New distribution map of Y-haplogroup E-M81

good question;)

extremely low

saudi arabia - 0%
source:
https://bmcgenomdata.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2156-10-59/tables/1


yemen- 0%
source:
https://www.nature.com/articles/5201934/figures/1

on the other hand when i look at yfull ( which as we know is based on commercial testers i do see saudi arabian flags and even some yemen flags):

https://www.yfull.com/tree/E-m81/

so it must exist in those 2 countries but to very low %
if i would have to guess the source of e-m81 in jordan( amman) , lebanon and syria
might be mainly from egypt instead of the arabian peninsula
probably during fatimid time

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatimid_Caliphate

Many North African on Yfull put flags SAU or YEM because they are said are Arabic and Yemenite
 
Many North African on Yfull put flags SAU or YEM because they are said are Arabic and Yemenite

in a larger sample ( e-m81 do pop up but as i said extremely low)
few months ago i was realy bored so i said why not check for e1b1b1 branches 23 y-str haplotypes of saudi arabians
this research is huge and from all regions of saudi arabia so it is more informative ( i used nevgen predictor
e-m81 haplotype is easy to spot even on 17 y-str) ;)


597 samples all subjects can trace there paternal great grandfather
to 1 of the 5 regions of saudi- arabia
that also includes saudi arabian subject immigrants in britain in this study

1-s2.0-S1872497317302673-gr1.jpg



central region (125 samples)
c19- e-m81(uk)

p.s
1/125 0.8% e-m81



north region (106 samples)
n87-e-m81(north)

p.s
1/106 0.9% e-m81



south region (140 samples)
s79-e-m81(south)
s8-e-m81(uk)
p.s
2/140 1.4% e-m81




west region (116 samples)
w53-e-m81(west)
p.s
1/116 0.8% e-m81



source :

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1872497317302673




p.s
i can tell you that other branches of e1b1b1 are there without any doubt ( i don't post them here because this thread is about e-m81)

 
in a larger sample ( e-m81 do pop up but as i said extremely low)
few months ago i was realy bored so i said why not check for e1b1b1 branches 23 y-str haplotypes of saudi arabians
this research is huge and from all regions of saudi arabia so it is more informative ( i used nevgen predictor
e-m81 haplotype is easy to spot even on 17 y-str) ;)


597 samples all subjects can trace there paternal great grandfather
to 1 of the 5 regions of saudi- arabia
that also includes saudi arabian subject immigrants in britain in this study

1-s2.0-S1872497317302673-gr1.jpg



central region (125 samples)
c19- e-m81(uk)

p.s
1/125 0.8% e-m81



north region (106 samples)
n87-e-m81(north)

p.s
1/106 0.9% e-m81



south region (140 samples)
s79-e-m81(south)
s8-e-m81(uk)
p.s
2/140 1.4% e-m81




west region (116 samples)
w53-e-m81(west)
p.s
1/116 0.8% e-m81



source :

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1872497317302673




p.s
i can tell you that other branches of e1b1b1 are there without any doubt ( i don't post them here because this thread is about e-m81)


well but i'm told according YFULL there many North African put flag KSA and YEM , of course for subscales others under Haplogroup E1b1b is found especially E-M123 <Y6172
 
lebanese druze e-m81 cases
from druze dna project ( i feel ok to post it as there are not even names here just haplotypes);)
i wonder what is the source of e-m81 in them the druze are pretty much close section from 1043 AD :unsure:
E1b: L499>P2>M215>M35>Z827>L19>M81>PF2548>PF2477>PF2546>A2227 (Formed 2200 ybp; -ve A428)
90M10430LebanonE-M35132413913-14111210141130179-911122314193214-15-16-17111119-221513172435-37121010815-158101081011021-22181112121671227181213121411111111
91M14156LebanonE-M35132413913-14111210141130179-911122314203114-16-17-17111119-221513182436-391210
92M10843LebanonE-A2227132413913-14111210141130179-911122314203214-14-16-16111119-221513192436-36121010815-158101081011021-221811121216712271812131214111111113215812112228191212111112910111011122912121814131121161814231512162715212312141791311
93M11412LebanonE-M35132413913-14111210141130179-911122314203214-16-16-17111019-221413172236-361210
94M12000LebanonE-M35132413913-14111210141130189-911122314203214-16-16-1712919-221413172236-371210
95M11985LebanonE-M35132413913-14111210141130189-911122314203314-16-16-16111019-221413172235-371210
E1b: L499>P2>M215>M35>Z827>L19>M81>PF2548>PF2477>PF2546>A2227>MZ143>A428>FGC47411 (A428 Formed 2200 ybp)
96M10304LebanonE-A428132414913-14111210141130179-911122214203214-16-17-2191119-221613192336-38121010815-158101081110021-221811121217713251812131214111111113315812112228191212111112911111011123012121814121121161914241511152515222412141791311
97M14627LebanonE-M35142413913-14111210141130179-911122214203114-16-16-17101019-221613182436-371210
98M14642LebanonE-FGC47411142413913-14111210141130179-911122314203114-16-16-17101119-221613202536-37121010815-158101081110021-221811121217713271812131214111111113315812112228191212111112911111011122912121814131121161813241511152615222412141791311
E1b: L499>P2>M215>M35>Z827>L19>M81>PF2548>PF2477>PF2546>Z5009 (Formed 2200 ybp)
99M14496LebanonE-Z5009132413913-15111210141130189-911122314203014-16-16-16111019-201613192236-39121010815-158101081211021-221811121317712271812131214111111113215812112228191112111113911111011123012121814131121161913241212162615212312141791311
E1b: L499>P2>M215>M35>Z827>L19>M81>PF2548>PF2477>PF2546>Z5009>MZ141>MZ136>BY9656>FGC48219>FGC48223 (Formed 1800 ybp)
100M13213LebanonE-FT67465132414913-14111210131229199-911122314203214-16-16-16111119-221513192337-37121011815-158101081011021-221811121217712271812131214111111113215812112228191113111112911111011123012121814131120161712241511162615212311141891311
source:

https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/druze/about
 
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lebanese druze e-m81 cases
from druze dna project ( i feel ok to post it as there are not even names here just haplotypes);)
i wonder what is the source of e-m81 in them the druze are pretty much close section from 1043 AD :unsure:

https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/druze/about


You know, people moved. Not only from the Levant to the rest of the world but also from the rest of the world to the Levant. In this case from North Africa to the Levant.
 
The early history of the Druze religion is very closely tied to Egypt, where the original proclaimers of the "word" did their work, although they were not Egyptian. Then there was a period when the Druze were not, as at present, an ethno-religion. They preached the "call" throughout the Middle East. There used to be Druze communities in many areas, but they were heavily persecuted as heretics. The largest number who survived were in Lebanon and Syria and probably local people were the largest percentage, but given the place of origin and the proselytizing that went on it shouldn't be a surprise if we find yDna from many places in the Muslim world.
 
i think this future paper some e-m81 will show up ( afcorse along with other haplogroups );)
Ancient DNA from ancient Canarian Islanders illuminates the prehistory of North Africa and evidences the effects of insularity on human populations.
Abstract
The indigenous population of the Canary Islands, which colonized the archipelago around the 3rd century CE, provides both a window into the past of North Africa and a unique model to explore the effects of insularity. We generated genome-wide data from 40 samples from the seven islands, dated between the 3rd – 16th centuries CE. Along with components already present in Moroccan Neolithic populations, the Canarian natives show signatures related to Bronze Age expansions in Eurasia and trans-Saharan migrations. The lack of gene flow between islands and constant or decreasing effective population sizes suggest that populations were isolated. While some island populations maintained relatively high genetic diversity, with the only detected bottleneck coinciding with the colonization time, other islands with fewer natural resources show the effects of insularity and isolation. Finally, consistent genetic differentiation between eastern and western islands points to a more complex colonization process than previously thought.
source for bam files :

https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/browser/view/PRJEB61655


Y results( twitter user)


farther downstream in twitter

F1RtdIVX0AEW1EE
 
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Published today(y)
CAN010 the oldest male in the samples
Is e-m81;)
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-023-40198-w

nice spreadsheet of: the males y haplogroup from the most ancient to the most recent in this paper ( done by twitter user)


F3lpoSlWIAMLVV1


P.s
Interesting also the e1a-m132 cases
There some presence of his downstream branches
In southern europe especialy in sardinia
 
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The Origins of the Royal Spanish Surname Castilla: Genetics and Genealogy

Abstract

In most Western European societies, surnames pass from generation to generation and in cases where surnames are shared by fathers to children, the Y chromosome passes down from fathers to male offspring in the same way as surnames do. The aim of this study was to ascertain the patrilineal relationship between individuals with the surname “Castilla” and their respective Y-chromosome haplotypes. The toponymic surname “Castilla” is part of the Spanish royal family. Genealogical studies of this surname have allowed the formulation of different hypotheses about its origin, most of which were centered in Burgos. To shed some light on the origin of the surname Castilla and to investigate the possible co-ancestry behind the living carriers of this surname, markers located in the Y chromosome-specific region were analyzed in a sample of 102 men whose paternal surname was Castilla. The study aimed to establish the minimum number of founders and the expansion time of the lineages from our sample. Two major haplogroups were identified: R1b and E1b1b-M81. The high frequency of the E1b1b-M81 haplogroup in comparison to that of the general Spanish population, its low haplotype diversity, and its young TMRCA (323+/− 255 years CE) are compatible with the historical timing of the obligation to use surnames. However, the coincidence of the most common haplogroup in the Castilla sample and the most frequent haplogroup in the Spanish general population, R1b, makes it difficult to identify founder haplotypes/haplogroups in the history of the Castilla surname.

genealogy-07-00052-g004.png




source:
https://www.mdpi.com/2313-5778/7/3/52
 
Thanks for sharing. It is a pity that the studies on the entire Spanish population (Flores et al. 2004, López-Parra 2008) used in this paper as a yardstick are rather old.

When the distribution of haplogroups in the Castilla sample was considered, it was similar to that of the Spanish population (Flores et al. 2004) (Table 1). The R1b haplogroup was present in 49% of men with the surname Castilla; however, the frequency of the E1b1-M81 haplogroup (13.9%) was much higher than that found in the Iberian Peninsula population (4.03%) (López-Parra 2008). Haplogroups O1b1 and Q-M346 were more frequent in the Asian and American populations. These haplogroups were present among the samples collected in this study, although at a low frequency, similar to the general Spanish population (Flores et al. 2004).
 
Nice, this is my born-state, I m r1a but E-M81 was really common among our state, as we notice that a lot of Canarians came to our state, as well as several Andalusian, Azorean(the highest ancestry among our population), Northern Italians, etc... Thank you for your post.
 

Haplogroup E-PF2546 Spread From Carthage Through Northern Africa Looking For Victory​

Fast-forwarding through history, we soon move into the Iron Age and the rise of some of the world’s greatest empires. One empire that reigned powerfully across the Mediterranean for hundreds of years, eventually falling at the hands of Rome, was the Carthaginians.

Carthage, in modern-day Tunisia, was home to generations of great leaders during the early years of the Iron Age, but none is as well-remembered as Hannibal, who led forces to victory from North Africa into Europe around 220 BCE. During the Punic Wars, Hannibal and tens of thousands of men, cavalry, and even war elephants crossed Iberia through Gaul (modern-day France), reaching and ransacking parts of the young Roman Empire.
Coincidentally, we see with Globetrekker evidence in the form of several unique branches of haplogroup E-PF2546 following that same path, presumably carried by Cathagianian men, spreading from Northern Africa through Iberia, Sicily, and Sardinia, at that exact moment in history. Some 2,250 years after Hanninal and his elephants crossed the Alps and reached Rome, we still see DNA breadcrumbs of that infamous migration across that region today.

source:
 
the e-m165 split inside e-m81
is interesting branch
as most e-m81's are derived for the parallel branch e-z1200/CTS4236

at ftdna discover tool
(1 scientific bedouin sample from the negev israel, 1 german, 1 from unknown country)



in yfull
 
the e-m165 split inside e-m81
is interesting branch
as most e-m81's are derived for the parallel branch e-z1200/CTS4236

at ftdna discover tool
(1 scientific bedouin sample from the negev israel, 1 german, 1 from unknown country)



in yfull
https://www.yfull.com/tree/E-L19/
the non M81 branch of E-L19 is also interesting, I even see a fellow Armenian id:YF014300 appears!:p
about half of Armenian E1b1b is E-M123, however the remaining branches sees to be diverse, we even find one sample possibly related to North Africa
 
https://www.yfull.com/tree/E-L19/
the non M81 branch of E-L19 is also interesting, I even see a fellow Armenian id:YF014300 appears!:p
about half of Armenian E1b1b is E-M123, however the remaining branches sees to be diverse, we even find one sample possibly related to North Africa

yes very cool :cool:
by destiny this lone e-L19>PF2431 armenian is related to
this famous dude paternally


p.s
i mentioned him in list of famous e1b1b1 people
page 2
 
yes very cool :cool:
by destiny this lone e-L19>PF2431 armenian is related to
this famous dude paternally


p.s
i mentioned him in list of famous e1b1b1 people
page 2
wow, thx for update, this gentelmen, for all his contributions toward post WW-II industrial world, I wish world could associate "Armenian" with him, than that annoying feel-good drama queen (you know what I am talking about) :ROFLMAO:
 
so the E-L19 and pre e-m81 individuals from ifri N'Amr Ou Moussa cave
likely adopted the agriculture from people who moved from iberia


from the article :
By contrast, in a 7,100 year old necropolis not even 200km to the south – the Ifri N'Amr Ou Moussa cave – an entire community of farmers was discovered. Though they had imprinted ceramics, their genetic profile was entirely indigenous to the region. This appears to be evidence of the local population simply adopting neolithic practices without assimilating into a new society.
 
KEB.6. The Y chromosome from KEB belongs to the T-M184 haplogroup; though scarce and broadly distributed today, this haplogroup has been already observed in European Neolitich individuals.
KEB.6. The only 1KG sample on the three matching that description is a Tuscan individual (NA20520) and it is classified as T-L208* (T1a1a). However it is worth mentioning that the 1KG database lacks samples from North Africa. In fact Haplogroup T-M70 (T1a) accounts for 1.16%-6.22% of NA Y-chromosome lineages.
KEB.6 belongs to mtDNA K1a4a1 and is considered a typical European Neolitich lineage and it has been thoroughly observed in Neolithic population with a frequency of 10%."

most samples coming from northern Spain and settling in atlantic side Morocco
 

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