What do you like and dislike about each language ?

Dutch = pure
English = simple
French = noble
German = technical
Greek = strong
Hungarian = impossible
Italian = class
Portuguese = strange
Slavic languages = virile
Spanish = singing
...
 
French: although it is my second language, it is my preferred one. I love its perpetual metaphors, its easy grammar, the beauty of the 1835 orthography (in spite of imperfections like "j" instead of "g" in many words), its potential of expressing so many things and emotions. I like its internationality, as it can suppress the problems (like in genetics). Although I have never dwelt in Canada or Switzerland or the Channel Islands, I nevertheless use huitante and heurif on a daily basis, as well as tuque, chandail, magasiner, bleuet, bouticopie, stationnement, chandail, cochambreur, goger une grippe often enough, as well as most of the so-called Belgicisms. The only thing I don't like is how Parisians (and their fans) are trying to impose their junk words to the rest of the world, and how they Anglicise their French. As for the music, unfortunately, it is a taboo. Nevetheless, I like bands like Les Trois accords, and use the Gregorian chant in French. Unfortunately, francophone metal and punk are not enough diversified or developped.

Walloon: it is, among the Romance languages, the one with the biggest Germanic adstrate. I like its grammar, because of: the supercomposed past tense; the use of the infinitive in a sentence which is coordinated with the precedent one; the substativised infinitive in a subordonated temporal sentence; the subjunctive future; its conditional sentences; the exclusive use of "to have" auxiliary verb; its various pronunciations; its Celtic substrate words; its imaginative expressions; the richness of its vocabulary; its direct way of saying the things; its similitudes with Romansh, Romanian, Lombard, and Spanish, in vocabulary and grammar. What I don't like: the phonetical and crypto-phonetical orthographic systems. Walloon deserves an etymological orthography!

Romanian: I don't like how the Academy of Bucharest created an almost artificial language, using the skeleton of the traditional Romanian language, which is spoken in Transylvania, and even in the two Moldavies. I was used with books of the 19th century. I like very much in Romanian the endless phrases, made of many sentences. I like the vocalic harmony (as observed in Transylvania), the palatalisations (the more, the better), the rhotacism. I like the phrases begining with the predicate, the attribute adjectives falling always after the noun. I am fond of the many borrowings from Hungarian, which allow you to use agglutinative words in a Romance language.

Romansh: I am sorry that their RG did not operate as a reunion of ensembles (as in Walloon or in early ABN or in Occitan), but as an intersection of their dialects. I understand easily writeen RG, but prefer the dialect of M?stair valley when spoken. They also have huge borrowings from French and Italian, instead of building their neologisms from existant words, interdialectal borrowings etc.

Lombard: I like its variety between small dialects, as well as the common features the Alpine variants have with Romanian (rhotacism, melting of b/v), and their shared vocabulary and expressions, in spite of the breakup being of more than one millennium old. I don't like how their have transformed the ce, ci /tʃ/ sound into /ʃ/ or /ss/, and how their lost the e vowel at the end of the words.

American Spanish seems rather easy and beautiful, especially as spoken by women. I don't see many inconveniencies.

Occitan and catalan are easy to read, but I don't understand much when I hear them talk. On the other hand, I generally understand spoken Portuguese, and answer in Spanish, and they answer back in Portuguese, and so on. It seems to be peasantly charming with their phonetics.

Hungarian is a language that will still be alive in 3000 AD, because it is conservative and self-sufficient (what other language has something as beautful as marokt?vbesz?lő?). I also like its vocalic harmony. Its noun cases are difficult, but fair things are always complex. Also the absence of the verb "to have".

Unfortunately, I don't speak any Slavic or Celtic language, although there are many words I understand in both families. I hope one day I would learn a Northern Slavic language like Polish, Ruthenian, or Ukrainian. I like how they palatalise everything, and don't open much their mouth when they talk, as well as the Hungarian loanwords. Between the Celtic languages, I would have more chances, "logistically", to learn Breton, but I am scared by their phonetics and much more (I one tried to learn Welsh, and gave up). On the other hand, Scottish Gaelic seems much easier, and has a beautiful phonology (the /ʃ/, the /ɯ/). Also the absence of the verb "to have" in the Celtic languages makes them all difficult.

In English I like mostly the psalms as translated by Miles Coverdale, and the BCP majestic language. In no other language do we see such almost-pleonasms: All glory and thanksgiving be to thee [...], for that thou of thy tender mercy [...]; who, by his own oblation of himself once offered, made a full, perfect, and sufficient sacrifice, oblation, and satisfaction... But the non-sensical words we see in every-day second-hand English has nothing praiseworthy. The globbish tongue will be a victim of its own success.
 
Learning foreign languages is significant these days. I feel that any informed individual must learn new languages. In any case, I incline toward English to other unknown dialects. Why? English is turning into a worldwide language. A half of billion people in the world use English at home or work. English is the language which is known generally of our fine, great and astounding world. English is far reaching to such an extent that it has become the standard language for a wide range of global correspondence.


A great deal of issues of the 21st century, for example, the issues of war and harmony, environment, can not be tackled without communicating in a similar language.


The English language is currently the principal language of around 350 million individuals, the local language of 12 countries and the official language of in excess of 33 countries. It implies that one of seven individuals on the planet communicates in English.


English is likewise the worldwide language of financial specialists, pilots and air traffic regulators, athletes, researchers and understudies. In the event that you need to be an attendant, a pilot or an air control official you need to learn English, the language of global correspondence. Consistently a great many people from Eastern Europe go to different countries as tourists or to work. They can't abandon knowing the language of the nation they are going to. A modern engineer or even a specialist can't work with an imported instrument or a machine on the off chance that he can't peruse the guidance how to do that.


A few people learn English since they need it in their work; others to go on board and for heaps of individuals learning English is only an interest.


I have been learning English since the age of 11. I like learning English without question. Be that as it may, I like and know well my local language, Russian. The incomparable German writer Goethe once stated: "“He, who knows no foreign language, does not know his own one.”." I agree with him. The information on English encourages me to learn other languages.


The information on English is an extraordinary force. I have to know English. I take online lessons via Skype with English tutors twice a week. I like it. I must appreciate and embrace this knowledge as the key to achievement of my dreams. I hope my progress in English will be very good.
 
English is turning into a worldwide language. A half of billion people in the world use English at home or work. English is the language which is known generally of our fine, great and astounding world. English is far reaching to such an extent that it has become the standard language for a wide range of global correspondence.

There are alternatives. Spanish/Castillian has not lost the fought yet. The globbish English language - could we call it "newlang"? - is loosing its nature, and is becoming a kind of creole. The "second-language Anglophones" have outnumbered the native speakers. The same is not true about Spanish, because it is ahead the English in numbers, and also because most of Hispanophones speak it as their native language.

English is likewise the worldwide language of financial specialists, pilots and air traffic regulators, athletes, researchers and understudies. In the event that you need to be an attendant, a pilot or an air control official you need to learn English, the language of global correspondence. Consistently a great many people from Eastern Europe go to different countries as tourists or to work. They can't abandon knowing the language of the nation they are going to. A modern engineer or even a specialist can't work with an imported instrument or a machine on the off chance that he can't peruse the guidance how to do that.

Yes, precisely, this is how the Soviet Union projected the universalisation of the Russian language. Did it succeed?

I incline toward English to other unknown dialects.

Let's only grow and eat apples. Nevermind of the small fruits about which nobody knows nothing. By the way, why should we save endangered species? Apples are just fine.
 
I am a language lover, so I think that all the languages could have their own specifics, but there is not anything that you could dislike.
 

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