Etruscan possibly Gaelic + Brythonic.

lynxbythetv

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Hello plebs.
Too begin with I have noticed some commonalities between Etruscan, Gaelic and the Brythonic languages. I have sourced Irish Gaelic, Welsh, Cornish and Manx to jail break this supposed hard to decipher language.
Good one linguists.
Too begin I'll start with the Etruscan gods and the name ras/rasna.
Etruscan. Ras/Rasna/Rasnna.
Manx. Rasyn, seed. Rassan, plant. Gaelic. Ros/Rois, flaxseed and Woods. Cornish. Ras, virtue.
Etruscan. Tinn, the lighting god.
Gaelic.
Tinn, sore painful distressing.
Tintri, fiery hot tempered.
Tine, fire.
Tinntreacht, lightning.
Latin, fulgar=lightning : Gaelic, Dart/Javelin= fogha.
Etruscan. Alpan, uncertain meaning.
Gaelic. Alpan, Lump, chunk, chunky person. Could also be a designation for a big feature perhaps like the Alps mountain range.
Etruscan. Achuvesr, unknown character mentioned along with Turan the war god.
Gaelic. Archu, fierce dog, war hound, warrior.
Etruscan. Calu, wolf god.
Gaelic. Ciallu, interpretation. Ciall which means sense sanity. I'm not certain with this one.
Etruscan. Cathu & Cath.
Gaelic. Cathu, Cathaigh, Cath, Cathaigh,battle & fight, warlike. Bit surprised this one slipped through as Cath in the form of Catholic, Cathar, Katherine or even Caithcart (surname) feature as present.
Etruscan. Cel, Goddess of the earth.
Gaelic, Coill, Woods forest. Ceil, conceal suppress.
Manx. Keyll, Forest.
Cornish. Koos, Forest.
Welsh. Cel, Concealment.
Cel clearly means forest and the root word for conceal comes from Forest. I'd imagine the original term for the Celts corresponds with Forest Clan's/People or Celsclan.
Etruscan. Horta, Horticulture. Wikipedia says it's it's highly conjectural. Gaelic. Gort, field, cultivated field.
Etruscan. Leinth, no exact meaning, can be Male or Female.
Gaelic. Leanbh, child.
Also Lean means to follow but L'ean means Deep affliction, grief.
Manx. Lhianoo, Child.
Etruscan. Lasa/Lares. Undetermined meaning although Wikipedia does mention it was important for all events the issue is the spelling, which is correct. Not confident with this one.
Cornish. Las , alcohol.
Etruscan. Lur, god of war, prophetic nature.
Cornish. Loor, Moon.
Welsh. Lloer, Moon.
Lur is supposed to be tied in with L?ran yet the only match I can find in Gaelic is Loran and it means weak young creature, orphan, youngster and child. Doesn't sound particularly warlike.
Etruscan. Maris, god of war.
Gaelic. Maru, killing, slaying, slaughter. Maraigh, kill.
Etruscan. Rath, Tarquinia was his sanctuary.
Gaelic. Rath, bestow, grant, grace, gift of prophecy .
Etruscan. Selvans, God of Boundries.
Cornish. Selwyans, Salvation. This could be a Cornish modern adoption of Salvation. Cornish. Sel, base and foundation.
Sethlans. Man holding tools, perhaps a blacksmith or arrow maker.
Cornish. Seth, Arrow. Sethigow, Dart. Setha, shoot. Sethores, Archer.
Here's a quick one. Creice is believed to be Etruscan for Greek but in Gaelic Creice means skeleton.
Etruscan. Summanus, nocturnal god of thunder.
Gaelic. Suamhneas, peace and tranquillity.
Etruscan. Suri Suri, unknown meaning.
Gaelic. Saru, infringment violation of rule. Saraigh, violate, transgress. Not confident .
Etruscan. Nortia/Nurtia. Chance, time, date & Destiny. Associated with a nail in the wall.
Gaelic. Neart, Nuertu, strength, force, power, bodily strength.
Etruscan. Orcus ? Greek Hokros.
Gaelic. Orc, promise. Ocras, hunger.
Etruscan. Thesan, Goddess of Dawn.
Gaelic. Teas, heat, hotness warmth. Cornish, Tesa, heat. Welsh. Twyn, heat, hot.
Etruscan. Tiur, Tiv, Tivr. Unknown diety.
Gaelic. Tir, Country, land, state & Nation.
Etruscan. Tlusc. Unknown Deity.
Gaelic. Tlus, lies & falsehood. Tlas, weakness, feeble, gentleness. Also Lus, herb.
Etruscan. Mean/meanpe, associated with Nike and Victory.
Manx. Meain, Metals & Ores.
Etruscan. Usil, sun-god depicted holding fire balls, also has angel wings.
Gaelic. Ursal, fire tongs. Uasal, Nobleman. Uasal (place) sacred to the dead, hallowed, enchanted, place of fairies. ?????? Not confident.
Etruscan. Turms. Messenger, deliverer of souls
Welsh. Turm, (obsolete) a group of people especially cavalry.
Etruscan. Uni, marriage, fertility, family.
Welsh. Uno, join, Unite, amalgamate, together.
 
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I 'll come agin to answer you but at first sight you gathered here a very messy storing of unrelated or poorly related concepts and false phonetical links, at first sight I repeat.
 
The above video is a pretty Irish lass speaking Gaelic. Perhaps that's how Etruscan sounded. Ive mainly been using teanglann for Gaelic & Cornish gelvyer Kernewek for the translations. I have had far fewer hits with Welsh and Manx although I look towards Manx if I can't get any hits at all. Also I haven't been using Breton or Occitan, perhaps I will look a bit more at Breton. Many words are not appearing to be shared for example Seth does not correspond in Gaelic.
 
I 'll come agin to answer you but at first sight you gathered here a very messy storing of unrelated or poorly related concepts and false phonetical links, at first sight I repeat.
Which might be true but I'm just looking at the words themselves, anything further afield is beyond my knowledge. I mean Cath, Cathu is clearly related too Gaelic as is Tin. A whole vocabulary opens up with just Tin alone and it's all related to something hot. Even Seth with a simple meaning of arrow in Cornish is a bit obvious. I look forward to your answer
You could also say English, the Beautiful language we are conversing in is also a bit of a mess. Infact it wouldn't look all that different from Etruscan with words relating to one language without corresponding to another. There's no rules here, this wasn't a language that was forced too drop dialects as the case with Italian and French. If Hittite is an indo European language I can't see why Etruscan can't be, I haven't started on the word list but you will see a strong relation.

Quite a few are just farming related.
 
Etruscan word list.
To begin I'm going to touch on some Roman myths namely the founding of Rome.
Rome. Founded by Romulus and his Brother Remis.
Gaelic. Romhar, digging of ground. Roimh, hallowed burial place, where Nobles reside.
Gaelic. Reimeas, reign, sway of authority. Possible tied in with The Gaelic word king, Ri.
Gaelic. Ceadar, chief.
Etruscan. Fase, darkness.
Gaelic. Faise, emptiness, bareness.
Etruscan. Fanu, where the gods reside.
Gaelic. Fanu, dispersal, dwindlement, decline.
Etruscan. Luth, sacred place for gods.
Gaelic. Luth, power of movement, agility, activity, rigour.
Etruscan. Ceact, undetermined meaning something to do with Rath and huruspice.
Gaelic. Ceacht, lesson.
Etruscan. Truia, city of Troy.
Gaelic. Tru, doomed person. Trocha, untimely death.
Etruscan. Lein, to die.
Gaelic. Lean, follow.
Etruscan. Lauch, Luc, In charge , rule.
Gaelic. Lucht, content, charge, capacity.
Etruscan. Mal, watch, oversee observe, guard.
Gaelic. Mal, excise. Mal, prince, chief, noble.
Etruscan. Mun, underground place, tomb.
Gaelic. Mun, urinate. Manx. Mun, relation to stream.
Gaelic. Muin, teach, instruct. Muinte, well taught.
Mun could just mean stream or flowing water.
Etruscan. Mur, stay reside.
Gaelic. Mur, wall
Etruscan. Pes, land
Cornish. Pes, pray. Pes, paid
Etruscan. Purth, name of someone.
Cornish. Perth, thickets. Maybe someone from the thickets.
Etruscan. Cen, make, place.
Gaelic. Cen, how.
Etruscan. Hinth, hinthial, hinthial. Below, soul, Ghost.
Cornish. Hin, climate.
Etruscan. Hus, husur. Children.
Cornish. Hus. Magic, enchant, illusion, sorcery.
Etruscan. Tmia. Place, sacred building, temple.
Gaelic.Timire, attendant, Messenger.
Etruscan. Suth, Suthi, Sut. Stay, place, seat, tomb.
Gaelic. Suth, Suthi. Produce, progeny, foetus, embryo.
Etruscan. Cai, Cae. Caius, Gaius.
Gaelic. Cai, Caigh. Lament.
Etruscan. Aisiu, Aisna, Aisna. Divine, of the gods.
Gaelic. Aisig. Restore, Restitute.
Etruscan. Tev, too see.
Cornish, Tev, Grow.
Etruscan. Letham
Cornish. Leth, milk.
Etruscan. Arvus.
Cornish. Arves, fertile.
Etruscan. Restm. According to law, ritual.
Cornish. Rester/Restri. Arrangement, scheme. Restruns. Organisation. Restren. Document, file.
Etruscan. Ruva, brother.
Norweigan. Ruva, to be very tall (tower)
Cornish. Ruvanes, queen. Ruvaneth, kingdom.
Etruscan. Lasas.
Gaelic. Las. Light
Etruscan. Demiasa.
Cornish. Demedha. Marry.
Etruscan Itanim.
Gaelic. ?itainm. Place name.
Etruscan. clev/clevsin. Offering.
Cornish. Kleves, Ailment. Klevesi, infect.
 
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Etruscans, the founders, came from sardinia. The common folk were rasena when landing in the italian mainland.
The earliest Etruscan settlement was from Sardinia

I think you're a bit confused. The male line was from Central Europe and was R1b. Also, the Etruscan settlement on an island off the Sardinian coast was a trading post established by Etruscans from the mainland.

The papers are out there. Just search for them.
 
a bit of answer: I rewrite the Lynxbethetv words and write my comments in italics letters.
At first sight, there is nothing proving a genuine community of origin between these Celtic words and the proposed Etruscan words (when they are Etruscan).


Hello plebs.

Too begin with I have noticed some commonalities between Etruscan, Gaelic and the Brythonic languages. I have sourced Irish Gaelic, Welsh, Cornish and Manx to jail break this supposed hard to decipher language.
Good one linguists.



Moesan: It isn’t enough to notice some similarities in spellings and even in (supposed) pronounciation, we have to determine an homogenous system of correspondance between sounds transformations when these phonetic supposed links are not too evident, and sensible correspondances of significations between the words of the languages compared.
Plus I don’t know where you found the Etruscan meanings.

Too begin I'll start with the Etruscan gods and the name ras/rasna.
Etruscan. Ras/Rasna/Rasnna.
Manx. Rasyn, seed. Rassan, plant. Gaelic. Ros/Rois, flaxseed and Woods. Cornish. Ras, virtue.
Only some similarity in spelling, but of what use? You didn’t provide the meaning in Etruscan...


Etruscan. Tinn, the lighting god.
Gaelic.
Tinn, sore painful distressing. What semantic link?
Tintri, fiery hot tempered. OK
Tine, fire.OK (brythonic tan)
Tinntreacht, lightning. OK
That said, in Etruscan it’s the name of a god: could be a religous borrowing?

Latin, fulgar=lightning : Gaelic, Dart/Javelin= fogha.
The loss of a -l- compared to Latin isn’t a Gaelic feature of phonetic evolution – and you don’t provide an Etruscan equivalent.

Etruscan. Alpan, uncertain meaning. (!!!)
Gaelic. Alpan, Lump, chunk, chunky person. Could also be a designation for a big feature perhaps like the Alps mountain range.
The relation between English chunk, lump and highlands or mountain is very uncertain – here again we lack the meaning of alpan in Etruscan.

Etruscan. Achuvesr, unknown character mentioned along with Turan the war god.
Gaelic. Archu, fierce dog, war hound, warrior.
Same uncertainty of meaning in Etruscan + the loss of r in Etruscan not documented for I know (but?).

Etruscan. Calu, wolf god.
Gaelic. Ciallu, interpretation. Ciall which means sense sanity. I'm not certain with this one.
What link for meaning? By the way, modern ciall was surely *c[FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]ē[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]l[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]l[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif][/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]in ancient Irish and Gaelic (modern brythonic [/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]pwyll / pouell < [/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]celt. [/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]**cw[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]ē[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]lla[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]).[/FONT]

Etruscan. Cathu & Cath.
Gaelic. Cathu, Cathaigh, Cath, Cathaigh,battle & fight, warlike. Bit surprised this one slipped through as Cath in the form of Catholic, Cathar, Katherine or even Caithcart (surname) feature as present.
No link between Gaelic/Irish cath (brythonic cad, kad < *cat-) and the diverse Catholic, Cathar, Katherine < Greek kataros : pure, pure heart – ereagain we lack the meaning of the Etruscan!



Etruscan. Cel, Goddess of the earth.
Gaelic, Coill, Woods forest. Ceil, conceal suppress.
Manx. Keyll, Forest.
Cornish. Koos, Forest.
Welsh. Cel, Concealment.
Cel clearly means forest and the root word for conceal comes from Forest. I'd imagine the original term for the Celts corresponds with Forest Clan's/People or Celsclan.
Irish/Gaelic coll/coill forms are associated to diverse meanings: wood, hazel(tree / wood) cf Brythonicscelwydd, kelvez (hazel tree)& loss cf Brythonics coll, koll +... the Brythonics coed, koad, koos (cos) with only wood are surely < *k[FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]ē[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]t [/FONT]
Irish ceil / cel, as Welsh cel > V. celu are diferent, to compare with Latin celo, celare > French celer, receler – you put here a lot of different meanings, without evident semantic link with Etruscan .

Etruscan. Horta, Horticulture. Wikipedia says it's it's highly conjectural. Gaelic. Gort, field, cultivated field.
What you put here as Etruscan (???) seems just Latin. It’s an I-E root which gave also garth, garzh (hedge) in modern Brythonics, garden, gaard, g[FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]å[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]rd[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif] [/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]in Germanic >[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif] gardin > jardin[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif] in French and[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif] grad, gorod, hrad[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif] in Slavic - [/FONT]
 
a bit of answer: I rewrite the Lynxbethetv words and write my comments in italics letters.
At first sight, there is nothing proving a genuine community of origin between these Celtic words and the proposed Etruscan words (when they are Etruscan).

Hello plebs.
Too begin with I have noticed some commonalities between Etruscan, Gaelic and the Brythonic languages. I have sourced Irish Gaelic, Welsh, Cornish and Manx to jail break this supposed hard to decipher language.
Good one linguists.
Moesan: It isn’t enough to notice some similarities in spellings and even in (supposed) pronounciation, we have to determine an homogenous system of correspondance between sounds transformations when these phonetic supposed links are not too evident, and sensible correspondances of significations between the words of the languages compared.
Plus I don’t know where you found the Etruscan meanings.
Too begin I'll start with the Etruscan gods and the name ras/rasna.
Etruscan. Ras/Rasna/Rasnna.
Manx. Rasyn, seed. Rassan, plant. Gaelic. Ros/Rois, flaxseed and Woods. Cornish. Ras, virtue.
Only some similarity in spelling, but of what use? You didn’t provide the meaning in Etruscan...
Etruscan. Tinn, the lighting god.
Gaelic.
Tinn, sore painful distressing. What semantic link?
Tintri, fiery hot tempered. OK
Tine, fire.OK (brythonic tan)
Tinntreacht, lightning. OK
That said, in Etruscan it’s the name of a god: could be a religous borrowing?
Latin, fulgar=lightning : Gaelic, Dart/Javelin= fogha.
The loss of a -l- compared to Latin isn’t a Gaelic feature of phonetic evolution – and you don’t provide an Etruscan equivalent.
Etruscan. Alpan, uncertain meaning. (!!!)
Gaelic. Alpan, Lump, chunk, chunky person. Could also be a designation for a big feature perhaps like the Alps mountain range.
The relation between English chunk, lump and highlands or mountain is very uncertain – here again we lack the meaning of alpan in Etruscan.
Etruscan. Achuvesr, unknown character mentioned along with Turan the war god.
Gaelic. Archu, fierce dog, war hound, warrior.
Same uncertainty of meaning in Etruscan + the loss of r in Etruscan not documented for I know (but?).
Etruscan. Calu, wolf god.
Gaelic. Ciallu, interpretation. Ciall which means sense sanity. I'm not certain with this one.
What link for meaning? By the way, modern ciall was surely *c[FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]ē[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]l[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]l[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif][/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]in ancient Irish and Gaelic (modern brythonic [/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]pwyll / pouell < [/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]celt. [/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]**cw[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]ē[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]lla[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]).[/FONT]
Etruscan. Cathu & Cath.
Gaelic. Cathu, Cathaigh, Cath, Cathaigh,battle & fight, warlike. Bit surprised this one slipped through as Cath in the form of Catholic, Cathar, Katherine or even Caithcart (surname) feature as present.
No link between Gaelic/Irish cath (brythonic cad, kad < *cat-) and the diverse Catholic, Cathar, Katherine < Greek kataros : pure, pure heart – ereagain we lack the meaning of the Etruscan!
Etruscan. Cel, Goddess of the earth.
Gaelic, Coill, Woods forest. Ceil, conceal suppress.
Manx. Keyll, Forest.
Cornish. Koos, Forest.
Welsh. Cel, Concealment.
Cel clearly means forest and the root word for conceal comes from Forest. I'd imagine the original term for the Celts corresponds with Forest Clan's/People or Celsclan.
Irish/Gaelic coll/coill forms are associated to diverse meanings: wood, hazel(tree / wood) cf Brythonicscelwydd, kelvez (hazel tree)& loss cf Brythonics coll, koll +... the Brythonics coed, koad, koos (cos) with only wood are surely < *k[FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]ē[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]t [/FONT]
Irish ceil / cel, as Welsh cel > V. celu are diferent, to compare with Latin celo, celare > French celer, receler – you put here a lot of different meanings, without evident semantic link with Etruscan .
Etruscan. Horta, Horticulture. Wikipedia says it's it's highly conjectural. Gaelic. Gort, field, cultivated field.
What you put here as Etruscan (???) seems just Latin. It’s an I-E root which gave also garth, garzh (hedge) in modern Brythonics, garden, gaard, g[FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]å[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]rd[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif] [/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif]in Germanic >[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif] gardin > jardin[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif] in French and[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif] grad, gorod, hrad[/FONT][FONT=Liberation Serif, serif] in Slavic - [/FONT]
From an academic view I see your point but we are also talking about a language that has stumped academia so why not jailbreak it. I've made a list of matching words that alone should be enough too raise some suspicion. From my perspective we have an R1B people surrounded by IE speakers who in all likelihood were the founders of Rome but they spoke a Neolithic language, I believe that too be incorrect. Also the usage of Cath is more it exists in our vocabulary already. It can't be a coincidence that an Etruscan deity just so happens to carry the name of the Gaelic word for battle.
I'm using the "Etruscan world list" and that's where the supposed meanings of those words are, again it's just guess work by linguists, they don't know. Alpan has no meaning in Etruscan but it does pop up in Gaelic and also Hittite, could be a clue.
Take for example Tevarath, it has no determined meaning and while I can't find an exact spelling in either Gaelic of Cornish I can find a family of words.
Etruscan. Tevarath, undetermined meaning.
Cornish. Tevasieges, Adult. Tevesigieth, Adulthood. Tevi, grow. Tevyans, Growth. Tevyer, grower. Now we can see there's no exact translation but maybe it's tev" it has something do with growth.
Etruscan. Methlum. Locality.
Cornish. Amethva, big farm. Amethva, farm. Amethyans, arable farming.
Etruscan. Tages, founding prophet of Etruscan religion.
Cornish. Tioges, farmer or farmer's wife.

Too say again the Etruscan meanings are speculations at best ie they have translated the words and guessed at the meanings depending on how many times they appear, the art they are in or the statue that bears it's name. Unless it's mentioned what that exact role is it's all guess work even cathu is just some wild speculation by academia. Unless I recall incorrectly the link between a wolf god and calu is his wolf like appearance and pelt hat.
 
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comparing lexicons to search some common origins implies to gather words which present some community of phonetic correspondance joined to some community of meanings. Surely we may expect some slippages in meanings and some phonetic changes, but then these changes have to present some regularity to guarantee first suspicions of some reality.
some basic few rules are useful at last for Celtic dialects which already differ one of another.
eg: gaelic f- could be sometimes for ancient w-, the most of genuine Celtic roots in kw- became p- in Brythonic when s- became h- and so on... Comparisons between ancient and new languages requires some solid bases. When comparing plurisyllavic words, we have to keep in mind that some of apparent pairs are in fact the fruit of hazard, linking words which are not broken in the same way (eg: # cam-ap > < ca-map - # =not true roots but imaginary examples) -
if anybody has the "compulsery" need to prove some links between tongues vocabularies he finds "proofs"! Too often this had occurred in this forum and in others, even in some academic worksrecently.
 
comparing lexicons to search some common origins implies to gather words which present some community of phonetic correspondance joined to some community of meanings. Surely we may expect some slippages in meanings and some phonetic changes, but then these changes have to present some regularity to guarantee first suspicions of some reality.
some basic few rules are useful at last for Celtic dialects which already differ one of another.
eg: gaelic f- could be sometimes for ancient w-, the most of genuine Celtic roots in kw- became p- in Brythonic when s- became h- and so on... Comparisons between ancient and new languages requires some solid bases. When comparing plurisyllavic words, we have to keep in mind that some of apparent pairs are in fact the fruit of hazard, linking words which are not broken in the same way (eg: # cam-ap > < ca-map - # =not true roots but imaginary examples) -
if anybody has the "compulsery" need to prove some links between tongues vocabularies he finds "proofs"! Too often this had occurred in this forum and in others, even in some academic worksrecently.
Are these even rules or just pronunciations that have have been confused as rules. According to linguists Etruscan falatu means "Sky" but in Gaelic" Fala" means grudge, resentment, feud and "tu" means you. Are the linguists correct or is "falatu" supposed to be "Fala tu." Gaelic has been quite isolated it didn't slowly adopt another language it was completely dropped for english but what we have is a full dictionary perhaps it does retain some older elements, same goes for Brythonic languages. Take Turms, Wikipedia states it's one of these bonafide Etruscan words but then why does the word pop up in Welsh...Turms in an underworld figure that delivers souls and Turms in Welsh relates to dead cavalrymen, coincidence ? Sounds like Turms was a horseman who delivered the dead. Even the titans, the gods who were overthrown, perhaps the root of titan is seen in Gaelic as "tit" which means fall.
What I need.to see is Etruscan stellaes with no supposed translations just Latin script.
Sometimes the proof is in the pudding.
 
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If I recall not all the Etruscans were R1b. How do we know the samples were not just a minority of Etruscans among a larger set of Latins. I was under the impression the Etruscan were outnumbered by the commoner Latins who eventually took over. I could be wrong here though. Etruscans scream of J2b-L283 or G2a at least.
 
If I recall not all the Etruscans were R1b. How do we know the samples were not just a minority of Etruscans among a larger set of Latins. I was under the impression the Etruscan were outnumbered by the commoner Latins who eventually took over. I could be wrong here though. Etruscans scream of J2b-L283 or G2a at least.
I'll just double check but isn't R1B the most common haplogroup in Tuscany. Your correct we don't know if the R1B is a minority. The more recent finding suggesting the Roman Empire became majority Anatolian during the imperium then magically returned to the Republican Italic ethnicity is quite interesting although it doesn't make sense unless the locals commited mass ethnic cleansing so perhaps the DNA findings don't always tell the whole story.

What screams J2 or G about the Etruscans ?
 

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