West Slavic 5.2%
Slovakian 5.2%
West Europe
5.2%
French (Arpitan) 5.2%
French (Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes Rhone) 5.2%
East Europe
4.4%
East Slavic 4.4%
Ukrainian (Zhytomyr) 3.4%
Russian (Belgorod) 1.0%
Southwest Asia
1.4%
Arabian Peninsula 1.4%
Yemenite (Mahra) 1.4%
Americas
0.2%
Amerindian 0.2%
Pima 0.2%
Fit:
0.501 (Very Good)

Customizable Ancient Ancestry​


Thracian (1100–200 BC) 22.4%
Greek (770–400 BC) 20.4%
Baltic (AD 260–540) 19.6%
Byzantine Anatolia (AD 500–1100) 17.6%
Germanic (AD 700–1000) 6.0%
Balkans (AD 500–1000) 3.6%
Germanic (AD 100–630) 2.6%
Slavic (AD 540–1270) 2.4%
Baltic (AD 900–1050) 1.4%
Roman Italy (20 BC–AD 600) 1.2%
Italic and Etruscan (900–200 BC) 1.0%
Rouran Khaganate (AD 330–550) 0.8%
European Jew (AD 1160–1400) 0.6%
Arabian Peninsula 0.4%
Fit: 0.262 (Very Good)


Closest Ancient Samples​

Albanian (Ottoman Period) AD 1400–1700 2.737

South Illyrian 700–250 BC 3.340

Paeonian 750–100 BC 3.463

Albanian (Early Middle Ages) AD 770–990 3.537

North Illyrian 750–1 BC 3.705

Bulgarian Slav (Byzantine Period) AD 1000–1250 3.988

Central Italian (March of Tuscany) AD 850–1100 4.347

Central Italian (Papal States) AD 860–1430 4.409

Daunian (Messapic) 570–410 BC 4.572

Central Italian (Renaissance) AD 1600–1700 4.579

 
Last edited:
Ancient Two-Way

Two Way​

Fit: 1.354​

1.​

Estonian (Middle Ages)​

35.1%​

Mycenaean Greek​

64.9%​

Fit: 1.387​

2.​

Gleb Svyatoslavovich (Rurikid Dynasty)​

21.3%​

Albanian (Ottoman Period)​

78.7%​

Fit: 1.402​

3.​

Izjaslav Ingvarevych (Rurikid Dynasty)​

45.9%​

Mycenaean Greek​

54.1%​

Fit: 1.419​

4.​

Balt (Migration Period)​

32.5%​

Mycenaean Greek​

67.5%​

Fit: 1.422​

5.​

Estonia (Iron Age)​

34.3%​

Classical Greek (Himera)​

65.7%​

Fit: 1.426​

6.​

Slav (Krakauer Berg)​

41.4%​

Mycenaean Greek​

58.6%​

Fit: 1.430​

7.​

Balt (Migration Period)​

32.4%​

Classical Greek (Himera)​

67.6%​

Fit: 1.436​

8.​

Estonia (Iron Age)​

34.4%​

Mycenaean Greek​

65.6%​

Fit: 1.441​

9.​

Izjaslav Ingvarevych (Rurikid Dynasty)​

45.8%​

Classical Greek (Himera)​

54.2%​

Fit: 1.443​

10.​

Estonia (Iron Age)​

35.7%​

Hellenistic Greek (Empuries)​

64.3%​


 
Well at least to me, your results show that during the migration period, the Slavic peoples didn't totally replace the earlier Balkan populations like the Illyrians, Dacians, Thracians etc.
 
Well at least to me, your results show that during the migration period, the Slavic peoples didn't totally replace the earlier Balkan populations like the Illyrians, Dacians, Thracians etc.

By the time Slavs arrived there were no Illyrians, Dacians etc... They were all Romans.
 
By the time Slavs arrived there were no Illyrians, Dacians etc... They were all Romans.
Culturally, they were Romanized. Maybe someone could add to this but generally where the Romans conquered, they left little genetic impact on the region.
 
Culturally, they were Romanized. Maybe someone could add to this but generally where the Romans conquered, they left little genetic impact on the region.
They carry no memory of their origins, no epic poetry, myths, or even historiographic data. The information on Thrqcians, Illyrians, Dacians and other paleo-Balkan residents come from Greek or Roman sources, or even contemporary Western European historians, but not from memory of native Balkan people such as Aromanians, Vlachs and other paleo-Balkan related groups.

In my case, my ancestors of the last 300-400 years, are almost exclusively Macedonian Slavs with few Serbs.
 
They carry no memory of their origins, no epic poetry, myths, or even historiographic data. The information on Thrqcians, Illyrians, Dacians and other paleo-Balkan residents come from Greek or Roman sources, or even contemporary Western European historians, but not from memory of native Balkan people such as Aromanians, Vlachs and other paleo-Balkan related groups.

In my case, my ancestors of the last 300-400 years, are almost exclusively Macedonian Slavs with few Serbs.
Yes, culturally but the genetics of the ancient Balkan residents remain it seems.
 
Yes, culturally but the genetics of the ancient Balkan residents remain it seems.
In my case it seems so, but I am not sure for other Balkan Slavs.

Anyway, I feel no connection to paleo-Balkan ancestry, except of two or three small villages where my recent ancestors come from.
 

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