Genetic structure of the early Hungarian conquerors inferred from mtDNA and Y-DNA

thank you for the links, I'll just study them

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thank you for the links, I'll just study them

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https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/hungarian-magyar-y-dna-project/about/background

The project's aim is to test the highest possible number of Hungarian (Magyar) surnames. Our primary goal is to discover who belonged to which tribe or ethnic group when entered the Carpathian Basin. Please note that this project is only for ethnic Magyar surnames to minimize the impact of post-17th century settlement and assimilation.
 
This is interesting. Mi birth name is Nagy. I was tested by Living DNA. Do you know if I have to redo the test if I join? Its a question of cost and gain. :)

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This is interesting. Mi birth name is Nagy. I was tested by Living DNA. Do you know if I have to redo the test if I join? Its a question of cost and gain. :)

Gesendet von meinem SM-G903F mit Tapatalk

Anyone who wants to join the project should mail the administrator and provide basic information why he wants to do so (earliest known paternal ancestor, surname etc.). If the applicant matches the criteria (high likeliness of Magyar origin) he could join the project before ordering the test that would make a discount price for testing available. The acceptance of members is decided by the admin or co-admin.
 
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12520-018-0609-7

There were three R1a and two R1b statistically predicted Y haplogroups among the male skeletons (Table 3). These are the most frequent and second most frequent haplogroups (25.6 and 18.1% respectively) in the present Hungarian population (Völgyi et al. 2009). King Béla III was inferred to belong to haplogroup R1a. The R1a Y haplogroup relates paternally to more than 10% of men in a wide geographic area from South Asia to Central Eastern Europe and South Siberia (Underhill et al. 2010). It is the most frequent haplogroup in various populations speaking Slavic, Indo-Iranian, Dravidian, Turkic and Finno-Ugric languages (Underhill et al. 2010).

King Béla III was inferred to belong to haplogroup R1a. (R1a-Z93 ?!)
 
King Béla III was inferred to belong to haplogroup R1a. (R1a-Z93 ?)

possible, see the eye area of the king's right skull:

III_B%C3%A9la.jpg

http://sirasok.blog.hu/2011/02/22/pogany_szertartas_az_arpad_hazi_kiralyok_udvaraban
 
Dear Ordas!

Adj'Isten, Földi! (Old hungarian greetings: It meens: Give God, Man from my homeland)

It is incredible, but one of my ancestor line (Simon family) also lives in Nyírkáta too, like your grandpa. But before 1955 the name of the village was Gebe.

I'm looking for the archeogenetical heritage the families from Nyírség. Especially the southern region, my homeland. At this time I know all of my 8 great-great grandfathers Y-chr haplogroup.
E1b1b-V13-Z17107* (Küzmös family) Penészlek, Nyírbéltek, Nyírvasvári
R1b-U106-Z381-DF98-S22069* (Dobi family) Balkány
R1b-U152-L2-Z49-S8172* (Béres family) Nyírbéltek
I2A-L621-A1328* (Tóth family) Nyírbéltek
R1a-M458-L260-YP415* (Kalenyák family) Penészlek, Nyírvasvári
R1a-L664-S2866 (Simon family) Nyírvasvári, Nyírkáta, Terem
I2A-L621-Y4460 (Kiss family-not completed yet) Penészlek
I1-L22 (Szilágyi family-not completed yet) Penészlek

Unfortunately just two MtDNA haplogroup were detected at this time:
H16f-earliest known source: Helena Huba 1807-1835 Penészlek
H4a1a4b-e.k.s: Mária Horváth 1801-1872 Geszteréd

They all lived in the Southern Nyírség, no more just 25 km-s from Nyírkáta.

It seems, the current people of the Nyírség, have mixed origin. All the family names (except the Kalenyák - which is a polosh one) is a very tipically hungarian names. The family names in Hungary, created in the XIV. century. So these genes since the XIV. century were present in the hungarian population. I would be grateful if you help with me to expand my database from the Southern Nyírség peoples.

I have a Nagy ancestor family too, from Nyírvasvári the neighboring village from Nyírkáta. The last known ancestor was Veronika Nagy (1858-1935) Her husband was György Kalenyák. Unfortunately I cannot find any previous data, because in an 1880 fire the church birth/death registers were destroyed. Maybe you don't know in your Nagy family a Veronika with this datas?
 
Dear Ordas!

Adj'Isten, Földi! (Old hungarian greetings: It meens: Give God, Man from my homeland)

It is incredible, but one of my ancestor line (Simon family) also lives in Nyírkáta too, like your grandpa. But before 1955 the name of the village was Gebe.

I'm looking for the archeogenetical heritage the families from Nyírség. Especially the southern region, my homeland. At this time I know all of my 8 great-great grandfathers Y-chr haplogroup.
E1b1b-V13-Z17107* (Küzmös family) Penészlek, Nyírbéltek, Nyírvasvári
R1b-U106-Z381-DF98-S22069* (Dobi family) Balkány
R1b-U152-L2-Z49-S8172* (Béres family) Nyírbéltek
I2A-L621-A1328* (Tóth family) Nyírbéltek
R1a-M458-L260-YP415* (Kalenyák family) Penészlek, Nyírvasvári
R1a-L664-S2866 (Simon family) Nyírvasvári, Nyírkáta, Terem
I2A-L621-Y4460 (Kiss family-not completed yet) Penészlek
I1-L22 (Szilágyi family-not completed yet) Penészlek

Unfortunately just two MtDNA haplogroup were detected at this time:
H16f-earliest known source: Helena Huba 1807-1835 Penészlek
H4a1a4b-e.k.s: Mária Horváth 1801-1872 Geszteréd

They all lived in the Southern Nyírség, no more just 25 km-s from Nyírkáta.

It seems, the current people of the Nyírség, have mixed origin. All the family names (except the Kalenyák - which is a polosh one) is a very tipically hungarian names. The family names in Hungary, created in the XIV. century. So these genes since the XIV. century were present in the hungarian population. I would be grateful if you help with me to expand my database from the Southern Nyírség peoples.

I have a Nagy ancestor family too, from Nyírvasvári the neighboring village from Nyírkáta. The last known ancestor was Veronika Nagy (1858-1935) Her husband was György Kalenyák. Unfortunately I cannot find any previous data, because in an 1880 fire the church birth/death registers were destroyed. Maybe you don't know in your Nagy family a Veronika with this datas?
Dear kuzmosi,
Adj Isten!
I'm sorry, since my Nagy lineage is from my paternal line, I justvhave the male names and don't know nothing about the eventual sisters.
I will send you in a PM this branch of my family tree ( what I know about it) maybe it helps...

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Several explanations have been suggested for the striking absence of Tat C in the linguistically Uralic modern Hungarian population (Rootsi et al., 2000; Semino et al., 2000b). One is that Voguls and Ostyaks, and many other Siberian populations obtained this Y-chromosomal lineage only relatively recently, after the ancestors of the Magyars had left the Siberian forests for the great Eurasian steppe. Another is that Hungarians and Siberian Ugric-speaking populations have always been genetically unrelated despite their linguistic affinities. A third possibility is that the ancestral Magyars did have the Tat C allele, but lost it through genetic drift during their migration to Hungary, or after their settlement there.

My favorite :"...Voguls and Ostyaks, and many other Siberian populations obtained this Y-chromosomal lineage only relatively recently..."

The Tat C allele was found to be frequent not only among the Finno-Ugric populations but also among Latvians and Lithuanians.

"Perhaps the Siberian-like people did not introduce Finnic languages into the Baltic. Perhaps that was someone else. But I doubt it. That being said, though the Siberian-like component adds great distinctiveness to the Finns, it is important to add that by and large Finns are actually generic (if highly drifted) Northern Europeans."

https://www.gnxp.com/WordPress/2018...baltic/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter
 
"Perhaps the Siberian-like people did not introduce Finnic languages into the Baltic. Perhaps that was someone else. But I doubt it. That being said, though the Siberian-like component adds great distinctiveness to the Finns, it is important to add that by and large Finns are actually generic (if highly drifted) Northern Europeans."

https://www.gnxp.com/WordPress/2018...baltic/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter
Didn't had the huns Tat C too?


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"It has been widely accepted that the Finno-Ugric Hungarian language, originated from proto Uralic people, was brought into the Carpathian Basin by the conquering Hungarians. From the middle of the 19th century this view prevailed against the deep-rooted Hungarian Hun tradition, maintained in folk memory as well as in Hungarian and foreign written medieval sources, which claimed that Hungarians were kinsfolk of the Huns. "

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0205920
 
"It has been widely accepted that the Finno-Ugric Hungarian language, originated from proto Uralic people, was brought into the Carpathian Basin by the conquering Hungarians. From the middle of the 19th century this view prevailed against the deep-rooted Hungarian Hun tradition, maintained in folk memory as well as in Hungarian and foreign written medieval sources, which claimed that Hungarians were kinsfolk of the Huns. "

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0205920

There's a dedicated thread for the new paper which I just started today. Check the new posts or activity section.
 
http://real.mtak.hu/88674/1/Bernert_AK2018.pdf

Bernert Zs., Fehér T., Varga D., Székely G., Németh E.:
[FONT=Times New Roman,Times New Roman PS][FONT=Times New Roman,Times New Roman PS]Testimony from the Bones of Hungarian King Béla III – Origins of the Árpád Dynasty. [/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman,Times New Roman PS][FONT=Times New Roman,Times New Roman PS]The role of applications based on machine learning is continuously growing in the industry, health sector/bioinformatics and scientific research. American researchers published a bit more than 10 years ago the first machine learning algorithms, which were able to safely predict Y-SNP based haplogroups from Y-STR data. [/FONT][/FONT]

[FONT=Times New Roman,Times New Roman PS][FONT=Times New Roman,Times New Roman PS]The goal of the present study was to predict with machine learning algorithms the SNP-based subgroup of three ancient DNA samples (King Béla III and two Khazar samples) belonging to Y-DNA Haplogroup R1a, in order to predict their geographic origin and mutual genetic relatedness more accurately. This is the first study applying machine learning algorithms for researching Hungarian prehistory.
Based on the Y-STR haplotype of King Béla III, we estimated with the machine learning algorithm in the first step that he belonged to the R1a-Z93 subgroup that is most common among Indo-Iranic and Turkic speaking peoples. The second step predicted that King Béla III belonged to the Z2123 subgroup of R1a-Z93. The Phylogenetic analysis showed King Béla III most likely belonged to the relatively rare YP451+ YP449- subgroup of Z2123, which practically only appears in the North Caucasus, especially among Karachays and Balkars.
Based on our results, we could hypothetically conclude that the Árpád Dynasty has common origin with one ethnic component of the Karachay people.
In our study we proved that it is possible to increase the accuracy of Y-DNA haplogroup prediction of historical aDNA samples with mathematical methods using contemporary Y-STR haplotypes. With the help of this method, larger historical aDNA studies could save a lot of research funds and DNA carrying out tailored deep SNP-testing of samples instead of using general SNaPshots.
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
Keywords: [FONT=Times New Roman,Times New Roman PS][FONT=Times New Roman,Times New Roman PS]Physical anthropology; Archaeogenetics; Machine learning; Y-SNP prediction; Y-STR; Gradient boosting; Árpád Dynasty; King Béla III; Hungarian ethnogenesis. [/FONT][/FONT]
 

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