Politics Here we go again: Right wing nationalism on the rise again in Europe

A forth big support for Hungary is the Austro-Hungary's Jewish community, that was very consistent in Transylvania as well,which is the place of origin of Harvey Keitel's mother.


Perspective


Although Western Wallachia has the lowest natality and economical power ever,you just can't rely only on simple mathematics:


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=lD46_lSluvs
 
In adolescence, I have met some people from the Szekelyland on a national geography contest,it was a burden for me these kind of events,however,I usually went,because there were great parties after ,and the professors were quite understanding, they knew that I don't like the extremely repeated way of learning,but they rely on my intelligence.


The campus' rooms were grouped for two counties each,we got the Szeklers.
I remember that they were extremely politely and they look at us,at start,as we were some sort of aliens;10 minutes later,they have learnt the taste of beer,party,while I knew some Hungarian speech,before they have introduced me to their girls from the next door.


As we party,I was trying to keep a high-quality atmosphere ,when I saw a blonde,green-eyed Hungarian girl who just jumps next to me and puts my hand on her hips,I surely didn't liked that so I grabbed her by the hair,Eniko was her name.


After the good-looking Eniko has tempered herself and dressed really nice ,we went together at the campus' party.
 
In adolescence, I have met some people from the Szekelyland on a national geography contest,it was a burden for me these kind of events,however,I usually went,because there were great parties after ,and the professors were quite understanding, they knew that I don't like the extremely repeated way of learning,but they rely on my intelligence.


The campus' rooms were grouped for two counties each,we got the Szeklers.
I remember that they were extremely politely and they look at us,at start,as we were some sort of aliens;10 minutes later,they have learnt the taste of beer,party,while I knew some Hungarian speech,before they have introduced me to their girls from the next door.


As we party,I was trying to keep a high-quality atmosphere ,when I saw a blonde,green-eyed Hungarian girl who just jumps next to me and puts my hand on her hips,I surely didn't liked that so I grabbed her by the hair,Eniko was her name.


After the good-looking Eniko has tempered herself and dressed really nice ,we went together at the campus' party.

This bizarre and nonsensical anecdote for your physical abuse against this woman has earned you an infraction for Disruptive/provocative behavior.
 
Hungary's parliamentary elections aren't going to be rocking the boat politically for the world, but it is indeed indicative of a rise in nativism and nationalist anxiety. As a guy living in the US, I find Europe's politics fascinating...I hold out hope that this is indeed a case of pendulum swinging (as somebody mentioned above).

In the grand scheme though, I think that we live in the midst of a period that will have some difficulties and conflict as the world transitions further into globalization. To me, the flares in nationalism are inevitable responses to the brave new world of the last 60 years. Even if the xenophobia is completely invalid and irrelevant, economic anxiety makes people hear out the demagogues and scapegoating that they disregarded when things were going well. Easy to fall for "our economy is bad because immigrants" if you're suffering economically and need self-validation.

Birth rates dropping aren't so much an issue for Europeans as it is a trend that the entire world will eventually go through as more countries develop. With the advent of medicine, increase in women's rights and choice over their bodies, as well as some of the good points Angela mentioned...the entire way we look at having kids/reproducing (as a quantity) has changed in the last century. In the pre-industrial world, having 1 or 2 kids meant a high risk of losing them all. The rate of survival to adulthood was certainly tragic by standards of today. But with medical advancement and improved quality of life, making it to adulthood is no longer a worry, and parents have kids with the expectation that they will grow up, etc. Thus, in such a world, it is more economically prudent to have 1-2 kids and devote your resources towards maximizing their success. The "8 children households" are typically an image of poverty rather than products of economic wealth.

In any case, lower fertility rates are here to stay in developed nations, and so the only way a country will be able to sustain growth is through immigration. Regardless of reactionaries and nationalist outbursts, the trajectory we are on is for increased international connectivity and movement of peoples/cultures, and waning value of "national" borders and isolationist policies. Globalization will be a bumpy ride though, certainly.
 
Hungary's parliamentary elections aren't going to be rocking the boat politically for the world, but it is indeed indicative of a rise in nativism and nationalist anxiety. As a guy living in the US, I find Europe's politics fascinating...I hold out hope that this is indeed a case of pendulum swinging (as somebody mentioned above).

In the grand scheme though, I think that we live in the midst of a period that will have some difficulties and conflict as the world transitions further into globalization. To me, the flares in nationalism are inevitable responses to the brave new world of the last 60 years. Even if the xenophobia is completely invalid and irrelevant, economic anxiety makes people hear out the demagogues and scapegoating that they disregarded when things were going well. Easy to fall for "our economy is bad because immigrants" if you're suffering economically and need self-validation.

Birth rates dropping aren't so much an issue for Europeans as it is a trend that the entire world will eventually go through as more countries develop. With the advent of medicine, increase in women's rights and choice over their bodies, as well as some of the good points Angela mentioned...the entire way we look at having kids/reproducing (as a quantity) has changed in the last century. In the pre-industrial world, having 1 or 2 kids meant a high risk of losing them all. The rate of survival to adulthood was certainly tragic by standards of today. But with medical advancement and improved quality of life, making it to adulthood is no longer a worry, and parents have kids with the expectation that they will grow up, etc. Thus, in such a world, it is more economically prudent to have 1-2 kids and devote your resources towards maximizing their success. The "8 children households" are typically an image of poverty rather than products of economic wealth.

In any case, lower fertility rates are here to stay in developed nations, and so the only way a country will be able to sustain growth is through immigration. Regardless of reactionaries and nationalist outbursts, the trajectory we are on is for increased international connectivity and movement of peoples/cultures, and waning value of "national" borders and isolationist policies. Globalization will be a bumpy ride though, certainly.

Douglas Murray; Brings America A Very Real Warning "Great Speech"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J75-UsMhKBo

The Strange Death Of Europe - 1 of 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lf6yUS4smg
 
Hungary's parliamentary elections aren't going to be rocking the boat politically for the world, but it is indeed indicative of a rise in nativism and nationalist anxiety. As a guy living in the US, I find Europe's politics fascinating...I hold out hope that this is indeed a case of pendulum swinging (as somebody mentioned above).
In the grand scheme though, I think that we live in the midst of a period that will have some difficulties and conflict as the world transitions further into globalization. To me, the flares in nationalism are inevitable responses to the brave new world of the last 60 years. Even if the xenophobia is completely invalid and irrelevant, economic anxiety makes people hear out the demagogues and scapegoating that they disregarded when things were going well. Easy to fall for "our economy is bad because immigrants" if you're suffering economically and need self-validation.

Birth rates dropping aren't so much an issue for Europeans as it is a trend that the entire world will eventually go through as more countries develop. With the advent of medicine, increase in women's rights and choice over their bodies, as well as some of the good points Angela mentioned...the entire way we look at having kids/reproducing (as a quantity) has changed in the last century. In the pre-industrial world, having 1 or 2 kids meant a high risk of losing them all. The rate of survival to adulthood was certainly tragic by standards of today. But with medical advancement and improved quality of life, making it to adulthood is no longer a worry, and parents have kids with the expectation that they will grow up, etc. Thus, in such a world, it is more economically prudent to have 1-2 kids and devote your resources towards maximizing their success. The "8 children households" are typically an image of poverty rather than products of economic wealth.

In any case, lower fertility rates are here to stay in developed nations, and so the only way a country will be able to sustain growth is through immigration. Regardless of reactionaries and nationalist outbursts, the trajectory we are on is for increased international connectivity and movement of peoples/cultures, and waning value of "national" borders and isolationist policies. Globalization will be a bumpy ride though, certainly.

https://www.ft.com/content/838d60c2-0961-11e7-97d1-5e720a26771b

https://www.thelocal.se/20170216/employment-increases-among-swedens-foreign-born-population


“We want our politics built on families,” said Prime Minister Orbán. “Make families again the core of European politics. Families and children are really a blessing—not just for the nation, but for the entire European community.”

http://abouthungary.hu/blog/we-want...-orban-on-the-family-housing-support-program/
 
Hungary's parliamentary elections aren't going to be rocking the boat politically for the world, but it is indeed indicative of a rise in nativism and nationalist anxiety. As a guy living in the US, I find Europe's politics fascinating...I hold out hope that this is indeed a case of pendulum swinging (as somebody mentioned above).

In the grand scheme though, I think that we live in the midst of a period that will have some difficulties and conflict as the world transitions further into globalization. To me, the flares in nationalism are inevitable responses to the brave new world of the last 60 years. Even if the xenophobia is completely invalid and irrelevant, economic anxiety makes people hear out the demagogues and scapegoating that they disregarded when things were going well. Easy to fall for "our economy is bad because immigrants" if you're suffering economically and need self-validation.

Birth rates dropping aren't so much an issue for Europeans as it is a trend that the entire world will eventually go through as more countries develop. With the advent of medicine, increase in women's rights and choice over their bodies, as well as some of the good points Angela mentioned...the entire way we look at having kids/reproducing (as a quantity) has changed in the last century. In the pre-industrial world, having 1 or 2 kids meant a high risk of losing them all. The rate of survival to adulthood was certainly tragic by standards of today. But with medical advancement and improved quality of life, making it to adulthood is no longer a worry, and parents have kids with the expectation that they will grow up, etc. Thus, in such a world, it is more economically prudent to have 1-2 kids and devote your resources towards maximizing their success. The "8 children households" are typically an image of poverty rather than products of economic wealth.

In any case, lower fertility rates are here to stay in developed nations, and so the only way a country will be able to sustain growth is through immigration. Regardless of reactionaries and nationalist outbursts, the trajectory we are on is for increased international connectivity and movement of peoples/cultures, and waning value of "national" borders and isolationist policies. Globalization will be a bumpy ride though, certainly.
Well said, mratmilano.
 
Douglas Murray; Brings America A Very Real Warning "Great Speech"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J75-UsMhKBo

The Strange Death Of Europe - 1 of 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lf6yUS4smg
Deficit of vitamin D3 gets people in depression and phobias. At the extreme, experienced drivers can become afraid to drive a car. This affects all aspects of life, and is paralyzing. I've witnessed this phenomenon few times amongst friends here in Canada.
You live so far north and it's been a long winter...
 
Deficit of vitamin D3 gets people in depression and phobias. At the extreme, experienced drivers can become afraid to drive a car. This affects all aspects of life, and is paralyzing. I've witnessed this phenomenon few times amongst friends here in Canada.
You live so far north and it's been a long winter...

"You are the only doctor who has been able to give me any direction - I can't say what it means when someone with a chronic illness is finally given some hope for relief from such an annoying symptom."
http://www.neurologique.org/thankyou.html
 
I still can't believe people want to be sent back to medieval times, would they be happy to have guards barging into peoples homes and sending them off to the dungeon for not praying to the right god or being forced to break rocks or pick peas for the local Baron in his cozy castle? They should really question whether these newly elected power hungry maniacs are "in it" for the nation (and not for themselves).
Well... ironically what you just said is the reason of the right wing raise in Europe, Islam.
 
Well... ironically what you just said is the reason of the right wing raise in Europe, Islam.

The only problem is that that would explain the increasing support to right-wing positions in Western Europe, mainly in countries like France, Germany and Sweden, but in Poland, in Hungary, in Ukraine? Islam is the religion of less than 0.3% of Hungarians, in Poland only 0.1% of the population is Muslim, in Ukraine just 0.6% to 0.9% (and many of them are in fact native European & Ukrainian nationals of steppe Turkic origin). Islam is simply a minor religion in those countries, and there are undoubtedly more people of Poland or Ukraine living outside their country than immigrants "invading" those countries. Hungary, according to its own official statistics, has a mere 151k immigrants, out of which 99.2k (66%) are from Europe, not the feared "others" (source: https://www.ksh.hu/docs/eng/xstadat/xstadat_annual/i_wnvn001b.html)

Who are those people trying to fool as if they were big targets threatened by massive hordes of Muslim foreigners who want to stay there and take their land (especially worrisome when they just happen to be brown-skinned, I must add ironically)?

If they really believe that, then they must be suffering from a political sort of anxiety disorder or panic syndrome. The funny thing is that the scapegoating seems to work even when the Islam bogeyman is far far away. Even in Germany right-wing anti-Islam sentiments are mainly increasing in Eastern Germany, where the percentage of Muslims is tiny and probably most people outside Berlin and other big centers rarely if ever see a Muslim family in their neighborhoods.
 
Hungary's parliamentary elections aren't going to be rocking the boat politically for the world, but it is indeed indicative of a rise in nativism and nationalist anxiety. As a guy living in the US, I find Europe's politics fascinating...I hold out hope that this is indeed a case of pendulum swinging (as somebody mentioned above).

In the grand scheme though, I think that we live in the midst of a period that will have some difficulties and conflict as the world transitions further into globalization. To me, the flares in nationalism are inevitable responses to the brave new world of the last 60 years. Even if the xenophobia is completely invalid and irrelevant, economic anxiety makes people hear out the demagogues and scapegoating that they disregarded when things were going well. Easy to fall for "our economy is bad because immigrants" if you're suffering economically and need self-validation.

Birth rates dropping aren't so much an issue for Europeans as it is a trend that the entire world will eventually go through as more countries develop. With the advent of medicine, increase in women's rights and choice over their bodies, as well as some of the good points Angela mentioned...the entire way we look at having kids/reproducing (as a quantity) has changed in the last century. In the pre-industrial world, having 1 or 2 kids meant a high risk of losing them all. The rate of survival to adulthood was certainly tragic by standards of today. But with medical advancement and improved quality of life, making it to adulthood is no longer a worry, and parents have kids with the expectation that they will grow up, etc. Thus, in such a world, it is more economically prudent to have 1-2 kids and devote your resources towards maximizing their success. The "8 children households" are typically an image of poverty rather than products of economic wealth.

In any case, lower fertility rates are here to stay in developed nations, and so the only way a country will be able to sustain growth is through immigration. Regardless of reactionaries and nationalist outbursts, the trajectory we are on is for increased international connectivity and movement of peoples/cultures, and waning value of "national" borders and isolationist policies. Globalization will be a bumpy ride though, certainly.

Excellent comment. But the challenge of very low fertility rates is already impacting even non-developed, emerging countries in such a fast pace that it'll probably have those countries even more paralyzed than the developed countries, especially because they have less resources to adapt to this new and still unknown world of aged population and low population of children and teenagers. In many states of Brazil, including the most populous ones like São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Rio Grande do Sul, the fertility rates are low even for European standards, around 1.4-1.6 (the national rate is not much higher, 1.8), and in China fertility rates have dropped to similar levels around 1.5. I agree with your points, but I'd just say that this challenge is now a global issue, not just a European one or a "first-world problem". It is just that Europe entered that phase earlier than others, so what we'll see there - the good and the bad consequences - is probably going to happen very soon in other places, even in emerging markets like Brazil, China and Turkey.
 

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