Etruscan possibly Gaelic + Brythonic.

In regard to the origins of the Etruscans being from Anatolia is there a possibility that it's the other way around and the IE speakers were actually Rasenna who settled the coast and later moved inland. A curiosity is that Ness means headland in Scots Gaelic and the Hittites did call themselves Neshians or Nesh.

A slight out there theory of course.
 
Florence/Firenze originally started as an Etruscan settlement now in Gaelic Fioruisce means spring water.

A bit of a stretch but Florence does have its springs. It does make me think fufluns has something to do with water.
 
Etruscan city caisra.

Gaelic. Caise, stream current. Cais, hatred spite. Perhaps angry/turbulent waters.
 
The above video is a pretty Irish lass speaking Gaelic. Perhaps that's how Etruscan sounded. Ive mainly been using teanglann for Gaelic & Cornish gelvyer Kernewek for the translations. I have had far fewer hits with Welsh and Manx although I look towards Manx if I can't get any hits at all. Also I haven't been using Breton or Occitan, perhaps I will look a bit more at Breton. Many words are not appearing to be shared for example Seth does not correspond in Gaelic.
I did not listen to it before. I would guess it's rather Scottish Gaelic (Erse) and not Irish (too much sounds like french 'eu', too guttural?), and the name is the equivalent of male MacLeod, rather a Scottish name. Maybe I'm wrong?
 
I did not listen to it before. I would guess it's rather Scottish Gaelic (Erse) and not Irish (too much sounds like french 'eu', too guttural?), and the name is the equivalent of male MacLeod, rather a Scottish name. Maybe I'm wrong?

She's def speaking Irish Gaelic but there are other clips featuring different speakers from other regions of Ireland that don't have the French ring too it that this girl has.

I think she married a Scot.
 
She's def speaking Irish Gaelic but there are other clips featuring different speakers from other regions of Ireland that don't have the French ring too it that this girl has.

I think she married a Scot.
Maybe Donegal dialect or something close?
 
Florence/Firenze originally started as an Etruscan settlement now in Gaelic Fioruisce means spring water.

A bit of a stretch but Florence does have its springs. It does make me think fufluns has something to do with water.

Florence/Firenze is a name of Latin origin from the Latin Florentia, Florentia is an auspicious name like Piacentia, Valentia and many others, a tradition established in Roman times. If there is a connection with Gaelic it is with Latin, and nothing strange if the Italo-Celtic theory is true.

Remains from the Villanovan period have been indeed found in Florence, but the Etruscan settlement was in the hills north of Florence, on the road to Bologna, a city of Etruscan foundation, and in Etruscan this ancient town was called Vipsul/Visul and corresponds to what is now known as Fiesole.
 
In regard to the origins of the Etruscans being from Anatolia is there a possibility that it's the other way around and the IE speakers were actually Rasenna who settled the coast and later moved inland. A curiosity is that Ness means headland in Scots Gaelic and the Hittites did call themselves Neshians or Nesh.

A slight out there theory of course.

The theory of the Anatolian origin of the Etruscans is not believed credible since years by any of the specialists in Etruscan civilisation, nor it is compatible with the genetic data. The Steppe component in the Etruscans did not originate from Anatolia but from Central Europe where R1b P312, R1b U152 and so on were formed, presumably during the Bell Beaker.

If it is true that Scots Gaelic and the Hittites did call themselves Neshians or Nesh - I take this at face value without verifying it - it is because they are both Indo-European languages, the connection being in the Indo-European language family eventually, even though we know that Anatolian was the first to be formed and did not originate from the Steppes, while Gaelic did.


Etruscan city caisra.

Gaelic. Caise, stream current. Cais, hatred spite. Perhaps angry/turbulent waters.


Caisra or Cisra is the Etruscan name for Cerveteri, the Latin name Caere, an Etruscan city today in the northern province of Rome. I do not think its etymological meaning is known.
 
The name "Neshian" used for the Hittites comes from the Central Anatolian city of Nesha, also known as Kanesh, the archaeological site of Kultepe.
 
Fufluns.

I can't find it in Gaelic but Fuif in Dutch means party, celebration etc etc. looks like Fufluns was the god of celebration. Fuif/Feast have obvious links.

Now Lun in Scots Gaelic means Monday how that fits I'm sure.

Perhaps Etruscan was one thing in-between Gaelic and a Germanic dialect.

Turms in German just means tower. Direct modern translation.
 
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The theory of the Anatolian origin of the Etruscans is not believed credible since years by any of the specialists in Etruscan civilisation, nor it is compatible with the genetic data. The Steppe component in the Etruscans did not originate from Anatolia but from Central Europe where R1b P312, R1b U152 and so on were formed, presumably during the Bell Beaker.

If it is true that Scots Gaelic and the Hittites did call themselves Neshians or Nesh - I take this at face value without verifying it - it is because they are both Indo-European languages, the connection being in the Indo-European language family eventually, even though we know that Anatolian was the first to be formed and did not originate from the Steppes, while Gaelic did.





Caisra or Cisra is the Etruscan name for Cerveteri, the Latin name Caere, an Etruscan city today in the northern province of Rome. I do not think its etymological meaning is known.
cais (hatred) correspond to the Brittonic cas/kas - cais is a grammatical (genitive?) form of cas in Gaelic -no link with Etruscan -
 
Fufluns.

I can't find it in Gaelic but Fuif in Dutch means party, celebration etc etc. looks like Fufluns was the god of celebration. Fuif/Feast have obvious links.

Now Lun in Scots Gaelic means Monday how that fits I'm sure.

Perhaps Etruscan was one thing in-between Gaelic and a Germanic dialect.

Turms in German just means tower. Direct modern translation.
lun in Celtic languages is a borrowing to Latin - This kind of comparisons you do is not a method to study relations between languages, no offense.
 
Etruscans are likely a Rhaetic people with Basque-like R1b founder effects; their ancestors assimilated the first U152 explorers from north of the Alps. The Indo-European influence would be more cultural and patrilineal than linguistic.
 
Etruscans are likely a Rhaetic people with Basque-like R1b founder effects; their ancestors assimilated the first U152 explorers from north of the Alps. The Indo-European influence would be more cultural and patrilineal than linguistic.

It is plausible what you write, besides cultural and patrilineal (Etruscan society is patriarchal like those of Indo-European languages, despite a greater empowerment of women), there is also an Indo-European influence in the Etruscan language (besides the fact that probably during the Bronze Age at least one IE language was spoken in Etruria besides the ancestor of Etruscan/Rhaetian), so much so that initially some linguists, such as Devoto, proposed the term Peri-Indo-European for Etruscan (from the ancient Greek περί perí, "about, around"), or even Kretschmer thought it was Proto-Indo-European, or rather a relic of a Proto-Indo-European phase, from which it would have evolved in a parallel and independent way from the classical Indo-European languages. Today scholars agree that it is a non-Indo-European language with Indo-European influences.
 
lun in Celtic languages is a borrowing to Latin - This kind of comparisons you do is not a method to study relations between languages, no offense.
That's ok my way is more unconventional but its because I'm not as educated on the subject as others.

In some ways doesn't my theory wrap up Fufluns IE if Fuif is feast or celebration in Germanic and Lun is moon in Latin does the etymology not fit isn't he just a moon god. Turms is also allegedly just an Etruscan term but it fits like a glove in modern languages.
 
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It is plausible what you write, besides cultural and patrilineal (Etruscan society is patriarchal like those of Indo-European languages, despite a greater empowerment of women), there is also an Indo-European influence in the Etruscan language (besides the fact that probably during the Bronze Age at least one IE language was spoken in Etruria besides the ancestor of Etruscan/Rhaetian), so much so that initially some linguists, such as Devoto, proposed the term Peri-Indo-European for Etruscan (from the ancient Greek περί perí, "about, around"), or even Kretschmer thought it was Proto-Indo-European, or rather a relic of a Proto-Indo-European phase, from which it would have evolved in a parallel and independent way from the classical Indo-European languages. Today scholars agree that it is a non-Indo-European language with Indo-European influences.

Then why are the gods Indo European. Surely Catha is a dead set giveaway, how could they missed this. Did they even look ? Isn't Cel another odd alignment or perhaps Laran who's the god of war which does correspond to Scots Gaelic. Larach/Larachean, site, ruin, impression, scar.The studies have been conducted well before anyone knew what a haplogroup was it seems to me they just didn't look because they had no reason too.

Maybe it's an Indo European language with non Indo European influences. Some of those Etruscans were haplogroup G so that there could be the influence.
 
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Aulus Gellius mentioned Etruscan alongside Gaulish in anecdote. I can't find the original script though what exactly did he say...
 

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