Interesting Maps and Graphs

Aside from his breakfast, the low protein levels of lunch and dinner surprise me.
I get that he probably has the munchies at night, but how about some fish?

Is this his diet when training and competing? It has to be, or he'd weigh 350 pounds.

My daughter swam competitively from the time she was a child, and before a meet all the swimmers were told to go "carb heavy". We used to have "pasta parties" for the team before the meets.

Maybe it also has to do with the fact that it takes so long to digest protein, so he eats it in the morning, and it gives continuous energy throughout the day?
 
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Clear and concise map of migrations into Europe from Razib Khan's subtrack.
 
Is this his diet when training and competing? It has to be, or he'd weigh 350 pounds.

My daughter swam competitively from the time she was a child, and before a meet all the swimmers were told to go "carb heavy". We used to have "pasta parties" for the team before the meets.

Maybe it also has to do with the fact that it takes so long to digest protein, so he eats it in the morning, and it gives continuous energy throughout the day?
I'm truly wondering what if anything is left out; such as protein shakes.
 
How many Europeans identify themselves only by nationality, by nationality and then as Europeans, as Europeans and then by nationality, or just as Europeans, from the Spring 2015 Eurobarometer report.

Europeans.jpg
 
From Special Eurobarometer 508 - Values and Identities of EU citizens / October-November 2020

"Identity related to ethnic or racial background"
"Six in ten EU citizens identify with their ethnic or racial background.
Across the EU, 61% of respondents say they identify with their ethnic or racial background, 21% are noncommittal, while 16% say they do not identify with their ethnic or racial background.
Between the different Member States, some differences can be noted.
More than eight in ten respondents in Portugal (87%), Bulgaria (84%), Cyprus (83%) and Slovakia (80%) say they identify
with their ethnic or racial background.
On the contrary, less than four in ten respondents say they identify with their ethnic or racial background in Luxembourg (29%), Sweden (33%), Estonia and Belgium (both 38%) and France (39%)."

I'm surprised by Portugal's position on the list.

Ethnic_Identity.jpg
 
I was going to be ****ed off for the whole day if Italy got Sweden like numbers.
 
When I was in Europe, I met many Brits and heard lines like "This is my first time in Europe" from some of them, so I figured they don't for the most part consider themselves European at all.
 
The cylindrical map projection developed by Gerardus Mercator in the 16th century does not accurately represent the true size of countries or continents. The Mercator projection distorts the sizes and shapes of landmasses as it stretches areas away from the equator. As a result, countries near the poles appear significantly larger than they actually are, while those closer to the equator appear smaller. For example, on the Mercator projection, Greenland appears larger than Africa, while in reality, Africa is about 14 times larger than Greenland. This distortion occurs because the Mercator projection preserves angles and shapes but sacrifices accurate size representation.

This animated map shows the true size of each country :
https://www.openculture.com/2019/04/animated-maps-animated-maps-reveal-the-true-size-of-countries-the-true-size-of-countries.html

This site allows you to choose one or more countries, drag them to the equator and check their real size :
https://www.thetruesize.com
 
How many Europeans identify themselves only by nationality, by nationality and then as Europeans, as Europeans and then by nationality, or just as Europeans, from the Spring 2015 Eurobarometer report.

View attachment 13891


Interesting map! You can easily find the founding EEC members.....(Germany, France, Benelux, Italy)

To me an general European identity can as such go well with the during importance of a nation state.

I once has a great-uncle who went in the fifties to Australia, when he returned once in the nineties he was more Dutch than the Dutch (frozen in the fifties) ;)
 
Interesting map! You can easily find the founding EEC members.....(Germany, France, Benelux, Italy)

To me an general European identity can as such go well with the during importance of a nation state.

I once has a great-uncle who went in the fifties to Australia, when he returned once in the nineties he was more Dutch than the Dutch (frozen in the fifties) ;)

I have noticed that immigrants in countries like Canada also strongly retain their ethnic roots too.

My mother is more advanced than my father. But my father is basically frozen as an Italian immigrant in the 1970s.


In the USA, there's more of a social process of immigrants becoming assimilated to the culture of the United States. While that is socially engineered by the state to an extent, I think some people also adopt it because they may actually prefer it in some cases. Though there are also some people that feel more drawn to their ethnic identity.


I feel I try to maintain my ethnic identity, as well as adapting and assimilating to the culture of the United States. Because life is nuanced, and one can appreciate and understand the cultures and ways of both. I see no reason not to. Then again, maybe one needs to be more of an abstract thinker to have the appreciation, I guess. Maybe it is too much to juggle mentally for some?


Soon I can endeavor to apply for Italian-citizenship. I could have done it through my parents, but my wife is an Italian citizen, so I will just do it through her. Our child also has Italian citizenship, and U.S. citizenship.


Though, I remember telling my old boss about the fact that I was doing this, and she couldn't understand why. She was a real concrete thinker...
 
I have noticed that immigrants in countries like Canada also strongly retain their ethnic roots too.

My mother is more advanced than my father. But my father is basically frozen as an Italian immigrant in the 1970s.


In the USA, there's more of a social process of immigrants becoming assimilated to the culture of the United States. While that is socially engineered by the state to an extent, I think some people also adopt it because they may actually prefer it in some cases. Though there are also some people that feel more drawn to their ethnic identity.


I feel I try to maintain my ethnic identity, as well as adapting and assimilating to the culture of the United States. Because life is nuanced, and one can appreciate and understand the cultures and ways of both. I see no reason not to. Then again, maybe one needs to be more of an abstract thinker to have the appreciation, I guess. Maybe it is too much to juggle mentally for some?


Soon I can endeavor to apply for Italian-citizenship. I could have done it through my parents, but my wife is an Italian citizen, so I will just do it through her. Our child also has Italian citizenship, and U.S. citizenship.


Though, I remember telling my old boss about the fact that I was doing this, and she couldn't understand why. She was a real concrete thinker...

I don't know if you have to be an abstract thinker per se to hold on to your (ambigu) identity. For the first generation, born in the country of origin, I can still imagine it. But for subsequent generations?

Have they not definitively lost the connection with the identity of the mother country of the previous generations? After all, it is not kept in granite... My great-uncle himself had already lost connection, let alone his children. Isn't it more than a romantic little glorified memory? A kind of lost arcadia?

In my case, it only leads to discussions with my father-in-law, an inveterate Frenchman. He is from the 1968 generation but he would prefer his granddaughter to acquire French nationality.... I don't understand that, on the one hand wanting to be a citizen of the world, but on the other hand striving for a grandchild - born in the most Northern corner of the Netherlands - that she will get a French passport? Incidentally, a basic knowledge of the French language and culture is never lost! No doubt!

Incidentally, until about twenty years ago, many Dutch people thought that they are international and do not have such a strong identity of their own. That was changed afterwards.

I myself don't think I'm that nationalistic, maybe more of a kind of European North Sea regionalist ;) Nevertheless in the end I'm a typical cheesehead too...I guess. The Netherlands does have one of the oldest national identities in Europe. The national anthem was already written in 1572 at the beginning of the liberation war against Spanish Habsburg.... And ask the neighbors, Belgians or Germans if the Dutch distinguish themselves from them and you usually get a whole story.....
 
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I don't know if you have to be an abstract thinker per se to hold on to your (ambigu) identity. For the first generation, born in the country of origin, I can still imagine it. But for subsequent generations?

Have they not definitively lost the connection with the identity of the mother country of the previous generations? After all, it is not kept in granite... My great-uncle himself had already lost connection, let alone his children. Isn't it more than a romantic little glorified memory? A kind of lost arcadia?

In my case, it only leads to discussions with my father-in-law, an inveterate Frenchman. He is from the 1968 generation and on the other hand, he would prefer his granddaughter to acquire French nationality.... I don't understand that, on the one hand wanting to be a citizen of the world, but on the other hand striving for a grandchild - born in the most Northern corner of the Netherlands - that she will get a French passport? Incidentally, a basic knowledge of the French language and culture is never lost! No doubt!

Incidentally, until about twenty years ago, many Dutch people thought that they are international and do not have such a strong identity of their own. That was changed afterwards.

I myself don't think I'm that nationalistic, maybe more of a kind of European North Sea regionalist ;) Nevertheless in the end I'm a typical cheesehead too...I guess. The Netherlands does have one of the oldest national identities in Europe. The national anthem was already written in 1572 at the beginning of the liberation war against Spanish Habsburg.... And ask the neighbors, Belgians or Germans if the Dutch distinguish themselves from them and you usually get a whole story.....

I don't know, we plan on going to Italy again in the future, but also traveling to other places. She's already been there, (as well as Greece, Turkey, and soon Japan and South Korea) we are teaching her Italian. But also Spanish, and French.
 
Europe most visited historic houses (castles, palaces, manors,…) , based on the number of reviews on TripAdvisor.
On the site there is also a map of other historic houses that, although they do not receive as many visitors, are true hidden gems.

https://moverdb.com/historic-houses-europe/

Most_Visited.jpg
 
Mobile data prices in the World.
In Europe the most expensives countries are Greece with 5.29€ per 1 GB of mobile data, Finland with 6€ and Switzerland with 7.36€.
The US with 5.61€ and Canada with 5.93€ are also expensive.

The site with the interactive map is in portuguese, but the language can be changed.
In Edge and Chrome, right mouse button, “Translate to English”.
With Firefox is necessary an add-on to make the translation.

https://hellosafe.pt/telecomunicacoes/dados-moveis-portugal

1GB_Price.jpg
 

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