Vlach haplogroups & deep ancestry?

@Litovoi

The k-g shif and L-vocalization are also features of Albanian.

Also, check the case of Ganga, a traditional type of singing in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Dalmatia, Lika and Montenegro derived from Albanian "kanga" (song).
 
When I read the word calator and its meaning I immediately thought of "calle" in Spanish which means "street".
Yes,but it helps only in finding the etymology of kjelatori,there's no need to involve Komani-Kruje here,because those Vlachs were performing lots of military activities, even if some of them may have guarded the roads as well.
These kjelatori from the Serbian Kingdom made long-distance trading using caravans,some of them are recorded along the Dalmatian coast,while their military roles too connects them with the frontier zone.
That calatori was a special Vlach category clearly comes from the Greek translation, hoditai,applied to those frontier men from the Bulgarian side,with unsure status,thoughts and even affiliation, that have killed their leader,David,in his own domain,along the Prespa-Kastoria area.

https://books.google.ro/books?id=KH...#v=onepage&q=vlachs molested ottomans&f=false

https://books.google.ro/books?id=YI...#v=onepage&q=vlachs unfaithful cumans&f=false
 
Yes,but it helps only in finding the etymology of kjelatori,there's no need to involve Komani-Kruje here,because those Vlachs were performing lots of military activities, even if some of them may have guarded the roads as well.
These kjelatori from the Serbian Kingdom made long-distance trading using caravans,some of them are recorded along the Dalmatian coast,while their military roles too connects them with the frontier zone.
That calatori was a special Vlach category clearly comes from the Greek translation, hoditai,applied to those frontier men from the Bulgarian side,with unsure status,thoughts and even affiliation, that have killed their leader,David,in his own domain,along the Prespa-Kastoria area.

https://books.google.ro/books?id=KH...#v=onepage&q=vlachs molested ottomans&f=false

https://books.google.ro/books?id=YI...#v=onepage&q=vlachs unfaithful cumans&f=false
I didn't mention anything about Komani-Kruje. Just pointed out that the Latin word didn't just survive in Romanian.
 
Romanian language is not same with Aromanian.
Aromanian might be a dialect of Romanian language.
However,on all land of Romania there is spoken only one language, Romanian, there are no dialects.
Romanian language,unlike Aromanian, has around 25% of the words cognates to Slavic languages.
2.7% of Romanian words are cognates to West Germanic languages.
This is a clear proof that Romanians as a people and Romanian language formed on current land of Romania,after Slavic migrations and Romanians did not came from South of Danube.
2.7% of the words cognates to West Germanic languages can be explained only by the contact that the Dacians had with West Germanic speakers.
And West Germanic speakers were never present South of Danube.
Want example of Romanian basic words cognates to West Germanic words?
Meshter in Romanian, same meaning with Meister from German.
Treapta, a step from a stair, from Treppe (stair) in West German.
Compair to trepte ,plural of treapta.

And so on.

Romanians also have R1b-U106,fewer or more,they also have lots of Eastern European admixture and 20-30% NW European admixture.


Another clear example that Romanians were in Romania,and not South of Danube, when the Slavs came:
In the areas of Romania that were not under Roman Empire occupation, snow is called "zapada".
This is cognate to Slavic zapadati, which means snow falling.
In the areas of Romania that were occupied by Roman Empire, snow is called Nea.
In Aromanian language,snow is also called Nea.
Which shows that actually, Zapada comes from the Dacian language, not from Slavic and that Dacians language had some cognates to Balto-Slavic/ProtoSlavic languages.
Because all Slavic speakers took a Germanic cognate for Snow now,calling either snjeg or other variants.

Also, Romanian folk language has the word Doina, which is a song of melancholy,or so, cognate to Lithuanian Daina.
Daina in Lithuanian means a song.
Slavs do not have this word.
This is again,a word from Dacian language,that was kept in Romanian.

Another word that shows Romanian language formed on current land of Romania:
In Romanian,we call neck "gat" cognate to Slavic glutu.
In Aromanian, gat is called "gusa" from latin geusiae.
This is a word from basic words,so it cannot be borrowed from Slavic,but it is inherited from Dacian and was kept.
A lot of Romanian words from basic language are cognates to Romance languages.

So Aromanian language formed South of Danube .
And Romanian language formed North of Danube.
 
Romanian language is not same with Aromanian.
Aromanian might be a dialect of Romanian language.
However,on all land of Romania there is spoken only one language, Romanian, there are no dialects.
Romanian language,unlike Aromanian, has around 25% of the words cognates to Slavic languages.
2.7% of Romanian words are cognates to West Germanic languages.
This is a clear proof that Romanians as a people and Romanian language formed on current land of Romania,after Slavic migrations and Romanians did not came from South of Danube.
2.7% of the words cognates to West Germanic languages can be explained only by the contact that the Dacians had with West Germanic speakers.
And West Germanic speakers were never present South of Danube.
Want example of Romanian basic words cognates to West Germanic words?
Meshter in Romanian, same meaning with Meister from German.
Treapta, a step from a stair, from Treppe (stair) in West German.
Compair to trepte ,plural of treapta.

And so on.

Romanians also have R1b-U106,fewer or more,they also have lots of Eastern European admixture and 20-30% NW European admixture.


Another clear example that Romanians were in Romania,and not South of Danube, when the Slavs came:
In the areas of Romania that were not under Roman Empire occupation, snow is called "zapada".
This is cognate to Slavic zapadati, which means snow falling.
In the areas of Romania that were occupied by Roman Empire, snow is called Nea.
In Aromanian language,snow is also called Nea.
Which shows that actually, Zapada comes from the Dacian language, not from Slavic and that Dacians language had some cognates to Balto-Slavic/ProtoSlavic languages.
Because all Slavic speakers took a Germanic cognate for Snow now,calling either snjeg or other variants.

Also, Romanian folk language has the word Doina, which is a song of melancholy,or so, cognate to Lithuanian Daina.
Daina in Lithuanian means a song.
Slavs do not have this word.
This is again,a word from Dacian language,that was kept in Romanian.

Another word that shows Romanian language formed on current land of Romania:
In Romanian,we call neck "gat" cognate to Slavic glutu.
In Aromanian, gat is called "gusa" from latin geusiae.
This is a word from basic words,so it cannot be borrowed from Slavic,but it is inherited from Dacian and was kept.
A lot of Romanian words from basic language are cognates to Romance languages.

So Aromanian language formed South of Danube .
And Romanian language formed North of Danube.

that is interesting
 
Let's solve this unknown etymology ,since it's definitely not a hard one:
copil,a child,comes 100% from Latin copulo,copulare.
In Albanian,this word is a borrowing, because the original meaning, a bastard,is preserved,while the further development of the Romanian sense implies its use as a slang,common to the urban speech.
Phonetics doesn't cause too many problems either,we do have Romyliana,instead of Romuliana,in the Procopius' list.
The Romanian,Spanish and Catalan term for the male sexual organ underwent a similar development,because it's coming from chicken.
https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/copulare#Italian
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Procopius/Buildings/4B*.html
 
If there would be no dialects in Rumanian like Mihaitzateo posted, would that be not the proof the language was already formed when ut came to the Rumanian lands? But I heard from oltenian dialect and moldovan dialect, muntenian dialect etc. I also think the west german borrowings are relativly recent, maybe from the so called saxons ( who in reality are bayuwars from Austria and suebs from the black forest region in Germany. They were settled in Transylvania which in German has the name Siebenbürgen (7castles or fortresses) from the hungarian King and Austrian Emperor.

Gesendet von meinem SM-G903F mit Tapatalk
 
One of the main principles in linguistics is that the central areas will go innovative,while the peripheral ones,conservative,this is also the case for Latin,with Romanian and Spanish, sharing terms that have become archaic in
Italian and French.
These specificities reject the idea of a Italian-Romanian proximity, strengthen by the fact that Dalmatian goes with the innovations (bellus,plus,mittere,against dies).
https://ro.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limba_spaniolă
 
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The Castelmezzano dialect eventually becomes peripheral, conservative,in southern Italy, given the geography and weaker contacts with the Latin speakers from the Balkans,another important fact is that this area doesn't overlap with Arbereshe,so a supposed influence can be excluded.
http://www.familyholiday.net/the-most-romantic-small-town-in-italy-castelmezzano/
https://ecobnb.com/blog/2014/07/basilicata-100-per-hour-flying-clouds/

My parental grandparents are from one of the Castelmezzano dialect speaking villages.

Little vocabulary this is an expression that they say for tomorrow, the day after, the day after that and repeated for an additional two days

Crei, Pescrei, Pescrile, Mingrile e Mingrotte
 
Vlach haplogroups & deep ancestry?

My parental grandparents are from one of the Castelmezzano dialect speaking villages.

Little vocabulary this is an expression that they say for tomorrow, the day after, the day after that and repeated for an additional two days

Crei, Pescrei, Pescrile, Mingrile e Mingrotte

At About 100 Km Southeast from Castelmazzano, in most dialects:
Crai, Buscrai, Buscriggri.
The 1st 2 words, with small variations are popular in many Towns of South Italy. The Last 2, are not familiar to me.
 
My parental grandparents are from one of the Castelmezzano dialect speaking villages.
Little vocabulary this is an expression that they say for tomorrow, the day after, the day after that and repeated for an additional two days
Crei, Pescrei, Pescrile, Mingrile e Mingrotte
Some of these words ,at least,come from Old Latin,like nesterze(nudius tertius),while
crei- pescrei seems similar to Romanian maine-poimaine(post+mane).

http://blog.libero.it/tresbarrato/commenti.php?msgid=2030903&id=67165

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/nudius

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/dies#Latin


Even if Castelmezzano has preserved additional elements, it is hard to believe that the surrounding/other Southern Italian dialects
are very different.

https://books.google.ro/books?id=sE...page&q=castelmezzano dialect romanian&f=false
 
I don' t agree with Ludke,because Campania has always been the most important region from Southern Italy.
In Romanian and Neapolitan Latin s turns to sh,
another very interesting fact is that Campania was the main trading region from Italy,which both explains the many semantic shifts of the Latin lucrum in Romanian,plus the taste of Western Wallachians for well-defined
clothes and extended physical preparations,such as fine haircuts, it is a region where men too spend their time looking in the mirror, without affecting virility, to the contrary,
it is a matter of status.
https://books.google.ro/books?id=6d...age&q=roman campania history commerce&f=false

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/lucru#Romanian


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neapolitan_language
 
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At About 100 Km Southeast from Castelmazzano, in most dialects:
Crai, Buscrai, Buscriggri.
The 1st 2 words, with small variations are popular in many Towns of South Italy. The Last 2, are not familiar to me.

I know Barese dialect also uses a variation of this as well, with the ending is different, my cousins wife is Barese they have until the 4th one.
 
Some of these words ,at least,come from Old Latin,like nesterze(nudius tertius),while
crei- pescrei seems similar to Romanian maine-poimaine(post+mane).

http://blog.libero.it/tresbarrato/commenti.php?msgid=2030903&id=67165

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/nudius

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/dies#Latin


Even if Castelmezzano has preserved additional elements, it is hard to believe that the surrounding/other Southern Italian dialects
are very different.

https://books.google.ro/books?id=sE...page&q=castelmezzano dialect romanian&f=false

They aren’t too different, like Salento stated around the vicinity of where he’s from Lecce they use a similar vocabulary and even the Barese dialect, they are different than Sicilian and Napolitan dialects, perhaps preserving more archaic elements.
 

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