Greatest Spanish contribution(s) to the world ?

What is/are the greatest Spanish contribution(s) to the world?

  • Spanish food (tapas, paella, tortilla, Iberian pork, churros, etc.)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • The classical guitar

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Spanish painting (Goya, Velásquez, Dali, Picasso, Miro, etc.)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • The invention of cigarettes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • The epidural analgesia

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Other (please specify)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1
Cadieux dancers of ancient Rome, according to Martial and other classical authors. Century I.
http://www.andalucia.cc/viva/mujer/vidas/bailarinas_gaditanas.html

In Rome, the dancers of Cadiz were as famous as the Syrian and equally desirable and exciting in dance and song. His presence was required in many feasts of Rome, happy people (Plin. 1.15). Martial (VI.71) describes one as follows : Expert in lascivious postures to the sound of castanets and dance béticas as the rhythms of Gades, capable of returning the force on the members of the old Pelias And of burning her husband of Hecuba herself beside the funeral pyre of Hector. Teletusa consume and torture to its former owner. Sold as a servant and has now purchased for a concubine.

The earliest mention of the dancers of Cadiz, who were also at the same time singing and music, we read in Strabo (II.3.4), taking the data of Posidonius, which at the beginning of s. I a. C., was in Cadiz studying the phenomenon of the tides.





Perhaps these ancient dances are the source of flamenco.
 
Since there were no protestantism in America by then you may understand that their activies were (in most cases) quite different from those that made the Inquisition so infamous. Jesuit missions in Latin America were very controversial in Europe, especially in Spain and Portugal where they were seen as interfering with the proper colonial enterprises of the royal governments. The Jesuits were often the only force standing between the Native Americans and slavery.

Regards.

Millions of Amerindians were killed by the Spaniards because they refused to convert the Christianity. This in my eyes is just another expression of the spirit of religious madness of the Spanish Inquisition. And the Jesuits are linked to massacres and tortures in both Europe and the Americas.
 
If you have to rely on movies for people to have heard of your writings then you couldn't possibly have been that influential.

I can't understand this reasoning. That's justly because they were renowned writers to start with that Hollywood or Disney adapted the stories on screen. Harry Potter sold tens of millions of copies before the first film was made, for instance. Hollywood will take any good story in any language. It's true that English-speaking literature has an advantage compared to other languages, but there are countless screen adaptation from French, Russian or Japanese books, yet very few from Spanish ones.

Most people who watch Disney movies haven't got the slightest idea of who the authors behind those tales are.

It doesn't matter. Most people don't know anything about anything. How many people do you know who can tell you who invented the piano or the submarine or the lawn mower or the microwave oven ? What interests me in this kind of topic is the overall influence that a nation had on the rest of the world and on modern society, regardless of whether people were aware of it. Many people will read the polls and learn for the first time that the Dutch invented the CD and CD-ROM, a Belgian invented the saxophone, a Frenchman invented photography, and a Spaniard invented epidural analgesia. Yet they did it, and people all over the world are grateful for it. That's what I mean by "contribution to the world". Now in what way did authors such as Quevedo or Lope de Vega have a similar impact on global modern society ?
 
Millions of Amerindians were killed by the Spaniards because they refused to convert the Christianity. .

I dread getting involved in these types of topics as they tend ignite firestorms. The above claim seems to have been taken 'out of the playbook' of Protestant Dutch propaganda from the days of the Dutch-Spanish wars. Much of the wildly exaggerated accusations that were turned out en masse by printing presses and eagerly read by societies that had high literacy rates (Dutch and English) have come to be accepted as actual history.

The literate Protestant countries made great efforts to paint their enemies in as evil, lurid terms as possible. Thus we see little about French, Italian, or other Catholics. The Spanish, however, were depicted to be some sort of disgusting, evil subhuman people. 'Spaniard' acquired connotations of gross, immoral, thuggish, and filthy, etc. It was implied that all of them were as inbred as their ruling class was.

The picture of Spaniards running around killing indigenous people who refused to convert is as embellished as the numbers given by these same sources for deaths from the Spanish Inquisition. Recall numbers thrown about such as the 93 million, a number of people that surpassed the actual amount of people living in all of Europe at the time.


The Spanish were clearly more concerned with labor issues than they were with actually caring what people believed. They wanted the silver and the gold mined. The refusal of many Spanish to dig trenches in the Netherlands speaks volumes about the essentially medieval outlook many Spanish had towards manual labor.

We can see practices in Mexico, for example that are not even thinly veiled as Christian. Santeria also exists is Latin American countries. I doubt that the authorities really cared much as long as long as their priests were confident that no one’s heart was being cut out from their chest while alive.

Protests from Spanish religious people (monks, priests) who abhorred the treatment of the natives were voiced about the treatment itself. One does not read complaints from these people such as "The civil authorities went in and killed everybody".

Smallpox killed far more indigenous than swords or musket balls. The death rate among these people from diseases is what lead to the African slave trade. They needed people (in their view) to do the work.


Were the Spanish nice or benevolent to the indigenous? Of course not. Europeans across the board were awful to those that lived in the Americas, as were the societies that grew out of them. But we should try to get away from the ideas of widespread atrocities that have come to be accepted as fact but were mostly just accusations made by their enemies.
 
Millions of Amerindians were killed by the Spaniards because they refused to convert the Christianity. This in my eyes is just another expression of the spirit of religious madness of the Spanish Inquisition. And the Jesuits are linked to massacres and tortures in both Europe and the Americas.

Millions of amerindians were turned into slaves and killed by the greed of the spanish... soldiers and by epidemics of new diseases introduced by the europeans.

Today, millions of amerindians, and latin americans of other different ethnic backgrounds in Central America, Mexico and most part of South America are fiercely catholics, more than the spaniards and even more than the italians. Central America/Southern-Mexico (the regions with the biggest ammount of amerindian population) are probably the most catholic regions in the continent.

I find hard to believe that the Catholic Church accomplished such thing through a bloody rampage of twisted tortures and murders of apocalyptic porpotions. Such overdimensioned histories are more proper of american terror films from the 60's or protestantism's Black Legend.

Regards.
 
I dread getting involved in these types of topics as they tend ignite firestorms. The above claim seems to have been taken 'out of the playbook' of Protestant Dutch propaganda from the days of the Dutch-Spanish wars. Much of the wildly exaggerated accusations that were turned out en masse by printing presses and eagerly read by societies that had high literacy rates (Dutch and English) have come to be accepted as actual history.

The literate Protestant countries made great efforts to paint their enemies in as evil, lurid terms as possible. Thus we see little about French, Italian, or other Catholics. The Spanish, however, were depicted to be some sort of disgusting, evil subhuman people. 'Spaniard' acquired connotations of gross, immoral, thuggish, and filthy, etc. It was implied that all of them were as inbred as their ruling class was.

The picture of Spaniards running around killing indigenous people who refused to convert is as embellished as the numbers given by these same sources for deaths from the Spanish Inquisition. Recall numbers thrown about such as the 93 million, a number of people that surpassed the actual amount of people living in all of Europe at the time.


The Spanish were clearly more concerned with labor issues than they were with actually caring what people believed. They wanted the silver and the gold mined. The refusal of many Spanish to dig trenches in the Netherlands speaks volumes about the essentially medieval outlook many Spanish had towards manual labor.

We can see practices in Mexico, for example that are not even thinly veiled as Christian. Santeria also exists is Latin American countries. I doubt that the authorities really cared much as long as long as their priests were confident that no one’s heart was being cut out from their chest while alive.

Protests from Spanish religious people (monks, priests) who abhorred the treatment of the natives were voiced about the treatment itself. One does not read complaints from these people such as "The civil authorities went in and killed everybody".

Smallpox killed far more indigenous than swords or musket balls. The death rate among these people from diseases is what lead to the African slave trade. They needed people (in their view) to do the work.


Were the Spanish nice or benevolent to the indigenous? Of course not. Europeans across the board were awful to those that lived in the Americas. But we should try to get away from the ideas of widespread atrocities that have come to be accepted as fact but were mostly just accusations made by their enemies.


Nicely put...

There is much history that has been purposely exaggerated. Every month or so I read new material that refutes previously accepted historical information.
 
For any 'Simpsons' fans out there, the best line I ever heard was from the Nuclear Reactor's owner C. Montgomery Burns.

He of course is a character engrossed in the past. He speaks as if terms such as Prussia, Siam, autogyro, etc, are still in use to describe existing states or services. He once asked about the status in his stock in "Consolidated Slave Holdings". He answers the telephone with Alexander Graham Bell's suggested greeting of "Ahoy, ahoy".


Anyway, one day he sees the comic book store owner and says "Look at the that portly fellow CALMLY eating candy like a Spaniard!"

He spits out 'Spaniard" as if he has to force himself to say it. It is hilarious.
 
For any 'Simpsons' fans out there, the best line I ever heard was from the Nuclear Reactor's owner C. Montgomery Burns.

He of course is a character engrossed in the past. He speaks as if terms such as Prussia, Siam, autogyro, etc, are still in use to describe existing states or services. He once asked about the status in his stock in "Consolidated Slave Holdings". He answers the telephone with Alexander Graham Bell's suggested greeting of "Ahoy, ahoy".


Anyway, one day he sees the comic book store owner and says "Look at the that portly fellow CALMLY eating candy like a Spaniard!"

He spits out 'Spaniard" as if he has to force himself to say it. It is hilarious.

Yes, quite hilarious. :LOL:(y)
 
In the past some Eastern European countries were very bad propaganda to all things Spanish, from the effects linger even today, in practice any other European power killed more people during the Inquisition and made more atrocities in their colonies to Spain, but as always, a wool carding and others are famous.
 
Millions of Amerindians were killed by the Spaniards because they refused to convert the Christianity. This in my eyes is just another expression of the spirit of religious madness of the Spanish Inquisition. And the Jesuits are linked to massacres and tortures in both Europe and the Americas.
That is completely false and part of the black legend. The spaniards didn't kill millions of amerindians. About 99% of the deaths were caused by small pox and other european diseases to which amerindians were not prepared.
 
Carlitos;during the Inquisition and made more atrocities in their colonies to Spain said:
OK, I am curious.

What phrase translates as 'wool carding'? and what does it mean literally?
 
I don't think that Spanish literature or fashion had a big impact on other cultures or is among the most widely acclaimed worldwide.
Well, Spain has some examples of impact global literature such us Don Quixote, which has been translated in more than 50 languages.
 
OK, I am curious.

What phrase translates as 'wool carding'? and what does it mean literally?

Please, Carlitos help! What did you mean by 'Wool carding"? I'll take help from anyone here.

I mean, what exact Spanish words are used here and what do they mean when phrased in that manner?
 
OK, I am curious.

What phrase translates as 'wool carding'? and what does it mean literally?


Carded wool would work either physically or intellectually.



Unos cardan la lana y otros se llevan la fama.

En positivo: Unos trabajan bien y otros se llevan la fama de ese trabajo.


En negativo: Unos hacen fechorías y otros se llevan la mala fama de esas fechorías.
 
Please, Carlitos help! What did you mean by 'Wool carding"? I'll take help from anyone here.

I mean, what exact Spanish words are used here and what do they mean when phrased in that manner?


In this case I mean that in most countries that brought the Inquisition had more civilian executions in Spain, but the bad reputation it has Spain.

Unos cardan la lana y otros se llevan la fama.
 
In this case I mean that in most countries that brought the Inquisition had more civilian executions in Spain, but the bad reputation it has Spain.

Unos cardan la lana y otros se llevan la fama.


I did not have a problem with it. I was just wondering if there was some type of Spanish colloquial saying that I had never heard.
 
^

El lenguaje coloquial español es muy refranero.
 
Well, cardan is the spanish word for "card" as in carding wool.

So this "refrane" losely would translate"

Some card the wool (lana) and others take credit (fama) for it.


And what does this have to do with Spains greatest contributions?

The truth be told and understood, what many claim as European contributions are actually re-cycled/copied Middle Eastern (Sumar (Babylon) Egypt, The Levant, Persia Africa and China etc etc. "contributions to mankind". However, since this is a European Forum , one can make whatever claims because it's not about the Middle East (is it?).

The "refranero" is more likely to rightly refer to the Middle East and East as the carders, and Europeans as the ones who get credit (fame) for it.

Let's be honest about our European ancestors. When the Pyramids were built, the small tribes of Europe were mostly clothed in animal skins and lived in huts and caves.

Melusine
 
Well, cardan is the spanish word for "card" as in carding wool.

So this "refrane" losely would translate"

Some card the wool (lana) and others take credit (fama) for it.


And what does this have to do with Spains greatest contributions?

The truth be told and understood, what many claim as European contributions are actually re-cycled/copied Middle Eastern (Sumar (Babylon) Egypt, The Levant, Persia Africa and China etc etc. "contributions to mankind". However, since this is a European Forum , one can make whatever claims because it's not about the Middle East (is it?).

The "refranero" is more likely to rightly refer to the Middle East and East as the carders, and Europeans as the ones who get credit (fame) for it.

Let's be honest about our European ancestors. When the Pyramids were built, the small tribes of Europe were mostly clothed in animal skins and lived in huts and caves.

Melusine


Thank you for the translation
 
In the Spanish language, carda'n is actually the common word for joint (usually, a mechanical joint).

"Carta" refers to various types of playing cards or a letter document. More official cards are known as tarjetas; things like boarding passes, credit cards, etc.
 
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