Famous J2 Individuals

American explorer James Felix "Jim" Bridger belonged haplogroup J2. Bridger was a western explorer in the first half of the 19th century and one of the first Europeans to see the Yellowstone area and the Great Salt Lake. He was descended from General Joseph Bridger (1631-1686), an early settler of Virginia originally from Gloucester, England. The Bridges DNA Project at FTDNA shows 2 descendants of Joseph in J-M172 Group 02.
 
American explorer James Felix "Jim" Bridger belonged haplogroup J2. Bridger was a western explorer in the first half of the 19th century and one of the first Europeans to see the Yellowstone area and the Great Salt Lake. He was descended from General Joseph Bridger (1631-1686), an early settler of Virginia originally from Gloucester, England. The Bridges DNA Project at FTDNA shows 2 descendants of Joseph in J-M172 Group 02.
Thank you for your post. I see these guys are more specifically J2b-L283>Y12007

I will open a new thread for "Notable J2b-L283 carriers" as it is misleading having a thread for "J2" carriers when this is a macrohaplogroup designation that doesn't entail any further information really. There is no need to lump together people with totally different origin backgrounds under it.

976159BridgerBartlett Bridger 1795-1854United StatesJ-M172
12
24
15
10
13-17
11
15
12
12
11
27
17
8-9
11
11
26
15
19
31
13-15-15-18
12
10
19-20
14
14
17
17
37-41
11
9
11
8
15-17
8
11
10
8
11
9
12
21-23
16
11
12
12
17
8
12
23
21
12
12
10
14
11
12
12
11
31
17
8
10
12
27
26
19
13
11
12
11
11
10
11
11
10
11
11
32
11
12
22
14
9
10
26
15
18
11
22
14
11
14
24
12
21
18
9
14
17
9
11
11
111409Bridger
EnglandJ-M172
12
24
15
10
13-17
11
15
12
12
11
27
17
8-9
11
11
26
16
19
31
13-15-15-18
11
10
19-20
14
14
17
18
36-40
11
9








































































21635BridgerWilliam Bridger, 1803 - 1864EnglandJ2b-L283>Y12007
12
24
15
10
13-17
11
15
12
12
11
27
17
8-9
11
11
26
16
19
31
13-15-15-18
12
10
19-20
14
14
17
17
36-39
11
9
11
8
15-17
8
11
10
8
11
9
12
21-23
16
11
12
12
17
8
12
23
20
12
12
10
14
11
12
12
11
31
17
8
10
12
27
26
19
13
11
12
11
11
10
11
11
10
11
11
32
11
12
22
14
11
10
27
15
18
11
22
14
11
14
24
12
21
18
9
14
17
9
11
11
979725BridgerBartlett Bridger b 1795 and d 1854United StatesJ-M172
12
24
15
10
13-17
11
15
12
12
11
27
18
8-9
11
11
26
16
19
31
13-15-15-18
12
10
19-20
14
14
17
17
36-41
11
9
11
8
15-17
8
11
10
8
11
9
12
21-23
16
11
12
12
17
8
12
23
20
12
12
10
14
11
12
12
11
31
17
8
10
12
27
26
19
13
11
12
11
11
10
11
11
10
11
11
32
11
12
22
14
11
10
26
15
18
11
22
14
11
14
24
12
21
18
9
14
17
9
11
11
97773Bridger
Unknown OriginJ-M172
12
24
15
10
14-17
11
15
11
12
11
27
17
8-9
11
11
27
16
19
31
13-15-15-18
12
10
19-20
14
14
17
17
36-41
11
9








































































938984BridgerJoseph Bridger b 1631 and d.1686EnglandJ-M172
12
24
15
10
14-17
11
15
12
12
11
27
17
8-9
11
11
27
16
19
31
13-15-15-18
12
10
19-20
14
14
17
17
36-41
11
9








































































13773BridgerJoseph Bridger, (1632-1686)EnglandJ-M172
12
24
15
10
14-17
11
15
12
12
11
27
17
8-9
11
11
27
16
19
31
13-15-15-18
12
10
19-20
14
14
17
17
36-41
11
9








































































 
In the Eupedia article about the J-2 Haplogroup, it is mentioned that Sir John Field (~1520-1586), the astronomer, is in the subclade J2b-Z8429. John Field's haplogroup designation is a subject of question within the Field Project, and I am wondering what the basis for the subclade designation is here.

I see you Fields being J2b-L283>Y16536. This post is quite old and more data was gathered over the time, so if you by chance are still active here and there on this forum could you inform us in regards to these samples here (perhaps you are even one of them?):

410 J2-FGC61400>FGC61398 Descendants of William Feild, Hertfordshire: BigY-345305/YF08379, FGC-NKDT5/YF11868









































































































554732FieldJohn Field, b: 1613 Hertfordshire, d. 1686 RIEnglandJ-FGC61400
12
24
15
11
13-16
11
15
13
12
11
28
16
8-9
11
11
28
16
19
29
13-15-15-16
11
10
19-20
13
15
16
20
36-42
11
9
11
8
15-17
8
12
10
8
11
9
12
23-23
16
11
12
12
18
8
12
24
20
12
12
11
14
10
13
13
11












































345305FieldWilliam Feild, b. bef 1600, Herts, UKEnglandJ-FGC61400
12
24
15
11
13-16
11
15
13
12
11
28
16
8-9
11
11
28
16
19
29
13-15-15-18
11
10
19-20
13
15
16
19
36-41
11
9
11
8
15-17
8
12
10
8
11
9
12
23-23
16
11
12
12
18
8
12
24
20
12
12
11
14
10
13
13
11
31
17
8
14
12
27
27
20
13
11
13
11
11
10
12
11
10
10
11
31
11
12
22
14
11
10
31
15
18
11
22
14
11
14
24
12
21
18
9
14
17
9
10
11
573747FieldJohn Field, b. ~1615 Hertfordshire, d. 1686 RIEnglandJ-FGC61400
12
24
15
11
13-16
11
15
13
13
11
29
16
8-9
11
11
28
16
19
29
13-15-15-18
11
10
19-20
13
15
16
19
36-41
11
9
11
8
15-17
8
12
10
8
11
9
12
23-23
16
11
12
12
18
8
12
24
20
12
12
11
14
10
13
13
11
31
17
8
14
12
27
27
20
13
11
13
11
11
10
12
11
10
10
11
31
11
12
22
14
11
10
31
15
18
11
22
14
11
14
24
12
21
18
9
14
17
9
10
11

John Field (astronomer) died in 1587 and the oldest tracked ancestor on the FTDNA project was born in 1613 and one vaguely before the 1600s. Is this a paternal relative or even direct descendant of John Field? Considering they trace ancestry to Hertfordshire it would be quite plausible and with that that John Field was indeed J2b-L283>Y16536.
 
according to ftdna discover tool
this legendary painter belonged to y haplogroup j2 (more specifically j2-L26 );)

Vincent van Gogh was a Dutch post-impressionist painter who posthumously became one of the most famous and influential figures in the history of Western art. He was born in Groot-Zundert, Netherlands on March 30, 1853, the oldest child in a family of art dealers. Despite his love for art, van Gogh struggled to find his place in the art world and suffered from depression and mental illness throughout his life.
Vincent drew as a child and worked as an art dealer as a young man. He often traveled for his work and became depressed after being transferred to London. He turned to religion and spent some time as a Protestant missionary in Belgium. After a period of poor health and loneliness, he moved back to his parents and took up painting in 1881 at age 28.
His younger brother Theo, also an art dealer, supported him financially and most of what is known about Vincent today comes from the over 650 surviving letters from their long and frequent correspondence.
Vincent_van_Gogh_-_Sunflowers_-_VGM_F458.jpg


Sunflowers, painted August 1889 (Public domain)
In Vincent’s early artistic career, he mostly depicted still objects and realistic peasant characters without many signs of the vivid colors that would later come to characterize his art. He moved to Paris in 1886 and met members of the avant-garde who were going against the impressionist style. In the following years, he experimented with colors, his paintings became brighter, and he developed the unique artistic style for which he is known.
Despite his talent, van Gogh struggled to gain recognition during his lifetime, and his work was often rejected by galleries and collectors. He lived in poverty and suffered from mental health issues. In 1888, he severed his own left ear with a razor. In 1889, he suffered a mental breakdown and voluntarily admitted himself to a mental asylum in Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, France. It was during this time that he produced some of his most famous works, including "Starry Night" and "Irises."
Van_Gogh_-_Starry_Night_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg



Van Gogh died at the age of 37 on July 29, 1890, after suffering a gunshot wound that was likely self-inflicted. Despite his tragic end, van Gogh's work has had a lasting impact on the art world, and he is now considered one of the greatest artists in history.
Vincent’s haplogroup was determined by Y-DNA testing of his great-great-grandnephew Lieuwe van Gogh, who is also a Dutch painter. Lieuwe’s great-great-grandfather was Theo van Gogh (1857-1891), the younger brother of Vincent van Gogh.
In 2014, Lieuwe van Gogh participated in Diemut Strebe’s science-art project Sugababe, which used genetic engineering to reconstruct Vincent van Gogh's ear using DNA from an original letter from Vincent and cartilage samples from Lieuwe’s ear.
Genetic information sourced from Toine van der Weerden: Van Gogh versus de Groot verslag. Biographical information from Wikipedia. Pictured: Vincent van Gogh Self-Portrait, September 1889 (Public domain). See also: Lieuwe van Gogh's website.




source:

https://discover.familytreedna.com/y-dna/J-L26/notable




 
according to ftdna discover tool
this legendary painter belonged to y haplogroup j2 (more specifically j2-L26 );)

Vincent van Gogh was a Dutch post-impressionist painter who posthumously became one of the most famous and influential figures in the history of Western art. He was born in Groot-Zundert, Netherlands on March 30, 1853, the oldest child in a family of art dealers. Despite his love for art, van Gogh struggled to find his place in the art world and suffered from depression and mental illness throughout his life.
Vincent drew as a child and worked as an art dealer as a young man. He often traveled for his work and became depressed after being transferred to London. He turned to religion and spent some time as a Protestant missionary in Belgium. After a period of poor health and loneliness, he moved back to his parents and took up painting in 1881 at age 28.
His younger brother Theo, also an art dealer, supported him financially and most of what is known about Vincent today comes from the over 650 surviving letters from their long and frequent correspondence.
Vincent_van_Gogh_-_Sunflowers_-_VGM_F458.jpg


Sunflowers, painted August 1889 (Public domain)
In Vincent’s early artistic career, he mostly depicted still objects and realistic peasant characters without many signs of the vivid colors that would later come to characterize his art. He moved to Paris in 1886 and met members of the avant-garde who were going against the impressionist style. In the following years, he experimented with colors, his paintings became brighter, and he developed the unique artistic style for which he is known.
Despite his talent, van Gogh struggled to gain recognition during his lifetime, and his work was often rejected by galleries and collectors. He lived in poverty and suffered from mental health issues. In 1888, he severed his own left ear with a razor. In 1889, he suffered a mental breakdown and voluntarily admitted himself to a mental asylum in Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, France. It was during this time that he produced some of his most famous works, including "Starry Night" and "Irises."
Van_Gogh_-_Starry_Night_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg



Van Gogh died at the age of 37 on July 29, 1890, after suffering a gunshot wound that was likely self-inflicted. Despite his tragic end, van Gogh's work has had a lasting impact on the art world, and he is now considered one of the greatest artists in history.
Vincent’s haplogroup was determined by Y-DNA testing of his great-great-grandnephew Lieuwe van Gogh, who is also a Dutch painter. Lieuwe’s great-great-grandfather was Theo van Gogh (1857-1891), the younger brother of Vincent van Gogh.
In 2014, Lieuwe van Gogh participated in Diemut Strebe’s science-art project Sugababe, which used genetic engineering to reconstruct Vincent van Gogh's ear using DNA from an original letter from Vincent and cartilage samples from Lieuwe’s ear.
Genetic information sourced from Toine van der Weerden: Van Gogh versus de Groot verslag. Biographical information from Wikipedia. Pictured: Vincent van Gogh Self-Portrait, September 1889 (Public domain). See also: Lieuwe van Gogh's website.




source:

https://discover.familytreedna.com/y-dna/J-L26/notable





Really cool.
 
I don't know if anyone has ever seen his paintings in person, but as wonderful as they look in reproductions, it's nothing to the impact they make in person, partly because the paint is so thick it rises from the frame and it all becomes almost three dimensional.

Another one of my favorites:

wheat-field-with-cypresses-digital-remastered-edition-vincent-van-gogh.jpg
 
I don't know if anyone has ever seen his paintings in person, but as wonderful as they look in reproductions, it's nothing to the impact they make in person, partly because the paint is so thick it rises from the frame and it all becomes almost three dimensional.

Another one of my favorites:

wheat-field-with-cypresses-digital-remastered-edition-vincent-van-gogh.jpg

… went to “Beyond Van Gogh” … last September:

7GEDgui.jpg


qs4Zabk.jpg


AkYI1Fp.jpg
 
according to ftdna discover tool
this legendary painter belonged to y haplogroup j2 (more specifically j2-L26 );)

Vincent van Gogh was a Dutch post-impressionist painter who posthumously became one of the most famous and influential figures in the history of Western art. He was born in Groot-Zundert, Netherlands on March 30, 1853, the oldest child in a family of art dealers. Despite his love for art, van Gogh struggled to find his place in the art world and suffered from depression and mental illness throughout his life.
Vincent drew as a child and worked as an art dealer as a young man. He often traveled for his work and became depressed after being transferred to London. He turned to religion and spent some time as a Protestant missionary in Belgium. After a period of poor health and loneliness, he moved back to his parents and took up painting in 1881 at age 28.
His younger brother Theo, also an art dealer, supported him financially and most of what is known about Vincent today comes from the over 650 surviving letters from their long and frequent correspondence.
Vincent_van_Gogh_-_Sunflowers_-_VGM_F458.jpg


Sunflowers, painted August 1889 (Public domain)
In Vincent’s early artistic career, he mostly depicted still objects and realistic peasant characters without many signs of the vivid colors that would later come to characterize his art. He moved to Paris in 1886 and met members of the avant-garde who were going against the impressionist style. In the following years, he experimented with colors, his paintings became brighter, and he developed the unique artistic style for which he is known.
Despite his talent, van Gogh struggled to gain recognition during his lifetime, and his work was often rejected by galleries and collectors. He lived in poverty and suffered from mental health issues. In 1888, he severed his own left ear with a razor. In 1889, he suffered a mental breakdown and voluntarily admitted himself to a mental asylum in Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, France. It was during this time that he produced some of his most famous works, including "Starry Night" and "Irises."
Van_Gogh_-_Starry_Night_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg



Van Gogh died at the age of 37 on July 29, 1890, after suffering a gunshot wound that was likely self-inflicted. Despite his tragic end, van Gogh's work has had a lasting impact on the art world, and he is now considered one of the greatest artists in history.
Vincent’s haplogroup was determined by Y-DNA testing of his great-great-grandnephew Lieuwe van Gogh, who is also a Dutch painter. Lieuwe’s great-great-grandfather was Theo van Gogh (1857-1891), the younger brother of Vincent van Gogh.
In 2014, Lieuwe van Gogh participated in Diemut Strebe’s science-art project Sugababe, which used genetic engineering to reconstruct Vincent van Gogh's ear using DNA from an original letter from Vincent and cartilage samples from Lieuwe’s ear.
Genetic information sourced from Toine van der Weerden: Van Gogh versus de Groot verslag. Biographical information from Wikipedia. Pictured: Vincent van Gogh Self-Portrait, September 1889 (Public domain). See also: Lieuwe van Gogh's website.




source:

https://discover.familytreedna.com/y-dna/J-L26/notable





Many thanks, I saw it on my FTDNA Notable connections some days ago. It would be great to have further news regarding his subclade under JL26, because this clade is a bit too old.
 
@Salento, I went to that exhibit too, it was great! I also went to one similar based on King Tut.
… the Boy King, … very cool Jovialis :)
 
This is BS. First of all there are many living descendants of the house of Montgomery who have been tested and they either belong to J2 or R1b, showing that after 1,000 years non-paternity events do occur.
Secondly, there is absolutely no reliable evidence that the Montgomery family descends from the same patrilineal lineage as the Dukes of Normandy. I should know, I descend from both houses and analysed my genealogy in detail.

Furthermore, the DNA testing of Richard III's remains were tested (G2a) and compared with several descendants of the House of Plantagenet (all R1b-U152) and didn't match, showing once again that non-paternity events happened even in royal families.

The only conclusive evidence of Rollo or William the conqueror's Y-DNA would have to come from testing directly their remains.
 
This is BS. First of all there are many living descendants of the house of Montgomery who have been tested and they either belong to J2 or R1b, showing that after 1,000 years non-paternity events do occur.
Secondly, there is absolutely no reliable evidence that the Montgomery family descends from the same patrilineal lineage as the Dukes of Normandy. I should know, I descend from both houses and analysed my genealogy in detail.

Furthermore, the DNA testing of Richard III's remains were tested (G2a) and compared with several descendants of the House of Plantagenet (all R1b-U152) and didn't match, showing once again that non-paternity events happened even in royal families.

The only conclusive evidence of Rollo or William the conqueror's Y-DNA would have to come from testing directly their remains.
Agree
I thought that in order to publish such an article
In Researchgate they might have evidence
Rather than assuming
 
Last edited:
Another laughable statement about J2-M172 from self proclaimed "experts" who use macrohaplogroups in their argumentation and claim "it can be shown to have originated in the fertile crescent" 🤣. Literally no clue about uniparental analysis and get the stupid idea that paleolithic lineages are the answer to deciphering someone's geneaology.

Meanwhile we find 13-10.000 year old basal and the oldest Mesolithic J2-M172 samples in Kotias and the northern Caucasus something which is the case for J1-M267 basal lineages too. Remembering those old super basal samples in Eastern Europe.

Ah sure "directly descend from ancient Semitic peoples", maybe it's that mysterious Levantine mass migration? One embarrassing statement after another.
 
Could you elaborate if you have full access. Do we know anything beyond J2?
I think the J2 they're talking about is J2a-Y13128>Y14434>Y14439>Y16842>Y22056. So yeah the pseudoscientific fertile crescent blabbering is utter non sense. I don't have a list of Y13128 distribution but from what I remember it has been found from the Panonnian plain to Eastern Balkans, Pelagonia? and the Aegean spanning from the Neolithic (Chalcolithic) to the IA.
 

This thread has been viewed 71475 times.

Back
Top