R1b decreased in historical/civilized times

Mmiikkii

Regular Member
Messages
462
Reaction score
72
Points
28
Ethnic group
southern EUROPEAN
With the coming of the CWC and Bell Beakers, Europe has got their current 1 population that comes in 3.
Basically because nobody from outside has come in since(you could argue that Yamnaya/EHG were in Russia, but not in the West).

Anyway, that population was (and still is) majority R1b in the masculine paternal side(defined also with the explosion in H haplogroup, and maybe bringing back some U from the Steppe). Here's the map.
View attachment 13440

It's nothing new that it peaks in W. Europe, but even though is a MAJORITY, we can ONLY say it's a TOTAL MAJORITY in places very Far West(Atlantic coast) that WEREN'T controlled by the ROMAN Empire, neither INVADED by the 'BARBARIANS'.

Places like Spain, France and England were controlled by the Romans.
But they're in the Western part of Europe, and weren't the center of the Empire even though wealthy. These countries still have clear R1b majorities.
But since they WEREN'T ISOLATED from the Romans AND GERMANICS,
R1b lost a piece of the share in the haplogroup landscape when civilization grew more developed.


In earlier Metal Ages times the clans and nations seemed to organized themselves in a clear tribal kinship way, but since History proper and the State came into Europe, R1b stopped from being the only 1, to be a majority among several others.
A new pattern emerged where others are able to integrate from other parts of Europe not neccessarily by PATRILINEALITY, but by which seems to be CULTURAL INTEGRATION(I suspect the Chistian Church partially based on an Hebrew religion may had something to do).


People from the Greek and S. Italian Mediterranean ancestry came through the Romans(that ultimately hailed from Anatolia, maybe Levant).
And also I1s and R1a that were in the INTERIOR of the continent(Scandinavia and E. Europe), made an additional comeback in the North(particularly ex-Roman places settled by Germanics).


Which leads me to my 2nd point.
You see, the bigger picture is R1b increases westward, something we know since the year 2000.

The finer picture seems to be there's a 2nd 'hidden' correlation with later and less Romanization(civilization) with R1b supermajorities.

As well as a clear separation among the Atlantic countries(Spain, France and England) and the inner ones(Sweden, Germany and Italy), where Eastern haplogroups seem to have penetrated more profoundly.
 
There is a strong decrease in the percentage of R1b in north central France, compared to the regions of Antlantic France, in a situation maybe similar to north western Iberia.

I wonder if it was already the case in the bronze age, because the Bell Beaker settled mostly on the coast and the Rhine-Alpine region, but not that much in the center of France, or if the low percentage of R1b in north central France its the result of later migration from Levantine/Greek/Numidian during the time of the Roman empire or in the early middle age
 
That groove in the middle of France seems to be a continuation of Roman lands.
East to that there was more R1b, and inmediately afterthat there's more I1/R1a in Germany
 
I'm looking forward to even more ancient specimens from Europe from the Copper Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age, the Medieval period, and modern populations with both shotgun sequencing and 1240K panel testing, for ancient specimens, and WGS testing of modern populations so that the picture becomes even clearer about frequencies of paternal and maternal haplogroup subclades and autosomal groups. There are some things that I am interested in that are still unanswered.
 
I'm looking forward to even more ancient specimens from Europe from the Copper Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age, the Medieval period, and modern populations with both shotgun sequencing and 1240K panel testing, for ancient specimens, and WGS testing of modern populations so that the picture becomes even clearer about frequencies of paternal and maternal haplogroup subclades and autosomal groups. There are some things that I am interested in that are still unanswered.

For the last I can't help you, but here's this
http://haplotree.info
Inside there's also a link to Carlos Quiles site.
In his interactive map you can see the admixture proportions.
 

This thread has been viewed 1919 times.

Back
Top